The 28th Meeting of the Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC)

The 28th Meeting of the Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC)

Friday, May 4th, 12:00 – 7:30pm

The Village at Torrey Pines, 15th Floor

Co-sponsored by: The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, Department of Political Science

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MEETING AGENDA

12:00-12:15pm LUNCH AND INTRODUCTION

12:15-2:45pm PANEL 1

Allison Anoll, Stanford University, Dissipating Cuban Distinctiveness: A Study of the Increasing Homogeneity of Latino Political Participation Among Post-1980 Immigrant and U.S. Born Cubans

Zoltan Hajnal and Michael Rivera, UCSD, Attitudes Toward Latinos and the White Vote

Chris Haynes, University of California Riverside, Calling All Empathizers: How Empathy Moderates the Effect of Empathic Capacity on Immigration Policy Preferences

Brad Jones, UC Davis, Anchor Babies and Aliens: What’s in a Name?

Neil Visalvanich, UCSD, An Experimental Manipulation: Candidate Race, Information, and Vote Choice

2:45-3:00pm COFFEE BREAK

3:00-5:15pm PANEL 2

Melissa Michelson, Cal State University – East Bay, Nativity and Mobilization: Field Experiments in Immigrant Voter Mobilization

Sergio Garcia-Rios, University of Washington, From Defined to Refined: A Theory of Identity Formation among Latinos/as

Joel Fetzer and Michael Weisshar, Pepperdine University, Generic Prejudice and Public Attitudes toward Immigration in Argentina

Kristina Victor, UC Davis, The Ties that Bind: Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Ethnic Cues

Jane Lilly, UCSD Sociology, Identity and Protest: How the 2006 Immigration Protests Shaped Identity Among Latinos Living in the United States

Soomi Lee, University of La Verne, Racial Hetereogeneity and Medicaid Expenditure in the U.S. States: A Longitudinal Analysis

5:30-7:30pm RECEPTION

These events are open to all members of the UCSD community, as well as faculty and students from other universities and the general public. For further information, please contact Ana Minvielle at aminvielle@ucsd.edu or 858-822-4447.

Center for Forced Migration Studies (CFMS) 2012 Summer Institute

Northwestern University’s Center for Forced Migration Studies

2nd Annual Summer Institute - “Settling Resettlement”

July 8th-14th, 2012

The CFMS Summer Institute is a six-day, non-degree earning seminar intended for researchers, policy makers, academics and practitioners working in issues of forced migration, resettlement and humanitarian assistance both within the United States and abroad.

For more information, view website or flyer.

Book Panel Discussion with Zoltan Hajnal, Paul Frymer and Michael Rivera

 

Discussion to be held on Friday, April 20th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

“Why Americans Don’t Join the Party” explores why so many Americans–in particular, Latinos and Asians–fail to develop ties to either major party, why African Americans feel locked into a particular party, and why some white Americans are shut out by ideologically polarized party competition. Through extensive analysis, the authors demonstrate that when the Democratic and Republican parties fail to raise political awareness, to engage deeply held political convictions, or to affirm primary group attachments, nonpartisanship becomes a rationally adaptive response. By developing a model of partisanship that explicitly considers America’s new racial diversity and evolving nonpartisanship, this book provides the Democratic and Republican parties and other political stakeholders with the means and motivation to more fully engage the diverse range of Americans who remain outside the partisan fray.

Zoltan Hajnal is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.  A scholar of racial and ethnic politics, urban politics, immigration, and political behavior, Dr. Hajnal is the author of Why Americans Don’t Join the Party: Race, Immigration, and the Failure of Political Parties to Engage the Electorate (Princeton 2011), America’s Uneven Democracy: Race, Turnout, and Representation in City Politics (Cambridge 2010) and Changing White Attitudes toward Black Political Leadership (Cambridge 2006) and has published in the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, and numerous other journals, edited volumes, and newspaper editorial pages. Before joining the faculty at UCSD, Dr. Hajnal was a research fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California and a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Brandeis University.  He has received numerous honors for his research and writing including the Best Book and Best Paper in Urban Politics Awards from the American Political Science Association.

Paul Frymer is Associate Professor of Politics at Princeton University.  He writes and teaches on topics in American politics, institutions, law, state theory, and American political development, particularly as they intersect with issues of democratic representation, race and civil rights, and labor and employment rights. In 2010, his book, Uneasy Alliances: Race and Party Competition was re-issued by Princeton University Press with an afterward on the significance of the Obama election. In 2008, Frymer published Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party, also with Princeton University Press.

Michael Rivera is a current graduate student in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.  Before moving to San Diego, he studied at the University of California, Davis where he received a B.A. in Political Science and Spanish. His current research interests include state immigration policy, American voter behavior and race/ethnic politics.