Alex Balch – Managing labour migration in Europe: Ideas, knowledge and policy change

Listen below to the Research Seminar given by Alex Balch on November 3, 2009.  We also encourage you to subscribe to our podcast to automatically receive audio of all CCIS research seminars.

Alex Balch – Managing Labour Migration in Europe:  Ideas, Knowledge, and Policy Change

 
Labour migration policies in European countries have exhibited intensive change in the early part of the 21st century while the subject continues to be a hot political topic with global resonance. Dr Balch focuses on this new era of labour migration management in Europe and presents research into the key ideas which have changed the way that policymakers look at the issue. The paper presents empirical evidence from two case studies – the UK and Spain (two of the major labour importers within the EU), and charts why, when and how paradigm shifts occur.

Understanding the so-called ‘war of ideas’ in the political arena and accounting for policy change are among the key challenges for political science. The approach taken here is to take a step back and place labour migration policy in a theoretical conception of the policymaking process and policy change. In this way, rather than denouncing policymakers as irrational, incompetent (or even racist) the research attempts to show what kinds of ideas and knowledge actually shape and frame policy in the new era of migration management in Europe.


headshot-alex-balch-bwAlex Balch is a guest scholar, CCIS and an Economic and Social Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Politics at the University of Sheffield (UK). His work is on analyzing the impacts of ideas and knowledge on labour migration policies. It addresses the observation that we often know very little about the flow of ideas and knowledge in the policy process, and what actually drives politicians and policymakers to make decisions about immigration. He is also currently developing projects examining organizational implementation and delivery chains in border control policies, and media framing of policy debates. Part of the fellowship includes funding for an overseas institutional visit at CCIS which will allow Dr. Balch to develop his research by adding extra depth in terms of a comparative perspective on the European context through reference to the U.S.

CCIS Staff and Alums Present at Office of Migrant Education Conference

OME conference logo_finalCCIS staff members David Keyes and Jonathan Hicken along with Mexican Migration Field Research Program (MMFRP) alums Normita Rodriguez, Grecia Lima, and Travis Silva presented on October 28th at the United States Department of Education Office of Migrant Education’s annual conference.

Keyes, Hicken, Rodriguez, and Lima presented a panel discussion titled “Gaining Trust: Working With Migrant Populations. Lessons from the Mexican Migration Field Research Program.” The discussion offered strategies to gain trust when working with populations learned in many years of MMFRP research. Silva’s talk, “An Overview of Recent Findings from the Mexican Migration Field Research Project,” presented education-related research from the past two years of MMFRP.

FitzGerald speaks at the International Institute, University of Michigan

On October 27, CCIS Associate Director David FitzGerald will speak at the International Institute which is located at the University of Michigan.  His Lecture is titled “Citizenship à la Carte: Emigration and the Sovereign State”.  What follows is the blurb featured on the International Institute’s website:

[Professor FitzGerald] is coming to the University of Michigan to discuss, “Citizenship à la Carte: Emigration and the Sovereign State” – People, goods, and ideas are on the move across international borders. Many scholars surveying the speed and volume of these movements have argued that a new era of globalization is eroding the sovereignty of the nation-state. Scholars of transnationalism in particular argue that countries of emigration have become “deterritorialized” as the members of the nation spread beyond the territorial borders of the state. This paper argues that far from undermining the sovereignty of nation-states, efforts by governments of migrant source countries to institutionally embrace their citizens and co-ethnics abroad highlight the robustness of the nation-state system based on the Westphalian principle of territorial sovereignty. Indeed, Westphalian sovereignty at the turn of the twenty-first century is strengthening in ways that causes source country governments to renegotiate the terms of the social contract between emigrants and the sending state. This new social contract emphasizes voluntaristic ties, a menu of options for expressing membership, an emphasis on rights over obligations, and the legitimacy of plural legal and affective national affiliations.

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Citizenship à la Carte: Emigration and the Sovereign State – Professor David FitzGerald

Skrentny featured at the Program in Law and Public Affairs, Princeton University

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“After Civil Rights: Race, Immigration and Law in the American Workplace” is the title of Director John Skrentny‘s seminar at the Program in Law and Public Affairs, located at Princeton University.  Read more about Prof. Skrentny’s talk:

“Can civil rights law provide equal job opportunity to people of all races and ethnicities, as well as prevent exploitation, in 21st century America?  In 1964, Congress passed Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to eliminate widespread racial discrimination, segregation and hierarchy in the workplace.  Almost half a century later, and after decades of mass immigration, these are all still widespread and arguably more complex and entrenched than before.  In this paper,adapted from a book chapter in progress, I document employers’ racial and ethnic stereotypes that lead employers to prefer Latino and Asian workers while discriminating against Black and White workers.  With a special focus on the meat-packing industry, which increasingly resembles that described by Upton Sinclair a century ago in The Jungle, I also show the ways these Latino workers are in turn segregated and exploited.  Finally, I explore the failure of discrimination law to provide relief, and probe alternatives to protect workers of all backgrounds.  Civil rights law– as currently interpreted in the courts–does surprisingly little to prevent racial and ethnic hierarchy in the nation’s workplaces.”

Richard Alba – Blurring the Color Line: The New Chance for a More Integrated America

Richard Alba, Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center, presented his new book Blurring the Color Line: The New Chance for a More Integrated America at this CCIS research seminar October 20th. The audio of his talk is available below or subscribe to our podcast to automatically receive audio of CCIS research seminars.

 
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The next quarter century will offer an unusual chance to undermine ethno-racial divisions and to narrow the social cleavages that separate Americans into distinct and unequal ethno-racial groups. This little-comprehended opportunity will arise from a massive and predictable demographic process: the exodus from the labor market of the baby boom. The turnover in the labor market will produce what might be called “non-zero-sum” mobility: a situation where minorities can advance socioeconomically without threatening very much the opportunities that whites take for granted for themselves and their children.

Non-zero-sum mobility is a critical element in new theory of ethno-racial change. We can identify the empirical foundations for the theory by looking back to another period of profound social change: the mass assimilation of the so-called white ethnics, Irish Catholics and southern and eastern European Catholics, Orthodox Christians and Jews, in the decades following World War II. These changes also took place during a period of massive non-zero-sum-mobility, originating then in an extraordinary period of prosperity.

However, for minorities to be able to benefit from the opportunity ahead, the nation will have to address the barriers that stand in their way. It is worthwhile nevertheless to attempt to envision how ethno-racial distinctions might appear if U.S. society becomes much more diverse in its middle and upper strata.


richard-alba-full-headshotThe seeds of Richard Alba’s interest in ethnicity were sown during his childhood in the Bronx of the 1940s and 1950s and nurtured intellectually at Columbia University, where he received his undergraduate and graduate education, completing his Ph.D. in 1974. He is currently Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Besides ethnicity, his teaching and research focus on international migration in the U.S. and in Europe, and he has done research in France and in Germany, with the support of Fulbright grants and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the German Marshall Fund, and Russell Sage Foundation. His books include Ethnic Identity: The Transformation of White America (1990); Italian Americans: Into the Twilight of Ethnicity (1985); Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration (2003), written with Victor Nee; and, most recently, Blurring the Color Line: The New Chance for a More Integrated America (September, 2009).

He has been elected President of the Eastern Sociological Society (1997-98) and Vice President of the American Sociological Association (2000-01).

Cornelius Speaks at University of Chicago

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CCIS Director Emeritus Wayne Cornelius delivered the Fourth Annual Pastora San Juan Cafferty Lecture on Race and Ethnicity in American Life, at the University of Chicago on October 1. His lecture was titled “Toward a Smarter and More Just U.S. Immigration Policy: What Mexican Migrants Can Tell Us.”

Listen to the full audio of Cornelius’ speech below or download the full text.

 

Border Crosser Deaths Rising, Despite Reduction In Illegal Immigration (KPBS)

kpbs_logo2_2Speaking on the KPBS program These Days, KPBS reporter cited research from the Mexican Migration Field Research program: “… Where there’s a will, there’s a way, and people cross the border even who know that – Wayne Cornelius from UCSD did a study recently and he was down in the Yucatan talking to migrants who wanted to – who were thinking about crossing and about more than 40% of them knew someone who had died crossing the border and the grand majority of them said we know it’s difficult and we know that it’s hard to get around the Border Patrol but, they said, regardless of that, they’re going to do it.”

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