Book Panel Discussion with Zoltan Hajnal, Paul Frymer and Michael Rivera

 

Discussion to be held on Friday, April 20th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

“Why Americans Don’t Join the Party” explores why so many Americans–in particular, Latinos and Asians–fail to develop ties to either major party, why African Americans feel locked into a particular party, and why some white Americans are shut out by ideologically polarized party competition. Through extensive analysis, the authors demonstrate that when the Democratic and Republican parties fail to raise political awareness, to engage deeply held political convictions, or to affirm primary group attachments, nonpartisanship becomes a rationally adaptive response. By developing a model of partisanship that explicitly considers America’s new racial diversity and evolving nonpartisanship, this book provides the Democratic and Republican parties and other political stakeholders with the means and motivation to more fully engage the diverse range of Americans who remain outside the partisan fray.

Zoltan Hajnal is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.  A scholar of racial and ethnic politics, urban politics, immigration, and political behavior, Dr. Hajnal is the author of Why Americans Don’t Join the Party: Race, Immigration, and the Failure of Political Parties to Engage the Electorate (Princeton 2011), America’s Uneven Democracy: Race, Turnout, and Representation in City Politics (Cambridge 2010) and Changing White Attitudes toward Black Political Leadership (Cambridge 2006) and has published in the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, and numerous other journals, edited volumes, and newspaper editorial pages. Before joining the faculty at UCSD, Dr. Hajnal was a research fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California and a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Brandeis University.  He has received numerous honors for his research and writing including the Best Book and Best Paper in Urban Politics Awards from the American Political Science Association.

Paul Frymer is Associate Professor of Politics at Princeton University.  He writes and teaches on topics in American politics, institutions, law, state theory, and American political development, particularly as they intersect with issues of democratic representation, race and civil rights, and labor and employment rights. In 2010, his book, Uneasy Alliances: Race and Party Competition was re-issued by Princeton University Press with an afterward on the significance of the Obama election. In 2008, Frymer published Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party, also with Princeton University Press.

Michael Rivera is a current graduate student in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.  Before moving to San Diego, he studied at the University of California, Davis where he received a B.A. in Political Science and Spanish. His current research interests include state immigration policy, American voter behavior and race/ethnic politics.

Race and Immigration Policy in the Americas

April 11, 6-8pm
The New School
Orientation Room, 2 W 13th St (at Fifth Ave)

A Panel Discussion with:
David FitzGerald, UC San Diego
Victoria Hattam, The New School
Adam McKeown, Columbia University

Understandings of immigration policy have all too often been limited by national blinders that fail to understand the full weight of interactions across borders. Domestic class conflict is a necessary but insufficient explanation for patterns of ethnic selection. Policies often converged in ways that inward-looking perspectives on ideologies of nation-building cannot fully explain. While racism had an important causal role to play in the development of immigration policies, the critical race perspective struggles to explain why racialized polities that were the norm throughout the Americas have been replaced by laws that are explicitly anti-racist and which in North America have yielded highly diverse immigration flows. The argument that liberal democracies are inherently incompatible with ethnic selection does not hold water when explaining the onset of these policies or their demise. This project disentangles the different mechanisms of policy diffusion in their interaction with domestic factors. Most surprisingly, in the light of the consensus that norms flow from the strong to the weak, this study shows how weak countries working in concert can create new international norms in ways that literally reshape nation- states. Decolonization and geopolitics were the critical drivers for ending policies of racial and other ethnic discrimination in immigration law.

International Center for Migration, Ethnicity, and Citizenship
6 East 16th Street, 9th floor
New York, NY 10003
Telephone: 212.229.5399
Email: icmec@newschool.edu

View poster »

Life as an Undocumented Immigrant

CCIS graduate student researchers David Keyes and Angela S. García comment on their report, “Life as an Undocumented Immigrant: How Restrictive Local Immigration Policies Affect Daily Life,” in U-T San Diego, La Opinión, NBC San Diego, and Univision San Diego.

Read full U-T San Diego article »

Read full La Opinión article »

Watch NBC San Diego interview »

Watch Univision San Diego interview »

The Politics of Race and Place Workshop

Keynote Speaker and Session 1: Local Context and Its Impact on Political behavior and Attitudes
 

Session 2: Policy Implications of Demographic Change
 

February 24, 2012

12:00-5:30pm

UCSD, The Weaver Center, Institute of Americas

12:00-12:10 Welcome and Introduction, Marisa Abrajano (UCSD) and R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

12:15-1:15 Lunch and Keynote Speaker, Michael J. Aguirre (Former San Diego City Attorney), “Putting Research Into Action”

Moderator: Steve Erie, UCSD

1:15-3:15 Session 1: Local Context and Its Impact on Political Behavior and Attitudes

1. Marisa Abrajano (UCSD) and R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

2. Zoltan Hajnal (UCSD), “Multi-Ethnic Context and Minority Policy Attitudes”

Discussant: Ron Schmidt (CSULB)

3. Janelle Wong (USC), “Immigration, Religion and Conservative Politics in Houston and L.A.”

Discussant: Mark Sawyer (UCLA)

4. Pei-te Lien (UCSB), ” Race, Place, Gender, and Minority Representation in Local Elective Offices”

Discussant: Leland Saito (USC)

3:15-3:30 Coffee Break

3:30-5:00 Session 2: Policy Implications of Demographic Change

5. Justin Levitt (Loyola Law School), Municipal Redistricting Outside the Box

Discussant: Thad Kousser (UCSD)

6. Lisa Garcia Bedolla (Cal), “Ethnorace and Place: Political Socialization among Immigrant Youth in Orange County”

Discussant: R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

7. Jane Junn (USC) and Vladimir Medenica (USC), “Attitudes on Immigration Policy in California: Party Identification and Local Context”

Discussant: Roderick Kiewiet (Cal Tech)

5:00-5:30   Closing Remarks

Research Seminar with Patrick Ettinger & Kelly Lytle Hernandez

 

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, February 21st in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

“`Something there is that doesn’t love a wall’:  Late Nineteenth-Century Border Crossings and the Imperatives of American Border Control”

Federal laws restricting the entry of certain migrants into the United States, initially imposed in the late nineteenth century, unsurprisingly occasioned the first efforts to evade those restrictions.  Among other responses, smugglers and immigrants from around the globe began to make use of routes into the United States that crossed the Canadian and Mexican borders.  American officials responded by attempting to institute border-crossing regulations and border guards.  This, of course, meant determining what exactly an effective border would look like.  This talk considers the visions of proper border enforcement that developed among American immigration officials, policy makers, and the media in the decades before the creation of the U.S. Border Patrol in 1924.

Dr. Patrick Ettinger grew up in southern California and studied in the Great Books Program at the University of Notre Dame, graduating with a B.A. in 1986.  He earned his PhD in History from Indiana University in 2000, where his dissertation research focused on undocumented immigration and early border enforcement efforts on the Canadian and Mexican borders at the turn of the 20th century.  He has given various professional papers and published excerpts from his research in the Western Historical Quarterly. His book, Imaginary Lines:  Border Enforcement and the Origins of Undocumented Immigration, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2009 and named a finalist for the William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America.  Currently, he is Professor of History at Sacramento State University, where he regularly teaches courses in American immigration history, the history of the American West, and oral history.  He also serves as the director of his department’s Public History Master’s Program.

“Migra! A History of the US Border Patrol”

Migra! chronicles the untold history of the United States Border Patrol from its beginnings in 1924 as a small peripheral outfit to its emergence as a large professional police force. It is based upon a gold mine of lost and unseen records stored in garages, closets, an abandoned factory, and in U.S. and Mexican archives. Focusing on the daily challenges of policing the borderlands and bringing to light unexpected partners and forgotten dynamics, Migra! reveals how the U.S. Border Patrol translated the mandate for

Kelly Lytle Hernandez is associate professor in the UCLA Department of History and Associate Co-Director of the National Center for History in the Schools. Her research interests are in twentieth-century U.S. history with a concentration upon race, migration, and police and prison systems in the American West and U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Her new book, MIGRA! A History of the U.S. Border Patrol (University of California Press, 2010) is the first book to tell the story of how and why the U.S. Border Patrol concentrates its resources upon policing unsanctioned Mexican immigration despite the many possible targets and strategies of U.S. migration control. Her current research focuses upon exploring the social world of incarceration in Los Angeles between 1876 and 1965.

* Light refreshments will be provided