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Ihor Markov (Ukraine)

Oct 15, 2019 to July 15, 2020

Ihor Markov is a Senior Research Fellow at the Department of the Social Anthropology of the Institute of Ethnology, the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine.

His research broadly concerns social mobilization and migration, social dynamics and identities, communication and political process.

Ihor has coordinated comprehensive study of the processes of Ukrainian labor migration in the EU and Russia conducted directly in 8 host countries of immigrants and based on an extensive ethnographic field research. Recently he was the Local Coordinator for Ukraine in multy-country Research Consortium of  the research project  “Transnational Migration in Transition: Transformative Characteristics of Temporary Mobility of People (EURA-NET)” under the coordination of the University of Tampere. His current research is a book project about the transformation of sociality due to mobility by the example  of various transnational migration flows related to Ukraine. Project focuses on theoretical and methodological approaches to study on the sociality of movement.

Ihor received a B.Sc. and M.Sc. in history from the National Ivan Franko University (Ukraine) and PhD in ethnology from the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. He is a founder of the Department of the Social Antropology at the National Academy of Sciences - the first schorlary unit in Ukraine, officially representing this field of study. His research has been funded by RENOVABIS,  Soros Foundation, the European Union 7-th Framework Programme (Horizon 2020) and other sources.

Ihor Markov is currently working on a book project, which will be based primarily on analyses of field research on various transnational migration flows related to Ukraine.  Most of these flows have one common feature, which he characterize as “people permanently on the move.” The focus will be threefold: 1) similarities  with other regions of mass migration, especially the USA; 2) linkages to other forms of human mobility in the wider context of social transformation; and  3) theoretical and methodological approaches to research on the concept of  “people permanently on the move.” Hopefully, the study will shed further light on a controversial issue with growing social and political issues worldwide.