Life as an Undocumented Immigrant

CCIS graduate student researchers David Keyes and Angela S. García comment on their report, “Life as an Undocumented Immigrant: How Restrictive Local Immigration Policies Affect Daily Life,” in U-T San Diego, La Opinión, NBC San Diego, and Univision San Diego.

Read full U-T San Diego article »

Read full La Opinión article »

Watch NBC San Diego interview »

Watch Univision San Diego interview »

The Politics of Race and Place Workshop

Keynote Speaker and Session 1: Local Context and Its Impact on Political behavior and Attitudes
 

Session 2: Policy Implications of Demographic Change
 

February 24, 2012

12:00-5:30pm

UCSD, The Weaver Center, Institute of Americas

12:00-12:10 Welcome and Introduction, Marisa Abrajano (UCSD) and R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

12:15-1:15 Lunch and Keynote Speaker, Michael J. Aguirre (Former San Diego City Attorney), “Putting Research Into Action”

Moderator: Steve Erie, UCSD

1:15-3:15 Session 1: Local Context and Its Impact on Political Behavior and Attitudes

1. Marisa Abrajano (UCSD) and R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

2. Zoltan Hajnal (UCSD), “Multi-Ethnic Context and Minority Policy Attitudes”

Discussant: Ron Schmidt (CSULB)

3. Janelle Wong (USC), “Immigration, Religion and Conservative Politics in Houston and L.A.”

Discussant: Mark Sawyer (UCLA)

4. Pei-te Lien (UCSB), ” Race, Place, Gender, and Minority Representation in Local Elective Offices”

Discussant: Leland Saito (USC)

3:15-3:30 Coffee Break

3:30-5:00 Session 2: Policy Implications of Demographic Change

5. Justin Levitt (Loyola Law School), Municipal Redistricting Outside the Box

Discussant: Thad Kousser (UCSD)

6. Lisa Garcia Bedolla (Cal), “Ethnorace and Place: Political Socialization among Immigrant Youth in Orange County”

Discussant: R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

7. Jane Junn (USC) and Vladimir Medenica (USC), “Attitudes on Immigration Policy in California: Party Identification and Local Context”

Discussant: Roderick Kiewiet (Cal Tech)

5:00-5:30   Closing Remarks

Research Seminar with Patrick Ettinger & Kelly Lytle Hernandez

 

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, February 21st in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

“`Something there is that doesn’t love a wall’:  Late Nineteenth-Century Border Crossings and the Imperatives of American Border Control”

Federal laws restricting the entry of certain migrants into the United States, initially imposed in the late nineteenth century, unsurprisingly occasioned the first efforts to evade those restrictions.  Among other responses, smugglers and immigrants from around the globe began to make use of routes into the United States that crossed the Canadian and Mexican borders.  American officials responded by attempting to institute border-crossing regulations and border guards.  This, of course, meant determining what exactly an effective border would look like.  This talk considers the visions of proper border enforcement that developed among American immigration officials, policy makers, and the media in the decades before the creation of the U.S. Border Patrol in 1924.

Dr. Patrick Ettinger grew up in southern California and studied in the Great Books Program at the University of Notre Dame, graduating with a B.A. in 1986.  He earned his PhD in History from Indiana University in 2000, where his dissertation research focused on undocumented immigration and early border enforcement efforts on the Canadian and Mexican borders at the turn of the 20th century.  He has given various professional papers and published excerpts from his research in the Western Historical Quarterly. His book, Imaginary Lines:  Border Enforcement and the Origins of Undocumented Immigration, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2009 and named a finalist for the William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America.  Currently, he is Professor of History at Sacramento State University, where he regularly teaches courses in American immigration history, the history of the American West, and oral history.  He also serves as the director of his department’s Public History Master’s Program.

“Migra! A History of the US Border Patrol”

Migra! chronicles the untold history of the United States Border Patrol from its beginnings in 1924 as a small peripheral outfit to its emergence as a large professional police force. It is based upon a gold mine of lost and unseen records stored in garages, closets, an abandoned factory, and in U.S. and Mexican archives. Focusing on the daily challenges of policing the borderlands and bringing to light unexpected partners and forgotten dynamics, Migra! reveals how the U.S. Border Patrol translated the mandate for

Kelly Lytle Hernandez is associate professor in the UCLA Department of History and Associate Co-Director of the National Center for History in the Schools. Her research interests are in twentieth-century U.S. history with a concentration upon race, migration, and police and prison systems in the American West and U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Her new book, MIGRA! A History of the U.S. Border Patrol (University of California Press, 2010) is the first book to tell the story of how and why the U.S. Border Patrol concentrates its resources upon policing unsanctioned Mexican immigration despite the many possible targets and strategies of U.S. migration control. Her current research focuses upon exploring the social world of incarceration in Los Angeles between 1876 and 1965.

* Light refreshments will be provided

UC International Migration Conference 2012

Panel 1. Local Policy Responses
 

Panel 2. Unauthorized Migration
 

Lunch Speaker
 

Panel 3. Latino Politics
 

Panel 4. Refugees and Security
 

CCIS will host the Third Annual University of California Conference on International Migration: Politics and Governance on Friday, February 10, 2012.

The conference will take place in the Weaver Center of the Institute of the Americas – University of California, San Diego.  For directions, click here.

If you are interested in attending the conference, contact Ana Minvielle.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy, UC Irvine; UCLA Program on International Migration; and Gifford Center for Population Studies, UC Davis


SCHEDULE (Rooms subject to Change):

8:00-8:30am COFFEE AND WELCOME

David FitzGerald, UC San Diego

John Skrentny, UC San Diego

8:30-10:00am PANEL 1. Local Policy Responses

Karthick Ramakrishnan, UCR, “Polarized Change:  An Evidence-Based Theory of Subnational Immigration Regulation”

Jennifer Chacon, UCI, “Overcriminalizing Immigration”

Angela Garcia, UCSD, “Return to Sender? A Comparative Analysis of Immigrant Communities in ‘Attrition through Enforcement’ Destinations”

Discussant: Zoli Hajnal, UCSD

10:00- 10:30am BREAK

10:30am-12:30pm PANEL 2. Unauthorized Migration

Wayne Cornelius, UCSD, “Evaluating the Costs and Efficacy of U.S. Immigration Enforcement: A National Academy of Sciences Study”

Frank Bean, UCI, “Unauthorized Mexican Migration:  Effects on Second-Generation Educational Attainment”

Ruben Hernandez-Leon, UCLA, “The (Undocumented) Migration Industry as a Bastard Institution”

Discussant: Esther Castillo, UCI

12:30-1:30pm LUNCH

Speaker: Roberto Suro, USC, “After the Storm:  The immigration policy debate in the wake of the great recession”

1:30-3:00pm PANEL 3. Latino Politics

Cristina Mora, UCB, “Hispanic Panethnicity”

Rodney Hero, UCB, “Exploring the Strength of ‘American’ Identity among Latinos: Considering the Role of ‘Liberal’ Values, Ascriptive Factors, and Demographic Characteristics”

David Sears, UCLA, “Do national and ethnic identities collide?”

Susan Bibler Coutin, UCI, “Memory, Membership, and Rights:  Activism among Salvadoran Youth”

Discussant: Susan Brown, UCI

3:00-3:30pm BREAK

3:30-5:00pm PANEL 4. Refugees and Security

Phil Wolgin, Center for American Progress (formerly UCB), “Encouraging Defection while Discouraging Admissions: U.S. Policy toward Refugees in Asia’s Berlin, 1950-1965″

Kate Jastram, UCB, “Seeking Asylum, Suspected of War Crimes: Weighing Persecution by the Persecuted”

Robbie Totten, UCLA/CCIS, “Security Objectives and U.S. Refugee Policy”

Discussant: David Pedersen, UCSD

6:00pm DINNER & KEYNOTE ADDRESS (invited panelists and discussants only)

Edward Alden, Council on Foreign Relations, “Are U.S. Borders Finally Secure? Evidence and Implications for the Immigration Debate”

Jane Junn – How to Study Public Opinion in a Diverse Polity: Political Attitudes on Immigration in the U.S.

 

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, February 7th in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

The study of the contours and antecedents of U.S. public opinion on immigration has been characterized by several strategies: 1) analyzing differences between whites and African Americans only; 2) controlling for race when estimating inferential models by using dummy variables; 3) utilizing models of white opinion to explain attitudes among minority Americans; and 4) analyzing one racial or ethnic group in isolation. Professor Junn argues that these approaches are insufficient to both the descriptive and inferential task facing analysts of public opinion in a diverse American polity. Instead, she advocates a comparative relational approach that considers the opinions of all Americans, and generates hypotheses based on the interactive and historically-grounded experiences of racial groups in the United States. With this approach, she develops a theory of the political context of racial structural positionality and articulate how this context and the development of racialization structures agency  and constraint for Americans classified by race.

Jane Junn is Professor of Political Science at the University of Southern California. She is the author of four books on political participation in the U.S. Her first book, Education and Democratic Citizenship in America (with Norman Nie and Ken Stehlik-Barry, University of Chicago Press, 1996), won the Woodrow Wilson Foundation award from the American Political Science Association for the best book published in political science. She is also the author of Civic Education: What Makes Students Learn (with Richard G. Niemi, Yale University Press, 1998), New Race Politics: Understanding Minority and Immigrant Politics (edited with Kerry L. Haynie, Cambridge University Press, 2008), and Asian American Political Participation: Emerging Constituents and their Political Identities (with Janelle Wong, Karthick Ramakrishnan and Taeku Lee, Russell Sage Foundation, 2011). This most recent book is based on data from the 2008 National Asian American Survey. She is currently at work with Natalie Masuoka on a book on political attitudes in the U.S. entitled Conditional Welcome: Public Opinion on Immigration and the Politics of Belonging.

Jane has been Vice President of the American Political Science Association, a Fulbright Senior Scholar and a recipient of an Outstanding Teacher Award from Columbia University Teachers College. She was a member of the Social Science Research Council National Research Commission on Elections and Voting and a member of the National Academy of Science Committee on the U.S. Naturalization Test Redesign. She was the director of the USC – Los Angeles Times Poll during the 2010 California election.

* Light refreshments will be provided