Center of Expertise on Migration and Health Call for Paper Proposals

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The UC Center of Expertise on Migration and Health (COEMH), a component of the UC-wide Global Health Institute, is a ten-campus, interdisciplinary program whose mission is to improve health and eliminate health disparities of international migrants, refugees, and internally displaced people around the world. The COEMH will hold its first annual, interdisciplinary Research Training Workshop on May 13-14 at UC San Diego. The workshop will serve as a showcase for research being undertaken by graduate students and recent postdoctoral scholars throughout the UC system relating to migration and health. Graduate students and postdocs will present their current or recently completed research (thesis proposals are acceptable). UC faculty members will serve as discussants, providing expert feedback on the students’ work and commenting on its relevance to their own research. Additional mentoring will be provided through one-on-one meetings between participating students and faculty members. A selection of papers presented at the workshop will be published electronically as COEMH Working Papers and edited for publication as a special issue of a peer- reviewed journal. A prize for the best paper will also be awarded.

Approximately 30 graduate students and postdocs and 15 faculty members will participate in the workshop. Research topics to be discussed include:

  • Behavioral and socio-economic determinants of migrants’ health
  • Occupational and environmental health issues confronting migrants
  • Health issues for children in immigrant families • Health outcomes in migrants’ communities of origin and destination
  • Health care delivery and policy issues

Who can participate

Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars based at all UC campuses, including professional school students, are invited to apply for admission to the Workshop. The organizing committee will select up to 30 student participants, based on the quality of proposals, their relevance to COEMH research objectives, and disciplinary, geographic, and gender representation. Non-local participants may request financial support to cover their travel and lodging expenses.

How to apply

By March 15, send a proposal containing the following elements to: Micah Gell-Redman, COEMH Graduate Research Assistant, micah.gr@gmail.com

  • Description of your research project (2 – 5 pages)
  • Your curriculum vitae
  • Letter of support from your principal faculty mentor
  • Request for travel and lodging support, if needed

All documents should be submitted in electronic form. Applicants will be notified by April 15.

Baja smugglers’ use of boats rising rapidly (San Diego Union Tribune)

“…The deaths of two immigrants after an overcrowded smuggling vessel capsized off Torrey Pines State Beach on Jan. 16 highlighted the area’s status as a maritime corridor for the illicit traffic of people and drugs. The two victims, a man from Mexico and a woman from Guatemala, are the first known maritime smuggling fatalities in San Diego County.

‘It was totally predictable,’ said Wayne Cornelius, director emeritus of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California San Diego. ‘People always underestimate the determination of the migrants themselves, and the creativity of the professional people smugglers.’”

Read the full article »

Obama’s choices during first year in office resonate in San Diego (San Diego News Network)


“John Skrentny, director of UC San Diego’s Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, noted that if there’s one thing that has happened with immigration reform, it may be a lack of momentum.

‘I would say that the Obama administration has lost a lot of its momentum while trying to repair the economy and get through with the agenda on health care,’ Skrentny said. ‘The progress Obama has made on immigration will be harder to follow through because of the lost momentum.’”

Read the full article »

Wayne Cornelius Featured on 60 Minutes

CCIS Emeritus Director Wayne Cornelius was featured on CBS’s 60 Minutes program recently, talking about the virtual fence being built on the U.S.-Mexico border.

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“It’s a great deal for Boeing and its subcontractors. It’s a bad deal for the taxpayers,” Wayne Cornelius, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, told Kroft.

There are some, like Cornelius, who think the virtual fence provides only the illusion of border security. He has studied and written about the border for years and says the only thing that has ever stopped people from illegally entering the United States from Mexico was the Great Depression.

“They will detour around the electronic fence just as they have detoured around sections of the physical fences that have been built since 1993. They would be crazy not to,” Cornelius said.

He says smugglers are already probing the system for weaknesses, and will eventually figure out ways to sabotage or blind the electronic towers.

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Video of the entire 60 Minutes segment:


Watch CBS News Videos Online

Web-only video of Cornelius talking about the virtual fence:


Watch CBS News Videos Online

Marisa Abrajano – Latinos and the 2008 Elections in California

Marisa Abrajano – Latinos and the 2008 Elections in California
 

Listen above to the Research Seminar given by Marisa Abrajano on January 12, 2010. We also encourage you to subscribe to our CCIS Podcast and listen to all of our research seminars for free!


Similar to the outcomes in both the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections, California was expected to be a solidly blue state in the 2008 presidential race. What makes this presidential election distinct from previous ones, however, is the significant role that California played in the democratic nomination process. For the first time in the modern day presidential nomination process, the state’s fastest growing share of the electorate, Latinos, were given the opportunity to express their political preferences in a meaningful and important way. This paper examines the factors influencing Latino vote choice in the 2008 Democratic and Republican presidential primaries. Can Latino vote choice be explained in the same manner as non-Latinos? Do potential distinctions in the information they receive (e.g. political ads, the media) affect their vote decisions in any way? In the months that followed California’s primary election, Latino voters remained in the spotlight, though not with respect to the presidential race. Instead, the importance of capturing the Latino vote turned to Proposition 8, a ballot initiative that would amend the California constitution to ban same sex-marriage in the state.

Paper co-authored with Fernando Guerra, Professor of Political Science at Loyola Marymount University

Marisa Abrajano, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego; CCIS Visiting Fellow

Marisa Abrajano is an assistant professor in the department of political science at the University of California, San Diego. She received her Ph.D. in politics from New York University in 2005. Her research interests are in American politics, particularly in the areas of campaigns, mass electoral behavior, Latino politics, and racial/ethnic politics. She is the author of two forthcoming books: Campaigning to the New American Electorate: Television Advertising to Latinos (Stanford University Press) and New Faces, New Voices: The Hispanic Electorate in America (with R. Michael Alvarez) published by Princeton University Press. Her other work has been published in The Journal of PoliticsPolitical Research QuarterlyAmerican Politics Research and Political Behavior.

CCIS Announces Winter Quarter Research Seminar Series Schedule

All seminars start at 2:00 in the Eleanor Roosevelt Administration Building Conference Room.

January 12, 2010

Latinos and the 2008 Elections in California (co-authored with Fernando Guerra, Professor of Political Science at Loyola Marymount University)

Marisa Abrajano, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego; CCIS Visiting Fellow

February 2, 2010

Birth Rates and Border Crossings: The Demographic Push Behind Emigration in the Americas (co-authored with Craig McIntosh, Associate Professor, Department of Economics and School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego)

Gordon Hanson, Professor, Department of Economics and School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego

Discussant: Frank Bean, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Irvine

March 2, 2010

The Social and Economic Integration of Mexican Immigrants in Los Angeles (co-authored with Luis Escala Rabadan and Olga Odgers, Colegio de la Fronte Norte)

Rafael Alarcón, Research Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Colegio de la Frontera Norte

March 16, 2010

Self-Selection and Liquidity Constraints in Different Migration Cost Regimes

Scott Borger, Economist, Office of Immigration Statistics, U.S. Department of Homeland Security