Center of Expertise on Migration and Health Call for Paper Proposals

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The UC Center of Expertise on Migration and Health (COEMH), a component of the UC-wide Global Health Institute, is a ten-campus, interdisciplinary program whose mission is to improve health and eliminate health disparities of international migrants, refugees, and internally displaced people around the world. The COEMH will hold its first annual, interdisciplinary Research Training Workshop on May 13-14 at UC San Diego. The workshop will serve as a showcase for research being undertaken by graduate students and recent postdoctoral scholars throughout the UC system relating to migration and health. Graduate students and postdocs will present their current or recently completed research (thesis proposals are acceptable). UC faculty members will serve as discussants, providing expert feedback on the students’ work and commenting on its relevance to their own research. Additional mentoring will be provided through one-on-one meetings between participating students and faculty members. A selection of papers presented at the workshop will be published electronically as COEMH Working Papers and edited for publication as a special issue of a peer- reviewed journal. A prize for the best paper will also be awarded.

Approximately 30 graduate students and postdocs and 15 faculty members will participate in the workshop. Research topics to be discussed include:

  • Behavioral and socio-economic determinants of migrants’ health
  • Occupational and environmental health issues confronting migrants
  • Health issues for children in immigrant families • Health outcomes in migrants’ communities of origin and destination
  • Health care delivery and policy issues

Who can participate

Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars based at all UC campuses, including professional school students, are invited to apply for admission to the Workshop. The organizing committee will select up to 30 student participants, based on the quality of proposals, their relevance to COEMH research objectives, and disciplinary, geographic, and gender representation. Non-local participants may request financial support to cover their travel and lodging expenses.

How to apply

By March 15, send a proposal containing the following elements to: Micah Gell-Redman, COEMH Graduate Research Assistant, micah.gr@gmail.com

  • Description of your research project (2 – 5 pages)
  • Your curriculum vitae
  • Letter of support from your principal faculty mentor
  • Request for travel and lodging support, if needed

All documents should be submitted in electronic form. Applicants will be notified by April 15.

Baja smugglers’ use of boats rising rapidly (San Diego Union Tribune)

“…The deaths of two immigrants after an overcrowded smuggling vessel capsized off Torrey Pines State Beach on Jan. 16 highlighted the area’s status as a maritime corridor for the illicit traffic of people and drugs. The two victims, a man from Mexico and a woman from Guatemala, are the first known maritime smuggling fatalities in San Diego County.

‘It was totally predictable,’ said Wayne Cornelius, director emeritus of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California San Diego. ‘People always underestimate the determination of the migrants themselves, and the creativity of the professional people smugglers.’”

Read the full article »

Obama’s choices during first year in office resonate in San Diego (San Diego News Network)


“John Skrentny, director of UC San Diego’s Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, noted that if there’s one thing that has happened with immigration reform, it may be a lack of momentum.

‘I would say that the Obama administration has lost a lot of its momentum while trying to repair the economy and get through with the agenda on health care,’ Skrentny said. ‘The progress Obama has made on immigration will be harder to follow through because of the lost momentum.’”

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Wayne Cornelius Featured on 60 Minutes

CCIS Emeritus Director Wayne Cornelius was featured on CBS’s 60 Minutes program recently, talking about the virtual fence being built on the U.S.-Mexico border.

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“It’s a great deal for Boeing and its subcontractors. It’s a bad deal for the taxpayers,” Wayne Cornelius, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, told Kroft.

There are some, like Cornelius, who think the virtual fence provides only the illusion of border security. He has studied and written about the border for years and says the only thing that has ever stopped people from illegally entering the United States from Mexico was the Great Depression.

“They will detour around the electronic fence just as they have detoured around sections of the physical fences that have been built since 1993. They would be crazy not to,” Cornelius said.

He says smugglers are already probing the system for weaknesses, and will eventually figure out ways to sabotage or blind the electronic towers.

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Video of the entire 60 Minutes segment:


Watch CBS News Videos Online

Web-only video of Cornelius talking about the virtual fence:


Watch CBS News Videos Online