Daniel J. Hopkins – The Hidden American Immigration Consensus: A Conjoint Analysis of Attitudes Toward Immigrants

Department of Political Science American Politics and Institution Project presents:

Daniel J. Hopkins
Assistant Professor
Department of Government
Georgetown University

“The Hidden American Immigration Consensus: A Conjoint Analysis of Attitudes Toward Immigrants”

Wednesday, May 23, 2012
12:00pm in SSB 102

Lunch will be provided

LASA2012 / Toward a Third Century of Independence in Latin America

CCIS Senior Fellow, Kathy Kopinak, organizes a panel at the LASA 2012 conference in San Francisco (May 23-26) titled “The Impact of Export Processing Employment and Gender on Migration from Mexico to the U.S. and from Morocco to Spain”. Other panel participants are  Rosa Maria Soriano (former CCIS fellow, University of Granada), Antonio Trinidad (University of Granada), Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo (University of Southern California), Jenna Hennebry (Wilfred Laurier) and Marlene Solis (COLEF).

For more information, click here.

Robbie Totten presented at a Princeton Center for Migration and Development conference

The Princeton Center for Migration and Development hosted a conference entitled, “Fast and Furious: New Developments in Immigration and Immigration Reform,” on May 18-19, 2012.   CCIS Pre-Doctoral Fellow Robbie Totten gave a talk titled, “Security and State and Federal Immigration Policy.”

For more information, click here.

Robbie Totten – Security and United States Immigration Policy

 

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, May 8th in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

What is the relationship between security and immigration to the U.S? How have security objectives factored into U.S. immigration policy? These questions are significant for the U.S. because the volume of international migration has been increasing in recent decades and many analysts argue that without sound policy planning immigration can for America serve as a source of conflict with foreign states, tax the ability of its domestic systems to assimilate diverse peoples without violence, and expose its citizens and immigrants to crime, contagious disease, and terrorism. This talk will address these questions and present the strategic logic for U.S. immigration policy by identifying three general categories of security objectives that American officials have attempted to reach with immigration from the colonial era to the present-day: (1) foreign relations, (2) material and military interests, and (3) domestic security (prevent crime, espionage, and terrorism; epidemics; and ethnic violence). The discussions of the categories will draw from International Relations (IR) and Security Studies theories, primary sources, and works by demographers and historians to specify the relationships amongst the security areas and immigration, identify policy instruments used by leaders to influence immigration for security, and present historical cases of U.S. immigration policies designed for security purposes. The talk will conclude with discussing its implications for immigration research and contemporary policy.

Robbie Totten is a doctoral candidate in the UCLA Department of Political Science and the pre-doctoral fellow here at the CCIS. He received his BA in Political Science from Duke University and he has published articles in the Journal of Interdisciplinary History and Diplomatic History. Totten’s dissertation is titled, “Security and United States Immigration Policy,” and his research interests include, demography and security, foreign relations and state migration policies, nontraditional security threats, geopolitics and international migration, refugee crises, and U.S. immigration policy history.


The 28th Meeting of the Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC)

The 28th Meeting of the Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC)

Friday, May 4th, 12:00 – 7:30pm

The Village at Torrey Pines, 15th Floor

Co-sponsored by: The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, Department of Political Science

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MEETING AGENDA

12:00-12:15pm LUNCH AND INTRODUCTION

12:15-2:45pm PANEL 1

Allison Anoll, Stanford University, Dissipating Cuban Distinctiveness: A Study of the Increasing Homogeneity of Latino Political Participation Among Post-1980 Immigrant and U.S. Born Cubans

Zoltan Hajnal and Michael Rivera, UCSD, Attitudes Toward Latinos and the White Vote

Chris Haynes, University of California Riverside, Calling All Empathizers: How Empathy Moderates the Effect of Empathic Capacity on Immigration Policy Preferences

Brad Jones, UC Davis, Anchor Babies and Aliens: What’s in a Name?

Neil Visalvanich, UCSD, An Experimental Manipulation: Candidate Race, Information, and Vote Choice

2:45-3:00pm COFFEE BREAK

3:00-5:15pm PANEL 2

Melissa Michelson, Cal State University – East Bay, Nativity and Mobilization: Field Experiments in Immigrant Voter Mobilization

Sergio Garcia-Rios, University of Washington, From Defined to Refined: A Theory of Identity Formation among Latinos/as

Joel Fetzer and Michael Weisshar, Pepperdine University, Generic Prejudice and Public Attitudes toward Immigration in Argentina

Kristina Victor, UC Davis, The Ties that Bind: Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Ethnic Cues

Jane Lilly, UCSD Sociology, Identity and Protest: How the 2006 Immigration Protests Shaped Identity Among Latinos Living in the United States

Soomi Lee, University of La Verne, Racial Hetereogeneity and Medicaid Expenditure in the U.S. States: A Longitudinal Analysis

5:30-7:30pm RECEPTION

These events are open to all members of the UCSD community, as well as faculty and students from other universities and the general public. For further information, please contact Ana Minvielle at aminvielle@ucsd.edu or 858-822-4447.