Angela S. García publishes a paper in Ethnic and Racial Studies

CCIS graduate student researcher Angela S. García has published a paper in Ethnic and Racial Studies.  The article, titled “Return to Sender? A Comparative Analysis of Immigrant Communities in ‘Attrition through Enforcement’ Destinations,” uses data from the Mexican Migration Field Research Program to show how state and local-level immigration policies affect Mexican immigrants living in California and Oklahoma.

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Is Immigration Necessary? Work, Growth, and the Future in Japan and the United States

Director John Skrentny and several people from CCIS team are guest editors for this special issue of American Behavioral Scientist: Is Immigration Necessary? Work, Growth, and the Future in Japan and the United States.

For more information, click here »

Introduction

John D. Skrentny, Micah Gell-Redman,and Jack Jin Gary Lee
Japan, the United States, and the Philosophical Bases of Immigration Policy

Articles

Frank D. Bean, Susan K. Brown, James D. Bachmeier, Zoya Gubernskaya, and Christopher D. Smith
Luxury, Necessity, and Anachronistic Workers: Does the United States Need Unskilled Immigrant Labor?

Yasushi Iguchi
What Role Do Low-Skilled Migrants Play in the Japanese Labor Markets?

Philip Martin
High-Skilled Migrants: S&E Workers in the United States

Nana Oishi
The Limits of Immigration Policies: The Challenges of Highly Skilled Migration in Japan

Marc R. Rosenblum
Alternatives to Migration in the United States: Policy Issues and Economic Impact

Toshimitsu Shinkawa
Substitutes for Immigrants?: Social Policy Responses to Population Decreases in Japan

Manolo Abella
The United States’ and Japan’s Immigration Dilemmas in Comparative Perspective

Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal – Migration-Trust Networks: Social Cohesion in Mexican U.S.-Bound Emigration

 

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, June 5th in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm

In this research, Professor Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal uses ethnographic longitudinal data collected in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico as well as the U.S. to introduce the concept of Migration-Trust Networks (MTN) from a transnational perspective. The concept contributes to the existing social capital theories of international migration by defining the particularities that characterize the social networks of migration in which a large number of migrants from Mexico to the U.S. lack legal documentation. She specifies membership requirements to participate in a MTN for those who migrate from rural and urban places of origin. Religion, paisanaje, bounded solidarity, and enforceable trust are among the social mechanisms that influence the behavior of network participants to act collectively, trust one another, and offer mutual support in the challenges of migration. Assisting fellow migrants is expected of MTN members, while reciprocating the assistance is not. Instead, a form of risk pooling occurs in which migrants “return” favors by helping future migrants. The social structure of a MTN and the dependency on relationships of trust among its members allow for collective efficacy to form and serve as a safe haven for those who lack legal documents. Social expectations and social monitoring are maintained in the transnational context using modern technology such as cell phones and the internet. Flores-Yeffal provides a theoretical and empirical proposition of how and why the Migration-Trust Networks are able to expand by absorbing new members in a process she calls “the MTN effect.” She also argues that micro and macro social forces function simultaneously in the transnational context in order to develop, expand and/or transplant Migration-Trust Networks.

Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. She received her B.A. in Social Science from University of California Irvine, her M.A. in Demography and Ph.D. in Sociology from University of Pennsylvania. Her primary research interests include social capital, segregation, and transnational ties among Latin-American immigrants in the U.S., the role of modern technology in spreading anti-immigrant sentiment in the U.S., as well as the upward mobility of Latinos in the United States. Her research has been supported through her affiliation with the Mexican Migration Project and the Latin-American Migration Project at Princeton University, by the Mellon Foundation, “Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología” (CONACYT), and by the Mexican American and U.S. Latino Research Center at Texas A&M University. Her first book, entitled Migration-Trust Networks: social cohesion in Mexican-U.S. bound emigration, is being published by Texas A&M University Press. She is also currently writing her second book on international migration from El Salvador.

 

Michael Hiscox – The IMPALA Database Project

 

Seminar to be held on Thursday, May 31st in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

Governments adopt a variety of approaches to regulating immigration, and make adjustments to these policies frequently. But currently there exist no comprehensive, cross-nationally comparable data on immigration laws and policies and how they have changed over time. This is a major problem for ongoing research on the determinants and impacts of immigration policies. The project is aimed at addressing this problem by compiling and analyzing comparable data on immigration laws and policies in 26 major recipient countries from 1960 until the present, with annual updates to follow.  The project is examining major categories of immigration law and policy, covering the acquisition of citizenship, economic migration, family reunification, asylum and refugee protection, students, and policies relating to undocumented migration and border control. It will also collect data on policies relating to the integration of immigrants into the host country, including government programs providing assistance and language training. Regulations are coded for each country annually to generate comparable measures along key dimensions, including indexes of the restrictiveness of each country’s laws and policies relating to acquisition of citizenship, economic migration, treatment of asylum seekers and refugees, and border control, and measures of the extent to which regulations favor particular categories of immigrants based upon occupational skills, education, ethnicity, and gender.

Michael J. Hiscox is the Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs in the Department of Government in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. He is also a faculty associate at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the Harvard University Center for the Environment, and co-leader of the Harvard-MIT Private Governance Research Group. His research focuses on international trade, foreign investment, immigration, development, government accountability, and private sector initiatives and standards for addressing social and environmental issues in global supply chains.


Daniel J. Hopkins – The Hidden American Immigration Consensus: A Conjoint Analysis of Attitudes Toward Immigrants

Department of Political Science American Politics and Institution Project presents:

Daniel J. Hopkins
Assistant Professor
Department of Government
Georgetown University

“The Hidden American Immigration Consensus: A Conjoint Analysis of Attitudes Toward Immigrants”

Wednesday, May 23, 2012
12:00pm in SSB 102

Lunch will be provided

LASA2012 / Toward a Third Century of Independence in Latin America

CCIS Senior Fellow, Kathy Kopinak, organizes a panel at the LASA 2012 conference in San Francisco (May 23-26) titled “The Impact of Export Processing Employment and Gender on Migration from Mexico to the U.S. and from Morocco to Spain”. Other panel participants are  Rosa Maria Soriano (former CCIS fellow, University of Granada), Antonio Trinidad (University of Granada), Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo (University of Southern California), Jenna Hennebry (Wilfred Laurier) and Marlene Solis (COLEF).

For more information, click here.