Aarti Kohli – Operation Streamline: Assembly-Line Justice at the Border

Aarti Kohli – Operation Streamline: Assembly-Line Justice at the Border
 

Please listen (above) to the Research Seminar given by Aarti Kohli on May 18, 2010. We also encourage you to subscribe to our CCIS Podcast and listen to all of our research seminars for free!


Aarti Kohli, director of immigration policy at the Warren Institute, will discuss a recent research project examining a Department of Homeland Security program that requires the federal criminal prosecution and imprisonment of all unlawful border crossers. The program, known as Operation Streamline, mainly targets migrant workers with no criminal history and has resulted in skyrocketing caseloads in many federal district courts along the border. From 2007 to 2008, federal prosecutions of immigration crimes nearly doubled, reaching more than 70,000 cases.

To understand how Operation Streamline is working, the Warren Institute conducted interviews with judges, U.S. attorneys, defense attorneys, Border Patrol representatives and immigration lawyers in four cities where versions of the program are in place in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. The Warren Institute’s report concludes that Operation Streamline raises significant legal and policy concerns. The program likely diverts crucial law enforcement resources away from fighting violent crime along the border, fails to demonstrate that it effectively reduces undocumented immigration, and violates the U.S. Constitution. This project also examines the Southern District of California as an alternative to Operation Streamline.

Aarti Kohli is Director of Immigration Policy at the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Race, Ethnicity and Diversity at Berkeley School of Law. Her area of expertise is immigration law and policy. She leads the institute’s immigration initiative with the goal of connecting research with civic action and policy debate. Her work has focused on the following topics, among others: racial profiling in immigration enforcement, the intersection of criminal and immigration law; impact of deportations on U.S. citizen children, legal restrictions on immigrant access to healthcare; economic, social, and legal implications of state and local laws on immigrant integration.

She has served as a Consultant to the Office of Children’s Issues for the U.S. Department of State. Formerly, she was Judiciary Committee and Immigration and Claims Subcommittee counsel to Representative Howard Berman (D-CA). Prior to working for Congress, she served as Assistant Legislative Director at UNITE union in Washington DC. In addition, she has also worked as a consultant to the National Immigration Law Center, the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children, and the National Immigration Forum. Aarti holds a J.D. from University of California Hastings College of the Law and a B.A. from UC Berkeley in Development Studies. She is a member of the California Bar.

Nation of Emigrants Reviewed in Migraciones Internacionales

CCIS Associate Director David FitzGerald’s book was reviewed recently in A Nation of Emigrants: How Mexico Manages its MigrationMigraciones Internacionales. Cecilia Imaz Bayona of Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México describes the book as “highly recommended and illustrative, as much for its historical material as for its arguments about new forms of citizenship produced by international migration.”

Read full review »

Center of Expertise on Migration and Health — First Annual Research Training Workshop

Download PDF of conference agenda »

May 13-14, 2010, Weaver Conference Center, UC San Diego

The UC Center of Expertise on Migration and Health (COEMH), Is a component of the UC-wide Global Health Institute). The COEMH is a ten-campus, interdisciplinary program whose mission is to improve health and eliminate health disparities of international migrants, refugees, and internally displaced people around the world (see http://www.ucghi.universityofcalifornia.edu/coes/migration-and-health/index.aspx for further information).

The COEMH’s first annual, interdisciplinary Research Training Workshop will serve as a showcase for research being undertaken by graduate students and recent postdoctoral scholars throughout the UC system relating to migration and health. UC faculty members will serve as discussants, providing expert feedback on the students’ work and commenting on its relevance to their own research. Additional mentoring will be provided through one-on-one meetings between participating students and faculty members.

A selection of papers presented at the workshop will be published electronically as COEMH Working Papers and edited for publication as a special issue of a peer- ‐reviewed journal. A prize for the best paper will also be awarded.

Workshop Organizing Committee: Wayne Cornelius (UCSD), Coordinator; Frank Bean (UCI), Claire Brindis (UCSF), Robin DeLugan (UC Merced)

Agenda and Participants

Thursday, May 13

8:30 am
Welcome and Introductions

8:35 am
Session 1: Child Health and Family Dynamics

Luz Becerra (UCD)

Naomi Schapiro (UCSF)

Rosa Maria Sternberg (UCSF)

Kristin Yarris (UCLA)

Faculty Discussant: Sylvia Guendelman (UCB)

10:15 am
Coffee break

10:30 am
Session 2: Immigrant Incorporation and Generational Well-being

Rennie Lee (UCLA)

Carolyn Zambrano (UCIGeorgiana Bostean (UCI)

Ayman Tailakh (UCLA)

Faculty Discussant: Frank Bean (UCI)

12:15 pm
Lunch and Keynote Address

Jay Silverman (Harvard School of Public Health), “Sex Trafficking: A Dark and Neglected Corner of Gender-based Violence and HIV Risk”

1:45 pm
Session 3: Occupational and Environmental Health

Chelsea Eastman (UCD)

Shira Goldenberg (UCSD)

Angela Robertson (UCSD)

Barbara Baquero (UCSD)

Faculty Discussant: Marc Schenker (UCD)

5:30 pm
Dinner and Keynote Address

Sylvia Guendelman (UCB),

“Birth Outcomes of Mexican immigrant Mothers: Advantages in the Midst of inequalities?”

Friday, May 14

8:45 am
Session 4: Women’s and Reproductive Health

Gloria Giraldo (UCLA)

Alexandra Minnis (UCB)

Maryada Vallet (UCLA)

Liliana Quezada & Katie Kessler (UCSD)

Faculty Discussant: Claire Brindis (UCSF)

10:30 am
Coffee break

10:45 am
Session 5: Health Care and Immigration Policy

Cassie Herzog (UCD)

Helen Marrow (UCB)

Rebecca Hester (UCSC/UI)

Jennifer Miller-Thayer (UCR)

Faculty Discussants: Wayne Cornelius (UCSD), Steffanie Strathdee (UCSD)

12:15 pm
Lunch and adjournment

1:00-3:00 pm
Meeting of COEMH Steering Committee


Download PDF of conference agenda »

Kitty Calavita — Immigration, Race, and Law in Italy: The Political Economy of Backlash

Begins at 2:00 in the Eleanor Roosevelt Administration Building Conference Room

Italy has one of the fastest-growing immigrant populations in Europe. In this presentation, Calavita explores immigration law, the role of immigrant labor in the economy, and the racialization of immigrants in Italy. She notes that Italy has one of the lowest birthrates in the world and one of the oldest populations, and that immigrants help offset population declines and provide a critical labor force in many sectors and jobs at wages eschewed by Italians. She analyzes the current political backlash and racialization of immigrants within the context of a fundamental contradiction between the economic utility of immigrants as a third-world workforce and political rhetoric calling for their “integration.”

Kitty Calavita is Chancellor’s Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She has conducted research and published widely in the field of immigration and immigration lawmaking. Her work is both contemporary and historical, U.S.-based and comparative. An early book, Inside the State: The Bracero Program, Immigration, and the INS, used unpublished archival material to document the internal dynamics of the INS in shaping the Bracero Program, and connected structural contradictions in the political economy to the details of agency decisionmaking. Her recent book, Immigrants at the Margins: Law, Race, and Exclusion in Southern Europe (Cambridge, 2005), examines immigrant marginalization in Italy and Spain, and the formal and informal legal processes that contribute to it.

Her most recent book is Invitation to Law & Society: An Introduction to the Study of Real Law (University of Chicago Press, 2010). Interweaving scholarship with personal anecdotes and humor, it is an engaging and accessible guide to the prominent issues and distinctive approaches in the field of law & society. Neither introductory text nor scholarly monograph, the book is meant for students and colleagues alike.

She has launched a new research agenda, together with her colleague Valerie Jenness,  that explores some of these issues of race, marginalization, and legal processes within the venue of prisons. She is interested specifically in the implementation of the informal grievance process in California prisons, and what the use of this process can tell us about prisoners’ legal consciousness, as well as about rights consciousness and prison life more generally. The study includes archival data from  prisoners’ written grievances, as well as interviews with current prisoners and corrections officials.

David FitzGerald on 60 Minutes

CCIS Associate Director David FitzGerald is featured in several CBS 60 Minutes “web extra” interviews. The segments were shot for a report on the All-American Canal.


Professor David FitzGerald, Associate Director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at UC San Diego briefs “60 Minutes” Correspondent Scott Pelley on illegal
immigration from Mexico.

Illegal Immigration: The Hard Facts

Militarizing the Border

Border Control

Taking a stand: Residents raise their voice in favor of immigration reform (Brownsville Herald)

” … But if you successfully frame any policy as part of national security, there will be a greater chance of passing it, said John Skrentny, a sociology professor and director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California at San Diego.

Such was the case in the late 1950s with the passing of the National Defense Education Act, Skrentny said. For years, people believed the school funding was a local issue and that the federal government should not get involved, even though campuses were struggling, the professor said. That changed when the Soviet Union launched its first satellite ahead of the United States spurring the country to finally pass the act. … ”

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Arrested on Entry: Operation Streamline and the Prosecution of Immigration Crimes (Migration Policy Institute)

” … Political scientist Wayne Cornelius has found that notwithstanding increased border enforcement measures, eventual crossing success rates have remained consistently high (in the 97 percent range from 2005 to 2007), even for unauthorized immigrants who are apprehended by the Border Patrol. However, border enforcement strategies have increased smuggler fees and have pushed migrants to more remote and dangerous crossing routes. … ”

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