Claire Adida’s new book “Immigrant Exclusion and Insecurity in Africa: Coethnic Strangers”

Immigrant Exclusion - AdidaClaire L. Adida, UC San Diego Assistant Professor of Political Science and CCIS Research Associate, has published a new book through Cambridge Press – Immigrant Exclusion and Insecurity in Africa: Coethnic Strangers

The book explores the diverse immigrant experiences in urban West Africa, where some groups integrate seamlessly while others face exclusion and violence. It shows, counterintuitively, that cultural similarities between immigrants and their hosts do not help immigrant integration and may, in fact, disrupt it. This book is one of the first to describe and explain in a systematic way immigrant integration in the developing world, where half of all international migrants go. It relies on intensive fieldwork tracking two immigrant groups in three host cities, and draws from in-depth interviews and survey data to paint a picture of the immigrant experience from both immigrant and host perspectives.

KNOMAD issues Call for Proposal on Internal Migration and Urbanization

 The Global Knowledge Partnership on Migration and Development (KNOMAD) is envisaged to be a global hub of knowledge and policy expertise on migration and development issues. KNOMAD draws on experts from all parts of the world to synthesize existing knowledge and generate new knowledge for use by policy makers in sending and receiving countries. KNOMAD works in close coordination with the Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD) and the Global Migration Group (GMG).

KNOMAD has been working on improving understanding on internal migration and urbanization. In 2014, KNOMAD worked on three aspects of internal migration: (i) drivers of internal migration, (ii) impact of internal migration, including on poverty reduction, and (iii) internal migration data. Some of the work is available as a KNOMAD Working Paper series and on KNOMAD web, www.knomad.org .

In an effort to further enhance understanding on internal migration, the KNOMAD Thematic Working Group on Internal Migration and Urbanization plans to look into the link between internal migration and rural and urban development. It aims to identify good practices that help develop sustainable livelihoods and create jobs in rural and urban areas, while leveraging the internal migration process for poverty reduction and development.

Please click here for more information on the Call for Proposal specifying the objectives and scope of the research, together with timelines.

If interested in joining this effort, please send a research proposal to C.R. Abrar (crabrar@gmail.com), Rosemary Vargas-Lundius (vargaslundius@hotmail.co.uk), copying Soonhwa Yi (syi@worldbank.org) by February 23, 2015. A proposal should specify (i) motivation and the main research question, (ii) brief literature review, (iii) methodology, (iv) expected findings and their policy implications, (v) team composition and budget, and (vi) timeline.

 

Puentes Consortium opens call for research stays

Puentes ConsortiumPuentes Consortium has opened its annual call for short-term research stays. Funds are available for professors and for PhD students from UCSD for four to six weeks stays over the summer in Mexico at the University of Monterrey, University of the Americas Puebla, and the Tecnologico de Monterrey.

Priority is given to research related to binational and border issues, but the consortium has a wider interest in issues related to energy, the environment, education and health. The deadline for proposals is March 1st and the call is attached.

Proposals can be submitted directly to puentes@rice.edu but I would like to encourage prospective applicants to notify me of their application as well.

Immigrant Justice Group accepting applications for 2015 class

Immigrant Justice Corps

Immigrant Justice Corps recruits talented lawyers and college graduates from around the country and partners them with New York City’s leading non-profit legal services providers and community-based organizations to offer a broad range of immigration assistance including naturalization, deportation defense, and affirmative applications for asylum seekers, juveniles, and victims of crime, domestic violence or human trafficking.

The Community Fellowship is a 2-year program designed for recent college graduates who are interested in immigration law, social justice, and public service. We are trained in immigration law and have paralegal-type responsibilities. IJC is now accepting applications for the 2015 class.

Applications close on March 2, 2015.  More details about the fellowship and application process can be found at http://justicecorps.org/apply/#tabs-1-2.

IJC will be doing on-campus visits throughout the months of January and February. Visit their Facebook page for the dates and locations. We will also have two Q & A conference calls. The first will be on February 2nd at 3 p.m. EST and the second on February 18th at 5 p.m. EST. Please email tdao@justicecorps.org to RSVP.

Erin Conners awarded grant to study migration and Chagas disease

 Erin Conners, doctoral student in Public Health-Global Health, has been awarded a dissertation research grant by UC MEXUS to study the prevalence and correlates of Chagas disease among a group of migrants at the Mexico-Guatemala border and explore whether they have a heightened vulnerability to contracting the disease. Chagas disease is a potentially life-threatening chronic illness that affects an estimated 8 million individuals in Latin America.

Alina Mendez awarded grant for Bracero-era migration study

Alina Mendez has been awarded a UC MEXUS research grant for her dissertation study entitled “Cheap for Whom? Family Migration and Labor in the Imperial-Mexicali Borderlands, 1942-1964.” The study examines the dynamics of social reproduction of transborder workers in the eastern California-Baja California borderlands during the Bracero Program era.

Alina is a Ph.D. candidate in the History Department at UC San Diego.

Feb 9: The Latinos of Asia with Anthony Ocampo – CCIS Seminar

Anthony C. Ocampo. Assistant Professor of Sociology, Cal Poly Pomona

Monday, February 9, 12:00pm

Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building

Conference Room 115, First Floor

 

The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race

Mass migration from Latin America and Asia is dramatically changing the racial landscape of our nation. In California, Latinos and Asians already collectively constitute the majority in large metropolitan areas, a demographic shift that is reshaping the way children of immigrants are racially incorporated into American society. To date, race scholars treat Latinos and Asians as two distinct panethnic categories. In this presentation, Professor Ocampo examines how Filipino Americans, the largest Asian group in the state, disrupt this conventional divide and negotiate their racial identity within an emerging Latino-Asian racial spectrum.

Drawing on interviews and survey data of Filipino Americans in Southern California, Professor Ocampo demonstrates how multiethnic contexts interact with historical factors to influence Filipino racial formation. I argue that the cultural residuals of Spanish and U.S. colonialism affect how Filipinos racially position themselves vis-à-vis Latinos and Asians, the two fastest growing panethnic groups in the country. These findings have implications for better understanding how the racialization process is evolving as the United States moves beyond a black-white racial paradigm.

Anthony OcampoDr. Anthony Ocampo is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona. His award-winning research and teaching focuses on the experiences of minority groups in the United States. He has published research on the cultural and educational experiences of Latinos, Asian Americans, and LGBT people in the U.S. in Ethnic and Racial Studies, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Latino Studies, and Journal of Asian American Studies. He is currently working on two books on immigration, which are under contract with Stanford University Press and NYU Press.

Jan 22: What Makes a Political Refugee ‘Political’? with James Hathaway – IICAS Seminar

James C . Hathaway, Director of the Program in Refugee and Asylum Law, University of Michigan

Thursday, January 22, 4:00pm

Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building

Conference Room 115, First Floor

 

What Makes a Political Refugee ‘Political’?

James HathawayJames C. Hathaway, the James E. and Sarah A. Degan Professor of Law at the University of Michigan, is a leading authority on international refugee law whose work is regularly cited by the most senior courts of the common law world. He is the founding director of Michigan Law’s Program in Refugee and Asylum Law, Distinguished Visiting Professor of International Refugee Law at the University of Amsterdam, and Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne.

Professor Hathaway’s publications include The Law of Refugee Status (2014), with Michelle Foster; Transnational Law: Cases and Materials (2013), with Mathias Reimann, Timothy Dickinson, and Joel Samuels; Human Rights and Refugee Law (2013); The Rights of Refugees Under International Law (2005); Reconceiving International Refugee Law (1997); and more than 80 journal articles. He is founding patron and senior adviser to Asylum Access, a nonprofit organization committed to delivering innovative legal aid to refugees in the global South, and counsel on international protection to the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants.

This presentation is a part of the Seeking Asylum in North America speaker series, co-sponsored by the California Western School of Law, the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies and the Scholars Strategy Network.

 

Oct 8-11: ASA Annual Meeting in Toronto

PANEL: “North of Misery: Migration, Affect, and Action” 
American Studies Association Annual Meeting
Oct. 8-11, 2015. Toronto, Canada

ASA logo

The large number of Central American refugees who crossed the Rio Grande in 2014 arrived with harrowing stories about current conditions in Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, as well as the dangerous journey through Mexico. Their arrival in the U.S. also generated a range of emotional responses and demands for action, from anti-immigrant protests to calls for humanitarian aid and economic development to the swift militarization of the border. Building from this moment, this panel will explore the relation between affect and action within the longer history of immigration in North America. How have those in the Global North imagined suffering in the Americas and their relation to it? What do their responses to migrants (and to migrant narratives) reveal about the political efficacy of emotion?

Proposals from all disciplines are welcome. Potential papers might consider: affect in the debate over immigration; representations of migrants in literature, visual art, performance and film; activism and theatricality; expressions of empathy, sentimentality, and/or moral outrage; structures of feeling in the “North”; the evolving symbolic role of the North/El Norte; the historic and contemporary role of Canada as refuge.

Please send abstracts (200-300 words) and brief CV by Jan. 5 to Stephen Park (stephen.park@utb.edu). Inquiries before that are welcome.