Tomás Jiménez – When White is Just Alright: How Immigrants Redefine Achievement and Reconfigure the Ethnoracial Hierarchy

 

Seminar to be held on Wednesday, April 17th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

Research on immigration, educational achievement, and ethnoraciality has followed the lead of racialization and assimilation theories by focusing empirical attention on the immigrant-origin population (immigrants and their children) and effectively ignoring the third-plus generation (those who are US-born of US-born parents).  We depart from this orthodox approach by placing third-plus-generation individuals at center stage to examine how they adjust to norms that the immigrant-origin population defines.  We draw on fieldwork in Cupertino, California, a high-skilled immigrant gateway, where an Asian immigrant-origin population has established and enforces an amplified version of high-achievement norms.  The resulting ethnoracial encoding of academic achievement constructs whiteness as having “lesser-than” status.  Whiteness has come to represent low-achievement, laziness, and academic mediocrity; Asianness, by comparison, stands for high-achievement, hard work, and success.  We argue that immigrants can serve as a foil against which the meaning and status of an ethnoracial category become recast, upending how the category is normally deployed in daily life.  Our findings call into question the largely taken-for-granted analytical position that treats the third-plus generation, and especially whites, as the benchmark population that sets achievement norms and to which all other populations must adjust.

Tomas JimenezTomás Jiménez is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Stanford University. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity (University of California Press, 2010) was recently awarded the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Latinos/as Section 2011 Distinguished Book Award. He is currently working on three projects. The first examines how host-society individuals (US-born of US-born parents) participate in the assimilation process by drawing on in-depth interviews with host-society individuals and observations in three distinct sub-regions in the Silicon Valley: East Palo Alto, Cupertino, and Berryessa. A second project (with Stanford PhD Candidate, Lorena Castro) looks at how immigration becomes part of American national identity. A third project (with social psychologist John Dovidio (Yale), political scientist Deborah Schildkraut (Tufts), and social psychologist Yuen Ho (UCLA), examines how contextual factors shape the sense of belonging and related intergroup attitudes, behaviors, and support for immigration policies among immigrants and host-society members in the United States.  Professor Jiménez has taught at the University of California, San Diego. He has also been an Irvine Fellow at the New America Foundation. Before that, he was the American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of Rep. Michael Honda (CA-15). His writing on policy has appeared in reports for the Immigration Policy Center, and he has written opinion-editorials on the topic of immigrant assimilation in several major news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, CNN.com, and the San Diego Union-Tribune. He holds a B.S. in sociology from Santa Clara University and A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Harvard University.

Summer Institute and Predissertation Fellowship on Inequality (June 17-26, 2013)

logoThe Penn Social Science and Policy Forum is pleased to announce its initial Summer Institute for Predissertation Students to be held in June of 2013.

Under the leadership of CCIS Director/Professor John Skrentny of the University of California-San Diego and SSPF Director Thomas Sugrue of the University of Pennsylvania, this program will provide opportunities for talented doctoral students in the social sciences to visit the University of Pennsylvania campus to explore research topics and scholarship related to the theme of Inequality.

For more information, click here.

Call for Proposals – 8th Summer Institute on Migration and Global Health

8th Summer Institute on Migration and Global Health
Berkeley and Oakland, California / Monday, June 24, 2013 – Friday, June 28, 2013

The Summer Institute on Migration and Global Health is an international event that offers researchers, faculty, graduate students and professionals working with migrant communities around the world, a unique opportunity to learn about different health issues that affect mobile populations. International experts will present on the relationship between migration and global health from public health, public policy, and social science perspectives.

The organization of the 8th Summer Institute on Migration and Global Health is a joint effort of the Health Initiative of the Americas –a program of UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health-, the UC Global Health Institute through its Center of Expertise on Migration and Health, and the Migration and Health Research Center.

UC Graduate Student Workshop Proposals
As a special track of the Summer Institute, the UC Center of Expertise on Migration and Health (COEMH) will offer a Research Training Workshop for University of California graduate students, recent postdoctoral scholars, and junior faculty attending the Institute.

The Research Training Workshop will feature presentations of ongoing or recently completed research relating to migration and health, undertaking by graduate students, recent postdocs, and junior faculty, through the UC system. UC faculty members will serve as discussants, providing expert feedback on the student’s work and commenting on its relevance to their own research. The workshop organizing committee will seek publication of selected papers in a peer-reviewed journal.

For more information, click here.

John Skrentny and Jane Lilly Lopez present at Indiana Journal of Law & Social Equality Symposium

graphic-logo-indiana-university-maurer-school-lawCCIS Director John Skrentny and Graduate Student Researcher Jane Lilly Lopez, will present their paper “Obama’s Immigration Reform: The Triumph of Executive Action in His First Term” at the Indiana Journal of Law & Social Equality Annual Symposium: “Social Equality: Looking Forward and Looking Back” on Friday, April 5th.

For more information, click here.

Rocio Rosales – Migrants of Dos Mundos: Sending Community, Exploitative Relations and Immigrant Outcomes

Thursday, March 7
12:30-2:00pm
Social Sciences Building 101

This paper is based on five years of ethnographic field research among a group of Latino fruit vendors in Los Angeles as well as interviews with their Mexico-based family members. It examines the influence of the sending community on migrant outcomes in the United States. For this population of migrants, I argue that the sending community and social networks structured around it can help to explain how migrants entered into and remained in the informal and high-risk work of fruit vending. In some instances, the exploitative nature of social networks structured around sending community negatively impacted outcomes in the U.S. and subsequently affected these migrants’ economic and social contact with home.

rosales-profilepicRocio Rosales is a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California – San Diego.  She completed her Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of California-Los Angeles in 2012. She received her A.B. in Sociology (cum laude) with a certificate in Latin American Studies from Princeton University. Her research interests involve international migration, informal work, Latinos/as in the U.S. and urban ethnography. Her work will appear in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies and as a chapter in a forthcoming edited book published by the Russell Sage Foundation.

* Jointly sponsored with UCSD Department of Sociology

Launch of CIR Blog

The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies (CCIS) at UC San Diego has launched a new blog that will provide analyses of the comprehensive immigration reform debate as it unfolds.  For more information and to view the blog, click here.

Gabriel J. Chin – Federalism at the Border: Immigration Policy and the States

Tuesday, March 5 at 6:00pm
Hojel Auditorium, Institute of the Americas
UC San Diego

Two recent U.S. Supreme Court cases seem to send opposite messages about the hundreds of recent state and local laws regulating noncitizens. One decision upheld Arizona’s law imposing sanctions on employers hiring undocumented workers, while the other struck down many parts of that state’s notorious SB1070, designed to drive out undocumented people using a policy of “attrition through enforcement.” Where is the line between valid state assistance to the federal government and unconstitutionally establishing independent state immigration policies? What could be wrong with the states helping enforce the federal government’s own statutes?

Gabriel J. Chin is Professor of Law at the University of California Davis School of Law. A former professor at the University of Arizona, he has written extensively about that state’s SB1070 law and other state immigration regulations.

For more information, contact Warren College at waprovost@ucsd.edu.

*Jointly sponsored with UC San Diego, Earl Warren College and California Western School of Law, San Diego

 

Audrey Singer – Immigrant Workers, Human Capital Investment and Strengthening Regional Economies

 

Seminar to be held on Monday, March 4th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

Coming out of the Great Recession, slow economic recovery has U.S. communities seeking strategies that will grow jobs in the short term and improve standards of living over the long term. This talk focuses on immigrants in the labor force and their skills, an especially relevant topic given that debates about immigration policy reform have started.  How geographic regions can invest in the human capital and economic advancement of immigrants who are already living in their jurisdictions, to help boost short- and long-term U.S. economic growth, will be discussed.

Immigrant skills-0025Audrey Singer is a senior fellow at the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program. Her areas of expertise include demography, international migration, U.S. immigration policy, and urban and metropolitan change. She has written extensively on U.S. immigration trends, including immigrant integration, undocumented migration, naturalization and citizenship, and the changing racial and ethnic composition of the United States. Her co-edited book, Twenty-First Century Gateways: Immigrant Incorporation in Suburban America, focuses on the fastest growing immigrant populations among second-tier metropolitan areas including Washington, DC, Atlanta, Dallas, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Sacramento, and Charlotte.  Other Brookings publications include, “The Geography of Immigrant Skills,” “State of Metropolitan America: on the Front Lines of Demographic Transformation,” “Immigrants, Politics, and Local Response in Suburban Washington,” “The Rise of New Immigrant Gateways,” and “From ‘Here’ to ‘There:’ Refugee Resettlement in Metropolitan America.”  Her articles have appeared in academic journals such as International Migration Review, Demography, Urban Geography, Geographical Review, and Ethnic and Racial Studies and her commentary has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, CNN.com, Baltimore Sun, Christian Science Monitor, Seattle Times and Vanguardia Dossier.  Prior to joining Brookings, Singer was an associate in the International Migration Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Prior to Carnegie, she held a faculty position in the Department of Demography at Georgetown University, and was a demographic analyst at the U.S. Department of Labor. She was chair of the International Migration Section of the American Sociological Association in 2010.  Singer earned a Ph.D. in sociology, with a specialization in demography, from the University of Texas at Austin. She has an M.A. in sociology also from the University of Texas at Austin and a B.A. in sociology from Temple University. She conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Chicago.