Kathy Kopinak presented at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte

CCIS Senior Fellow Kathy Kopinak presented at the International Seminar: “The status of women in the border regions. The case of Mexico-US and Morocco-Spain” at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte in Tijuana, B.C on May 8-9.  Her talk was entitled, “A comparison of family cultures among migrants with work experience in export processing industries in Mexico and Morocco”.

For more information, click here.

Tom K. Wong – Will Comprehensive Immigration Reform Pass? Predicting Legislative Support and Opposition to CIR

 

Seminar to be held on Monday, April 29th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

Will comprehensive immigration reform (CIR) pass in 2013? The momentum that has been building towards CIR, which accelerated with last November’s presidential election and has since grown even more with the recent introduction of the Senate ‘gang of 8′s” bill, has shown no signs of slowing down. As a matter of politics, the key question is whether there are enough votes in Congress? While there are no crystal balls to tell us how legislators will ultimately vote, the recent history of immigration politics in the U.S. provides sufficient information to make informed predictions, not only about how current members of Congress are likely to vote on the final passage of CIR, but also about how they are likely to vote on the various amendments that will be introduced. By modeling voting behavior on all recent immigration – related legislation – which provides some 6,000 observations in the Senate and over 10,000 observations in the House – I provide estimates for all 535 current members of Congress of the number of yes and no votes on the final passage of CIR, as well as estimates for a number of key amendments that, if passed, could fundamentally alter the bill.

wongTom K. Wong is assistant professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego. Professor Wong’s research focuses on the politics of immigration, citizenship, and migrant illegality. As these issues have far-reaching implications, his work also explores the links between immigration, race and ethnicity, and the politics of identity. He is completing a book manuscript, which analyzes the determinants of immigration control policy across twenty-five Western immigrant-receiving democracies. He is also working on a project that creates a typology of the mobility regimes of immigrant-sending countries in order to explain patterns of contemporary international migration, as well as a project on the politics of migrant illegality. His work has been published as a book chapter with Stanford University Press and in the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies.

Tomás Jiménez – When White is Just Alright: How Immigrants Redefine Achievement and Reconfigure the Ethnoracial Hierarchy

 

Seminar to be held on Wednesday, April 17th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

Research on immigration, educational achievement, and ethnoraciality has followed the lead of racialization and assimilation theories by focusing empirical attention on the immigrant-origin population (immigrants and their children) and effectively ignoring the third-plus generation (those who are US-born of US-born parents).  We depart from this orthodox approach by placing third-plus-generation individuals at center stage to examine how they adjust to norms that the immigrant-origin population defines.  We draw on fieldwork in Cupertino, California, a high-skilled immigrant gateway, where an Asian immigrant-origin population has established and enforces an amplified version of high-achievement norms.  The resulting ethnoracial encoding of academic achievement constructs whiteness as having “lesser-than” status.  Whiteness has come to represent low-achievement, laziness, and academic mediocrity; Asianness, by comparison, stands for high-achievement, hard work, and success.  We argue that immigrants can serve as a foil against which the meaning and status of an ethnoracial category become recast, upending how the category is normally deployed in daily life.  Our findings call into question the largely taken-for-granted analytical position that treats the third-plus generation, and especially whites, as the benchmark population that sets achievement norms and to which all other populations must adjust.

Tomas JimenezTomás Jiménez is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Stanford University. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity (University of California Press, 2010) was recently awarded the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Latinos/as Section 2011 Distinguished Book Award. He is currently working on three projects. The first examines how host-society individuals (US-born of US-born parents) participate in the assimilation process by drawing on in-depth interviews with host-society individuals and observations in three distinct sub-regions in the Silicon Valley: East Palo Alto, Cupertino, and Berryessa. A second project (with Stanford PhD Candidate, Lorena Castro) looks at how immigration becomes part of American national identity. A third project (with social psychologist John Dovidio (Yale), political scientist Deborah Schildkraut (Tufts), and social psychologist Yuen Ho (UCLA), examines how contextual factors shape the sense of belonging and related intergroup attitudes, behaviors, and support for immigration policies among immigrants and host-society members in the United States.  Professor Jiménez has taught at the University of California, San Diego. He has also been an Irvine Fellow at the New America Foundation. Before that, he was the American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of Rep. Michael Honda (CA-15). His writing on policy has appeared in reports for the Immigration Policy Center, and he has written opinion-editorials on the topic of immigrant assimilation in several major news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, CNN.com, and the San Diego Union-Tribune. He holds a B.S. in sociology from Santa Clara University and A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Harvard University.

Summer Institute and Predissertation Fellowship on Inequality (June 17-26, 2013)

logoThe Penn Social Science and Policy Forum is pleased to announce its initial Summer Institute for Predissertation Students to be held in June of 2013.

Under the leadership of CCIS Director/Professor John Skrentny of the University of California-San Diego and SSPF Director Thomas Sugrue of the University of Pennsylvania, this program will provide opportunities for talented doctoral students in the social sciences to visit the University of Pennsylvania campus to explore research topics and scholarship related to the theme of Inequality.

For more information, click here.