CCIS Research Associate Marisa Abrajano is publishing a new article on Black and Latino voting and same-sex marriage.

Marisa Abrajano is in the process of publishing “Are Blacks and Latinos Responsible for the Passage of Proposition 8? Analyzing Voter Attitudes on California’s Proposal to Ban Same-Sex Marriage in 2008.”

Abrajano, Marisa. September, 2010. “Are Blacks and Latinos Responsible for the Passage of Proposition 8? Analyzing Voter Attitudes on California’s Proposal to Ban Same-Sex Marriage in 2008”. Political Research Quarterly.

CCIS Research Associate Marisa Abrajano publishes two books on Latino politics


Marisa Abrajano has published Campaigning to the New American Electorate: Television Advertising to Latinos and New Faces and New Voices: The Hispanic Electorate in America.

    Abrajano, Marisa. 2010. Campaigning to the New American Electorate: Television Advertising to Latinos. Stanford: Stanford University Press.


    Abrajano, Marisa and Michael Alvarez. 2010. New Faces, New Voices: The Hispanic Electorate in America. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

CCIS Research Associate April Linton co-publishes new article on restrictive language policies.

April Linton has published “Bilingualism for the Children: Dual-Language Programs under Restrictive Language Policies in Forbidden”.

Linton, April and Rebecca C. Franklin. 2010. “Bilingualism for the Children: Dual-Language Programs under Restrictive Language Policies.” Chap. 11 in Forbidden Language: English Learners and Restrictive Language Policies edited by Patricia Gándara and Megan Hopkins. New York: Teachers College Press.

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CCIS Research Associate Claire Adida publishes new articles on Muslim integration; immigrant exclusion in Africa; Mexican migrant remittances

CCIS Research Associate Claire Adida publishes new articles on Muslim integration; immigrant exclusion in Africa; Mexican migrant remittances

Identifying barriers to Muslim integration in France, with David D. Laitin and Marie-Anne Valfort. 2010. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 107(52).

Randall Hansen – States, Migration, and International Cooperation: Can there be a global migration regime?

 

States, Migration, and International Cooperation: Can there be a global migration regime?

Seminar to be held in ERC 115 at 2:00 pm.

Within the migration literature and policy circles, there is a enthusiasm for the international governance of migration. At their most ambitious, scholars hope to see the emergence of a global migration governance regime that would do for voluntary migration what the UNHCR has done for forced migration. Drawing on a three-year research project, Hanson’s paper critically examines global migration governance and explores the extent to which there can be any international cooperation of migration.

The paper begins with the assumption that cooperation in the area of migration is not natural; indeed, it is exceptionally difficult. States are rational, not altruistic (that is, they are motivated by that which benefits them and their electorates), and they are jealous guardians of power. It then makes three arguments. First, migration is not, as some argue, a public good (a good whose benefits are non-excludable), and therefore not an area in which there is a natural incentive to cooperate. Second, where cooperation occurs it is likely to be bilateral if it is formal, regional if it is informal, and rarely if ever global. The greatest scope for international cooperation is, therefore, to be found in informal, regional cooperation over migration Third, in terms of institutionalization, more is less: international cooperation will achieve more in substantive policy terms when it is informal, non-binding, and relatively closed to public scrutiny.

Randall Hansen is a Full Professor and Canada Research Chair in Immigration & Governance in the department of political science at the University of Toronto. His work covers immigration and citizenship and political history. He is author of  Citizenship and Immigration in Post-War Britain (OUP, 2000), Towards a European Nationality (w. P. Weil, Palgrave, 2001), Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. and Europe (w. P. Weil, Berghahn, 2002), Immigration and asylum from 1900 to the present [w. M. Gibney, ABC-CLIO, 2005]. His website is www.randallhansen.ca

REMESO seeks Postdoctor in Migration and Ethnic Studies with a focus on IT, globalisation and labour market changes

REMESO – the Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society at Linköping University in Sweden

The postdoctoral position holder is expected to conduct high level research to the extent of at least 80 per cent of full time duties, within REMESO’s research programme, with a focus on migration-related developments within the ICT sector. This entails research on globalisation, migration policy and international migration trends, and the connections between labour market flexibilisation and ethnified- and gendered segmentation processes. Empirically, the research shall be oriented towards trans-national and/or comparative studies of labour migration, working life and the development of the ICT sector.

20 per cent of the position holder’s duties consist of teaching within the research area of the assignment and participation in the institute’s overall programme of work commensurate with its status as a leading research environment at Linköping University.

The person we seek shall have completed a doctoral degree (PhD) within a social science discipline relevant to the research topic. The appointee shall be able to show documented skill and thorough experience of research on globalisation and working life changes, including publications in peer reviewed international journals. Of special weight is proven experience in conducting comparative research on organizational development and transformation of working life in the ICT sector or other high technology sector with perspectives on migration and migration policy, ethnicity and gender.

The position commences August 1, 2011, or according to agreement. A post doctor can be appointed up to two years maximum, with prolongation if special circumstances arise.

For Full Details and Contact Information, please click here.

UC International Migration Conference 2011

February 26 – Second Annual UC Migration Conference hosted by the Gifford Center

The Gifford Center and UCSD’s Center for Comparative Immigration Studies (CCIS) will host the Second Annual University of California Migration Conference on February 26, 2011 at UC Davis. This multi-disciplinary conference will provide an opportunity for University of California faculty and advanced graduate students to share their current migration-related research. Click here for information about last year’s conference, held at UCSD. If you are a UC faculty member or advanced graduate student and are interested in attending, please contact Prof. David J. Kyle at djkyle@ucdavis.edu

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CCIS Hosts US Army War College


On February 8, CCIS hosted the US Army War College for a morning briefing. High-ranking officers from more than 20 countries, including Canada, India, South Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland and Senegal, attended the session. The panelists were David Mares, who spoke on “Post-Drug War Visions: What Comes after 40 Years?,” David FitzGerald on “The Effects of Migration Control Measures on Unauthorized Migration to the United States,” Amada Armenta on ” Policing Immigrants: Dilemmas of Interior Immigration Enforcement,” and John Skrentny on “The Politics of Immigration.”