David FitzGerald Interviewed by Council on Foreign Relations

CCIS Associate Director David FitzGerald was interviewed recently by the Council on Foreign Relations. Speaking about “The Immigration Economy” FitzGerald said:

“The overall influence of unauthorized immigration on the U.S. economy is quite small, though it is signficant in sectors like agriculture, construction, and the hospitality sector, which rely on low-skilled labor. While unauthorized migration has a slighly depressive effect on the wages of unskilled native workers, only 8 percent of the total hours worked in the U.S. in 2007 were performed by people with less than a high school education. In fact, unauthorized immigrant labor is generally complementary to native-born labor. Unemployed auto workers in Michigan are not migrating to California to pick fruit.”

Read full interview »

University of California International Migration Conference

Introduction and Panel 1. Ethnicity and the Politics of Immigration
 

Panel 2. Assimilation and Transnationalism
 

Panel 3. Immigration and the Welfare State
 

Panel 4. Immigration Law and Control
 


On March 12, 2010, CCIS will host a University of California-wide conference on international migration. Panels are listed below.

If you are interested in attending the conference, please contact Ana Minvielle, aminvielle@ucsd.edu.

The conference will be held in the Deutz Conference Room of the Institute of the Americas. For directions, please visit the IOA website.

Sponsored by CCIS, The Gifford Center for Population Studies at UC Davis, the Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy at UC Irvine, and UCLA Migration Study Group

Introduction (8:30 – 8:45 AM)

  • David FitzGerald and John Skrentny, CCIS, UCSD

Panel 1. Ethnicity and the Politics of Immigration (8:45 – 10:30 AM)

  • Immigration and the Political Transformation of White America: How Local Immigrant Context Shapes White Policy Views and Partisanship. Marisa Abrajano, Political Science, UCSD
  • Beyond the Ballot: Immigration Collective Action in Traditional and New Destinations in the U.S. Dina Okamoto, Sociology, UC Davis
  • Immigration Reforms and Immigrant/Ethnic Community Politics: Immigrant Generation and Latino Policy Preferences on Immigration Reform. Louis DeSipio, Political Science, UC Irvine
  • “In A Race All Their Own”: The Quest to Make Mexicans Ineligible for U.S. Citizenship. Natalia Molina, Ethnic Studies, UCSD
  • Chair and Discussant: Zoltan Hajnal, Political Science, UCSD

Break (10:30 – 11:00 AM)

Panel 2. Assimilation and Transnationalism (11:00 AM-12:45 PM)

  • Inheriting the homeland?: Intergenerational transmission of cross-border ties in migrant families. Thomas Soehl, Sociology, UCLA
  • A Rhizomatic Diaspora: Transnational Passage and the Sense of Place among Koreans in Latin America. Kyeyoung Park, Anthropology, UCLA
  • Between “Europe” and “Africa”: Building the “New” Ukraine on the Shoulders of Migrant Women. Cinzia Solari, Sociology, UC Berkeley
  • Chair and Discussant: Erin Hamilton, Sociology, UC Davis

Panel 3. Immigration and the Welfare State (1:45-3:30 PM)

  • Children of Immigrants in U.S. Schools: Today’s English Learners, Tomorrow’s Workforce. April Linton, Sociology, UC San Diego
  • Immigration and the Welfare State: Diversity, Public Assistance and Immigrant Incorporation. Frank Bean, Sociology, UC Irvine
  • A New Nativism or an American Tradition? Federal Citizenship and Legal Status Restrictions for Medicaid and Welfare. Cybelle Fox, Sociology, UC Berkeley
  • Chair and Discussant: Micah Gell-Redman, Political Science, UCSD

Break (3:30-4:00 PM)

Panel 4. Immigration Law and Control (4:00-5:45 PM)

  • Race and Immigration Law in the Americas, 1850-2000. David FitzGerald, Sociology, UCSD
  • A Global Documentary Regime? Regulating Mobility from the Developing World. Kamal Sadiq, Political Science, UC Irvine
  • A Diversion of Attention?: Immigration Courts and the Adjudication of Fourth and Fifth Amendment Rights. Jennifer M. Chacón, Law, UC Irvine
  • Chair and Discussant: David Kyle, Sociology, UC Davis

Note: This event is not sponsored by the Institute of the Americas

Border Boletín: Smugglers take to the seas (Arizona Daily Star)

CCIS Director Emeritus Wayne Cornelius was quoted recently in the Arizona Daily Star in an article about clandestine crossings by sea:

At least one expert predicted this development. In the fall of 2006 when I spoke to him, Wayne Cornelius, head of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California at San Diego, forecasted the shift to the seas.

Cornelius’ quote appears at the end of this excerpt below from a story published in the Arizona Daily Star on Sept. 27, 2006. The story ran on the final day of a multi-day series about the U.S. government’s efforts to seal the U.S.-Mexico border. (Sorry but I can’t post the full link to the story because it is temporarily down)

“The expansive waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean flank the nearly 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexican border.

Forty-three legal ports of entry line the southern border, where 5,049 U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers face the grueling task of finding illegal entrants hidden in the sea of 960,000 people who cross daily.

The Canadian border is twice as long, but patrolled by one-tenth as many U.S. Border Patrol agents.

The areas serve as sidelines in the match of vigor and wit that pits illegal entrants against agents. But if the federal government spends the billions of dollars and overcomes the bevy of logistical obstacles to sealing the border, all three would become important corridors, experts say.

As long as U.S. businesses offer better jobs than those available at home, illegal entrants will keep finding new ways into the country, a Star investigation found.

“The costs of a 2,000-mile seal of the land border are prohibitively high,” says Wayne Cornelius, head of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California at San Diego. “And the punchline is that it wouldn’t be effective because it would just divert crossings to the maritime border and the northern border, unless the jobs disappear within the U.S.”

Read full article »

Rafael Alarcón and Luis Escala-Rabadán – The Social and Economic Integration of Mexican Immigrants in Los Angeles

Begins at 2:00 in the Eleanor Roosevelt Administration Building Conference Room

Abstract: Mexicans constitute the largest immigrant group in the United States. However, their social and economic integration reveals several limitations due to the large number of the undocumented as well as the low percentage of those who have naturalized, and thus, exercise their rights as citizens. In addition, most Mexican immigrants have a comparatively lower educational attainment and have access to low paying employment.

The main purpose of this presentation is to discuss the extent of social and economic integration of Mexican immigrants in the Los Angeles metropolitan area using a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. Data from the 2007 American Community Survey and 90 open-ended interviews with adult Mexican immigrants will be used to examine the economic, social, cultural and political factors that promote or limit the integration of immigrants. The interviews were conducted in 2008 with immigrants from the Mexican states of Zacatecas, Oaxaca, and Veracruz who have settled in the Los Angeles Metropolitan area at different times and historical circumstances.

Rafael Alarcón, Research Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Colegio de la Frontera Norte (Mexico)

Rafael Alarcón is research professor in the Department of Social Studies at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte in Tijuana, Mexico and holds a Ph D. in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley. He was the founding editor of Migraciones Internacionales and is an specialist on international migration, Professor Alarcon has conducted research on the economic and social impacts of migration in sending and receiving regions in Mexico and the United States, the integration of Mexican immigrants in the United States and the role of skilled immigrants in Silicon Valley.

Luis Escala-Rabadán, Research Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Colegio de la Frontera Norte (Mexico)

Luis Escala-Rabadán is a sociologist who completed his doctorate in Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests bring together the sociology of culture and the sociology of migration. His past work has included the study of transnational communities, political participation, and the different types of organizations and groups among Mexican migrants in the United States. He is currently on the research faculty of the Department of Social Studies and Chair of the Master’s Program in Sociocultural Studies at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte in Tijuana, Baja California, in Mexico.

Race, Immigration and the Law of the Workplace: 21st Century Challenges

Download full-size PDF of flyer »

The objective of this conference, which will take place on February 26 and 27, 2010 at Princeton, is to bring together scholars engaging in the intersections of law, immigration, race and the workplace. Mass immigration has had a huge impact on labor, on citizenship, on understandings of race and ethnicity, and on American politics. The law has been evolving as well. We will bring together a group of social scientists and legal scholars in these areas to create a dialog among those whose interests intersect but for professional reasons rarely interact. This conference is co-sponsored by the Princeton University Program in Law and Public Affairs, where it will be held.

Immigration and the new dynamics of employment discrimination

  • Jennifer Gordon, Fordham Law School
  • Robin Lenhardt, Fordham Law School
  • Jennifer Lee, UC Irvine Sociology
  • Tomás Jiménez, Stanford University, Sociology
  • Deborah Malamud, NYU Law School

Immigration and the challenge to labor unions

  • Dorian Warren, Columbia University, Political Science
  • Ruben Garcia, California-Western Law School
  • Ruth Milkman, Hunter College, City University of New York, Sociology
  • Janice Fine, Rutgers School of Management

Immigration and the meaning of citizenship

  • Cristina Rodriguez, NYU Law School
  • Linda Bosniak, Rutgers Law School
  • Mae Ngai, Columbia University, History
  • Desmond King, Oxford University, Politics

Policy prospects in the age of Obama

  • Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt History
  • Jennifer Hochschild, Harvard University, Government
  • Michael Jones-Correa, Princeton, Center for the Study of Democratic Politics
  • Glenn Loury, Brown University, Economics
  • Mark Sawyer, UCLA, Political Science