Feb 20: Sixth Annual UC International Migration Conference

The Sixth Annual UC International Migration Conference
“Immigration Policy at Varying Scales”

to be held at the University of California Riverside School of Public Policy
Friday, February 20, 2015

CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR THE SIXTH ANNUAL
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION CONFERENCE

Despite the lack of Congressional legislation on immigration policy, there have been significant policy developments on immigrant integration and immigration enforcement at the national, state, and local levels. Immigration policy has also been an important area of activity in other countries, and in the work of international organizations.
How are we to make sense of all this?
The Sixth Annual UC conference on international migration is pleased to welcome scholarship on immigration policy, at any level of analysis, on any topic, and from any social science discipline. The focus on policy is especially timely, as UC Riverside launches its new School of Public Policy. In addition to paper presentations, we plan to have a keynote speaker on immigration policy in California (to be announced).
Those interested in presenting should email ucmigrationconference@gmail.com with a title and abstract of 150-200 words. We will provide free accommodations and travel subsidies (up to 100%) for all presenters at the conference.Please note the following criteria and deadlines, and please share widely.
ELIGIBILITY: Ph.D. candidates and faculty members in the University of California who are paper authors or coauthors
DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS: December 31, 2014
NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCES: January 9, 2015

 

New Study by UCSD’s Tom K. Wong: Significant Percentage of Unauthorized Immigrants May Be Eligible for Permanent Status

Tom K. Wong, UCSD Assistant Professor of Political Science and CCIS Research Associate, has published a study in the Journal on Migration and Human Security: “Paths to Lawful Immigration Status: Results and Implications from the PERSON Survey” (with Donald Kerwin, Jeanne M. Atkinson, and Mary Meg McCarthy).

Anecdotal evidence suggests that a significant percentage of unauthorized immigrants are potentially eligible for some sort of immigration relief, but they either do not know it or are not able to pursue lawful immigration status for other reasons. However, no published study the authors are aware of has systematically analyzed this question. The study attempts to answer the question of the number of unauthorized immigrants who, without knowing it, may already be potentially eligible for lawful immigration status.

Click here for the official press release from the Center for Migration Studies with link to the full article.

Dec 9: Challenges for Recent and Historic Refugees in the Middle East Documentary Night

Tuesday, December 9 at 5:30PM

Great Hall, International House, UCSD (Find Directions Here)

Free Public Event

International House Faculty Fellow for Fall 2014, Dr. Wael Al-Delaimy, will present 2 documentary films on refugees in the Middle East followed by a discussion moderated by Dr. Al-Delaimy, Professor of Epidemiology and Chief of the Division of Global Health at the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at UCSD.

The films are:

ZA’ATARI REFUGEE CAMP (2013) When it opened, Za’atari had just 100 families. Today, it has about 120,000 residents. Located 18 miles south of the Syrian border, it’s the fourth largest city in Jordan and the second largest refugee camp in the world.

SOMEONE LIKE ME (2011) Funded by the European Commission Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department (ECHO), the 24-minute film sheds light on the challenges and aspirations of young Palestine refugees growing up in Lebanon.

April 18 – UC Global Health Day

UC Global Health Day is a showcase for the research, training and outreach in global health being undertaken across the University of California. The goal of UC Global Health Day is to feature the rich diversity of global health work being done in different disciplines at all ten UC campuses. This event is an opportunity for UC students, fellows, faculty, staff and visiting scholars to share their current work in global health. It features plenary sessions, posters and concurrent breakout sessions covering a broad range of global health topics.

The UC Global Health Institute (UCGHI) invites submissions of abstracts for posters and proposals for breakout sessions for UC Global Health Day. Interdisciplinary and cross-campus collaborations are strongly encouraged. All presenters will receive complimentary registration to UC Global Health Day. Students selected to present at UC Global Health Day will receive funding to offset travel and poster expenses – all current UCSD students with accepted breakout session abstracts will be given a $100 travel scholarship to attend the event. Deadline for all submissions is Friday, January 9, 2015 (11:59pm PST).

Breakout sessions can take various different forms for structure (panel of presentations, video paired with Q&A, breakout discussion sessions with role-playing, etc). Check out the list of sessions from last year’s UCGHD for examples. The conference organizers are looking for innovative format submissions for breakout sessions. A variety of topics for these sessions are encouraged (eg. research, career opportunities/counseling, technology, etc). Cross-UC collaboration is strongly encouraged.

Subjects that might be of specific interest include (but are not limited to): migration and health, translational science, global health diplomacy, and women’s health & empowerment.

Nov 12 – Migrant Engagement in Mexican Hometown Politics w/ Lauren Duquette-Rury & Abigail Andrews

A Panel with:
Lauren Duquette-Rury, Assistant Professor of Sociology, UCLA
Abigail Andrews, Assistant Professor of Sociology, UCSD 

Wednesday, November 12, 12:00pm
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building 
Conference Room 115, First Floor

“Voice and Exit: Remittances and Local Participatory Governance in Mexico” with Lauren Duquette-Rury

Contemporary debates on the relationship between migration and development focus extensively on how migrant remittances affect the economies of sending countries. Yet, remittancesalso produce political consequences in migrants’ hometowns, but have received less attention in scholarly accounts. This presentation focuses on the ways in which exit from the polity and the acquisition of remittances abroad create political opportunities for migrant groups to exercise voice in the coproduction of public services in their hometowns.

First, the presentation presents a theory to explain the conditions under which coproduction affects the quality of local democracy. Second, using three comparative case studies based on fieldwork in Mexico, the presentation process-traces central causal mechanisms over time to reveal the impact of coproduction on participation and state-society relations. Research suggests that when transnational coproduction embeds local citizens, migrants and local government officials into the process, coproduction produces more participatory governance. However, given weak local-state capacity and migrants’ constricted social bases in their hometown communities, equitable participatory governance is often challenging to achieve through transnational coproduction.

“Remaking ‘Home’: The Cross-Border Politics of Rural Mexican Transformation” with Abigail Andrews

In the contemporary global political economy, migrant labor has become increasingly central to the survival of poor communities, requiring ever more individuals, families, and villages to live spatially extended lives. In the process, the meaning of “place” in migrant hometowns is being remade. In this talk, Professor Andrews use two in-depth case studies of Mexican migrant communities to examine the relationships between migrant sending and receiving sites. She suggests that migrant transnationalism is not limited to remittances (of money or ideas) but instead entails a “deep politics,” in which people’s understandings of “home” get remade.

Mexican hometowns’ particular experiences in US cities and economic niches, she suggests, transform members’ understandings of the meaning of “development.” As members compare between hometown and destination, they begin to redefine the idea of a better life. In turn, sending communities undertake new struggles for resources, rights, and recognition, in which their understandings of life in the California shape their engagement with the Mexican state. While these cross-border politics may echo US ideas, she shows, they may also reject first-world attitudes and exclusions, pushing, instead, to protect alternative ways of life.

 

 Professor Duquette-Rury received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2011. She has been published in Studies in Comparative International Development, Latin American Research Review and Migraciones Internacionales. She has  worked as an economic analyst for the Economic Research Service at the USDA and Nathan Associates, an economic consulting firm in Washington, D.C.. Most recently, she was a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation and the National Academies, the Tinker Foundation and the University of Chicago.

While the primary focus of  her research agenda investigates the impact of migration on sending countries, she is equally interested in the other side of the migratory circuit: destination countries. She has explored this in working papers concerning immigration and its effects on political membership, citizenship and ethnic organization.
AbigailAndrewsPhotoAbigail Andrews is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and a faculty member in the Urban Studies and Planning Program at the University of California, San Diego. She studies the politics of migration, development, and gender, and the interrelationships between Mexico and the United States.

Her research uses in-depth, comparative ethnography to understand cross-border Mexican migrant communities, with particular attention to gender transformations. She has also published articles on power dynamics within transnational social movements, and she is working on a book project that uses gender theory as the foundation for a critical sociology. She can be reached at alandrews@ucsd.edu.