Marisa Abrajano – Latinos and the 2008 Elections in California

Marisa Abrajano – Latinos and the 2008 Elections in California
 

Listen above to the Research Seminar given by Marisa Abrajano on January 12, 2010. We also encourage you to subscribe to our CCIS Podcast and listen to all of our research seminars for free!


Similar to the outcomes in both the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections, California was expected to be a solidly blue state in the 2008 presidential race. What makes this presidential election distinct from previous ones, however, is the significant role that California played in the democratic nomination process. For the first time in the modern day presidential nomination process, the state’s fastest growing share of the electorate, Latinos, were given the opportunity to express their political preferences in a meaningful and important way. This paper examines the factors influencing Latino vote choice in the 2008 Democratic and Republican presidential primaries. Can Latino vote choice be explained in the same manner as non-Latinos? Do potential distinctions in the information they receive (e.g. political ads, the media) affect their vote decisions in any way? In the months that followed California’s primary election, Latino voters remained in the spotlight, though not with respect to the presidential race. Instead, the importance of capturing the Latino vote turned to Proposition 8, a ballot initiative that would amend the California constitution to ban same sex-marriage in the state.

Paper co-authored with Fernando Guerra, Professor of Political Science at Loyola Marymount University

Marisa Abrajano, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego; CCIS Visiting Fellow

Marisa Abrajano is an assistant professor in the department of political science at the University of California, San Diego. She received her Ph.D. in politics from New York University in 2005. Her research interests are in American politics, particularly in the areas of campaigns, mass electoral behavior, Latino politics, and racial/ethnic politics. She is the author of two forthcoming books: Campaigning to the New American Electorate: Television Advertising to Latinos (Stanford University Press) and New Faces, New Voices: The Hispanic Electorate in America (with R. Michael Alvarez) published by Princeton University Press. Her other work has been published in The Journal of PoliticsPolitical Research QuarterlyAmerican Politics Research and Political Behavior.

CCIS Announces Winter Quarter Research Seminar Series Schedule

All seminars start at 2:00 in the Eleanor Roosevelt Administration Building Conference Room.

January 12, 2010

Latinos and the 2008 Elections in California (co-authored with Fernando Guerra, Professor of Political Science at Loyola Marymount University)

Marisa Abrajano, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego; CCIS Visiting Fellow

February 2, 2010

Birth Rates and Border Crossings: The Demographic Push Behind Emigration in the Americas (co-authored with Craig McIntosh, Associate Professor, Department of Economics and School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego)

Gordon Hanson, Professor, Department of Economics and School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego

Discussant: Frank Bean, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Irvine

March 2, 2010

The Social and Economic Integration of Mexican Immigrants in Los Angeles (co-authored with Luis Escala Rabadan and Olga Odgers, Colegio de la Fronte Norte)

Rafael Alarcón, Research Professor, Department of Social Sciences, Colegio de la Frontera Norte

March 16, 2010

Self-Selection and Liquidity Constraints in Different Migration Cost Regimes

Scott Borger, Economist, Office of Immigration Statistics, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Detentions at Border Are Down (New York Times)

new-york-times-logo

“… Some researchers have cautioned that border enforcement would not prevent Latino immigrants from returning if the economy picked up. Based on the pattern of past recessions, ‘full economic recovery is likely to bring a quick rebound in northbound migration,’ said Wayne Cornelius, who recently retired as director of an immigration research center at the University of California San Diego …”

Read the full article »

University Launches Global Health Program (UCSD Guardian)

ucsd-guardian-logo“In an effort to address some of the health ramifications of California’s large immigrant population, the University of California launched the Center of Expertise on Migration and Health on Nov. 9 — part of its new Global Health Institute.

The COEMH, to be located at UCSD, was created to examine the impact that large population movements have on both the destination country and the migrating population’s country of origin. The program will pay particular attention to consequences that changes in federal health-care policy have on California’s refugee and immigrant population … ”

Read the full article »

Mexican Migration and the Economic Crisis Released

The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies announces the publication of the first fieldwork-based study of the impacts of the U.S. economic crisis on Mexican migration to the United States:

economic-crisis(distributed by Lynne Rienner Publishers)
Edited by Wayne A. Cornelius, David FitzGerald, Pedro Lewin, and Leah Muse-Orlinoff
2009, 276 pages, paperback

Based on 1,031 survey interviews and more than 500 hours of in-depth unstructured interviewing, on both sides of the border, this volume is the first fieldwork-based study of how the U.S. economic crisis that erupted in 2007 has affected flows of Mexican migrants to and from the United States. Focusing on Tunkás, a migrant-sending community in rural Yucatán that they first studied in 2006, and its satellite communities in southern California, the researchers find that it is the combination of poor job prospects in the United States with higher costs of migration (mainly, people-smugglers’ fees) that has discouraged new migration in recent years, among both legal and unauthorized migrants. They also find that neither the economic crisis nor workplace raids and other forms of interior enforcement are inducing large numbers of migrants already in the United States to go home. The researchers document the strategies that have been developed by migrants and their dependents in Mexico to cope with the economic crisis, how migrants navigate the contracting U.S. labor market, and how the economic crisis is affecting health, education, and community participation on both sides of the border. A ground-breaking chapter shows how a “youth culture of migration” develops in a migrant-sending community. This volume is the fifth in a series based on the research of the Mexican Migration Field Research and Training Program at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, UC San Diego.

More information about Mexican Migration and the Economic Crisis »

FitzGerald featured twice at Social Science History Association’s Annual Conference

SocialScienceHistoryAssc CCIS Associate Director David FitzGerald will be featured twice at the Social Science History Association‘s annual conference.   On Saturday, November 14, FitzGerald’s newest book, A Nation of Emigrants: How Mexico Manages its Migration is being discussed in an Author Meets Critics session.  Later that afternoon, FitzGerald will present in the session titled Law and Policies for Migrants and Refugees”  with other scholars including David Cook Martin, Simon Wegge, and Craig Bailey.

Karthick Ramakrishnan – Going Local: The New Politics of Immigration in the United States

Immigration policy in the United States has largely been the purview of the federal government, with rules establishing who is eligible to enter the United States, the terms of such entry, and the conditions under which immigrants may become citizens. In the past decade, low-skilled migrant labor in the United States has reached new destinations, ranging from rural Kansas and North Carolina to suburbs in Long Island and Georgia. These settlement patterns have brought new attention to issues such as day labor, unlicensed businesses, overcrowded housing, and illegal immigration. They have also raised concerns over issues of representation and political assimilation among communities characterized by low rates of citizenship and low levels of English proficiency. Finally, with immigration reform unresolved at the federal level, states and local governments have taken the initiative in passing their own legislation that would explicitly make the livelihood of immigration more difficult or less so.

Despite their pressing importance, these issues of immigrant political assimilation and local government responses have yet to be systematically examined, and especially so in smaller cities and in newer immigrant destinations. This book examines variation in state and local government policies and practices related to low-skill immigrant labor in the United States. It begins by exploring the evolution of immigration policy since 1965, with provisions in 1994 and 1996 as especially important in setting the stage for state and local government involvement in immigration policies. The book then uses a combination of large-scale statistical analysis and qualitative methods to explore: 1) how state and local governments have varied in their involvement in policies that explicitly target immigrants, 2) how these policies have been covered in the news, and 3) how the general public, and immigrants in particular, view these developments.


Karthick-Ramakrishnan-bw

Karthick Ramakrishnan is associate professor of political science at the University of California, Riverside. His research focuses on civic participation, immigration policy, and the politics of race, ethnicity, and immigration in the United States. Ramakrishnan is one of the principal investigators for the 2008 National Asian American Survey, the first of its kind conducted at the national level.

Ramakrishnan received his Ph.D. in politics from Princeton University, and has held fellowships at the Russell Sage Foundation and the Public Policy Institute of California. He has received several grants from sources such as the James Irvine Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation, and has provided consultation to public officials at the federal and local levels.

Ramakrishnan’s articles have appeared in International Migration Review, Urban Affairs Review, Social Science Quarterly, and The DuBois Review. He is also the author of Democracy in Immigrant America (Stanford University Press, 2005), and is an editor of two volumes on immigrant politics and civic engagement: Transforming Politics, Transforming America (University of Virginia Press, 2006) and Civic Roots and Political Realities: Immigrants, Community Organizations, and Political Engagement (Russell Sage Foundation, 2008).