New Leadership at CCIS

headshot-david-fitzgerald-bw
John Skrentny, Director
David FitzGerald, Associate Director
 

After a distinguished career spanning 30 years at UCSD, Wayne Cornelius will leave his position as Director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies (CCIS). Wayne’s commitment to Mexican immigration, politics, and development has produced a legacy of two important academic units for our campus – the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, which he founded in 1979; and CCIS, an interdisciplinary, multi-national Organized Research Unit (ORU) devoted to comparative work on international migration and refugee movements, formally established in 2002.

Effective July 1, 2009, I am pleased to appoint John Skrentny, Sociology, to the CCIS Directorship. Professor Skrentny’s distinguished immigration research will enable him to build on the strong foundation of comparative immigration studies at UCSD. Additionally, I am pleased to appoint David FitzGerald as Associate Director for CCIS. Professor FitzGerald has co-directed CCIS’s Mexican Migration Field Research and Training Program with distinction and will assist Director Skrentny with the Center’s administration.

Please join me in congratulating John and David on their appointments. I am confident that the CCIS research and training mission will continue to expand under their guidance and leadership.

Arthur B. Ellis
Vice Chancellor for Research
University of California, San Diego

Thursday Immigration Blog Roundup (Daily Kos)

dkosLogo…New data, from a research team led by Wayne Cornelius, Director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San  Diego, indicates that the condition of the U.S. economy is more significant in explaining the recent decline in border apprehensions than any of the enforcement-only measures that have been implemented to date….Read full article »

Immigration decline (San Diego Union-Tribune)

SanDiegoUnionTribune…When a team of researchers from the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at UCSD interviewed more than 1,000 people from a small town in the Mexican state of YucatÁn, they found that about 25 percent fewer people are considering crossing this year, compared to a similar study they did three years ago. The researchers also found that 90 percent of those interviewed said it was getting harder to find gainful employment in the United States… Read full article »

County not go-to spot for Latinos in region (San Diego Union-Tribune)

SanDiegoUnionTribune…”Migrants these days go where the non-agricultural jobs are, and where their relatives have taken up residence,” said Wayne Cornelius, director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California San Diego. “San Diego’s employment base is not particularly attractive these days, especially when the effects of family networks are factored in…” Read full article »

Employers, not immigrants, targeted (San Diego Union-Tribune)

SanDiegoUnionTribune“…The depressed jobs magnet – particularly in construction – has been a deterrent to illegal immigration, said Wayne Cornelius, director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at UC San Diego. But work-site enforcement has not, according to recent interviews with prospective migrants conducted by the center in the Mexican state of Yucatan…” Read full article »

Migration Across the Disciplines: A Symposium on How the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities Study Population Movements

migration-across-disciplinesThis conference was made possible through the generous support of the Dean of Arts and Humanities, the Dean of Social Sciences, California Cultures in Comparative Perspective, the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies (CCIS), and the following departments: Anthropology; Ethnic Studies; History; Literature, and Visual Arts.

Migration Across the Disciplines Agenda »

And still, Mexicans come (Arizona Daily Star)

Arizona Daily Star…Agents catch one in three border crossers, according to research from Wayne Cornelius, director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California-San Diego. If that’s true, as many as 3,000 people cross through the sector daily.
“Those folks don’t have any alternative,” Cornelius said. “They have to take the risks of migration even under these conditions because they have no economic options in their hometowns.” …