Rafael Alarcón and Luis Escala-Rabadán – The Social and Economic Integration of Mexican Immigrants in Los Angeles

Begins at 2:00 in the Eleanor Roosevelt Administration Building Conference Room

Abstract: Mexicans constitute the largest immigrant group in the United States. However, their social and economic integration reveals several limitations due to the large number of the undocumented as well as the low percentage of those who have naturalized, and thus, exercise their rights as citizens. In addition, most Mexican immigrants have a comparatively lower educational attainment and have access to low paying employment.

The main purpose of this presentation is to discuss the extent of social and economic integration of Mexican immigrants in the Los Angeles metropolitan area using a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. Data from the 2007 American Community Survey and 90 open-ended interviews with adult Mexican immigrants will be used to examine the economic, social, cultural and political factors that promote or limit the integration of immigrants. The interviews were conducted in 2008 with immigrants from the Mexican states of Zacatecas, Oaxaca, and Veracruz who have settled in the Los Angeles Metropolitan area at different times and historical circumstances.

Rafael Alarcón, Research Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Colegio de la Frontera Norte (Mexico)

Rafael Alarcón is research professor in the Department of Social Studies at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte in Tijuana, Mexico and holds a Ph D. in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley. He was the founding editor of Migraciones Internacionales and is an specialist on international migration, Professor Alarcon has conducted research on the economic and social impacts of migration in sending and receiving regions in Mexico and the United States, the integration of Mexican immigrants in the United States and the role of skilled immigrants in Silicon Valley.

Luis Escala-Rabadán, Research Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Colegio de la Frontera Norte (Mexico)

Luis Escala-Rabadán is a sociologist who completed his doctorate in Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests bring together the sociology of culture and the sociology of migration. His past work has included the study of transnational communities, political participation, and the different types of organizations and groups among Mexican migrants in the United States. He is currently on the research faculty of the Department of Social Studies and Chair of the Master’s Program in Sociocultural Studies at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte in Tijuana, Baja California, in Mexico.

Race, Immigration and the Law of the Workplace: 21st Century Challenges

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The objective of this conference, which will take place on February 26 and 27, 2010 at Princeton, is to bring together scholars engaging in the intersections of law, immigration, race and the workplace. Mass immigration has had a huge impact on labor, on citizenship, on understandings of race and ethnicity, and on American politics. The law has been evolving as well. We will bring together a group of social scientists and legal scholars in these areas to create a dialog among those whose interests intersect but for professional reasons rarely interact. This conference is co-sponsored by the Princeton University Program in Law and Public Affairs, where it will be held.

Immigration and the new dynamics of employment discrimination

  • Jennifer Gordon, Fordham Law School
  • Robin Lenhardt, Fordham Law School
  • Jennifer Lee, UC Irvine Sociology
  • Tomás Jiménez, Stanford University, Sociology
  • Deborah Malamud, NYU Law School

Immigration and the challenge to labor unions

  • Dorian Warren, Columbia University, Political Science
  • Ruben Garcia, California-Western Law School
  • Ruth Milkman, Hunter College, City University of New York, Sociology
  • Janice Fine, Rutgers School of Management

Immigration and the meaning of citizenship

  • Cristina Rodriguez, NYU Law School
  • Linda Bosniak, Rutgers Law School
  • Mae Ngai, Columbia University, History
  • Desmond King, Oxford University, Politics

Policy prospects in the age of Obama

  • Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt History
  • Jennifer Hochschild, Harvard University, Government
  • Michael Jones-Correa, Princeton, Center for the Study of Democratic Politics
  • Glenn Loury, Brown University, Economics
  • Mark Sawyer, UCLA, Political Science

Center of Expertise on Migration and Health Call for Paper Proposals

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The UC Center of Expertise on Migration and Health (COEMH), a component of the UC-wide Global Health Institute, is a ten-campus, interdisciplinary program whose mission is to improve health and eliminate health disparities of international migrants, refugees, and internally displaced people around the world. The COEMH will hold its first annual, interdisciplinary Research Training Workshop on May 13-14 at UC San Diego. The workshop will serve as a showcase for research being undertaken by graduate students and recent postdoctoral scholars throughout the UC system relating to migration and health. Graduate students and postdocs will present their current or recently completed research (thesis proposals are acceptable). UC faculty members will serve as discussants, providing expert feedback on the students’ work and commenting on its relevance to their own research. Additional mentoring will be provided through one-on-one meetings between participating students and faculty members. A selection of papers presented at the workshop will be published electronically as COEMH Working Papers and edited for publication as a special issue of a peer- reviewed journal. A prize for the best paper will also be awarded.

Approximately 30 graduate students and postdocs and 15 faculty members will participate in the workshop. Research topics to be discussed include:

  • Behavioral and socio-economic determinants of migrants’ health
  • Occupational and environmental health issues confronting migrants
  • Health issues for children in immigrant families • Health outcomes in migrants’ communities of origin and destination
  • Health care delivery and policy issues

Who can participate

Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars based at all UC campuses, including professional school students, are invited to apply for admission to the Workshop. The organizing committee will select up to 30 student participants, based on the quality of proposals, their relevance to COEMH research objectives, and disciplinary, geographic, and gender representation. Non-local participants may request financial support to cover their travel and lodging expenses.

How to apply

By March 15, send a proposal containing the following elements to: Micah Gell-Redman, COEMH Graduate Research Assistant, micah.gr@gmail.com

  • Description of your research project (2 – 5 pages)
  • Your curriculum vitae
  • Letter of support from your principal faculty mentor
  • Request for travel and lodging support, if needed

All documents should be submitted in electronic form. Applicants will be notified by April 15.

Baja smugglers’ use of boats rising rapidly (San Diego Union Tribune)

“…The deaths of two immigrants after an overcrowded smuggling vessel capsized off Torrey Pines State Beach on Jan. 16 highlighted the area’s status as a maritime corridor for the illicit traffic of people and drugs. The two victims, a man from Mexico and a woman from Guatemala, are the first known maritime smuggling fatalities in San Diego County.

‘It was totally predictable,’ said Wayne Cornelius, director emeritus of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California San Diego. ‘People always underestimate the determination of the migrants themselves, and the creativity of the professional people smugglers.’”

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