April 8 – Social Sciences Supper Club – What’s Next for U.S. Immigration Reform and Border Enforcement?

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 – 5:30pm Special Reception & 6pm Talk & Dinner

RSVP Online by April 4 at alumni.ucsd.edu/supperclub

Supper-Club APR 8 2014 Invite (2)Supper-Club APR 8 2014 Invite (3)A comprehensive immigration reform bill backed by a bipartisan Senate majority and President Obama is currently causing tremendous controversy. This presentation will examine the political, demographic, and economic origins of immigration reform and the prospects for passage. Drawing on research conducted by UCSD students, we will discuss how current U.S. policies are affecting migration from Mexico to the United States.

With David FitzGerald, Co-Director of CCIS and the Gildred Chair in U.S.-Mexican Relations at UCSD

Supper Club events include a wine reception, full dinner and Faculty Club parking in addition to the lecture. $65 per person; $50 alumni price.

REPORT NOW AVAILABLE: Understanding Change in Science & Engineering – July 12 & 13 Workshop

CCISBuilding the Innovation Economy? The Challenges of Defining, Creating and Maintaining the STEM Workforce: 

For several years, policymakers in Washington, academic and other experts, and industry leaders have emphasized the importance of the so-called “STEM” fields—science, technology, engineering and math—for economic growth, national competitiveness and security, and job creation. Yet we still know little about how this crucial sector of the economy works, and in particular, why industry demands ever more foreign workers even as many US workers are leaving this vibrant sector, and how US workers keep their skill sets current in the face of continual change. Most broadly, we need to understand what STEM actually means. It is a term that is used widely, and even forms the basis of legislation, yet it resists a clear definition.

These are some major conclusions from a workshop held at the University of California-San Diego on July 12 and 13, 2013. The workshop, sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, brought together academic specialists from fields as diverse as economics, education, management, public policy, and sociology to meet with industry leaders representing biotech, finance, software, telecommunications, and tech journalism, for a results-oriented and wide-ranging discussion of these important issues. Several key conclusions, as well as related readings by workshop participants, are included.

Download here: CCIS.BuildingTheInnovationEconomy

16th Annual International Metropolis Conference

The 16th Annual International Metropolis Conference will take place in the Azores Islands, September 12-16, 2011.  Kathryn Kopinak (Senior Fellow), Rosa Soriano (former Visiting Fellow), Antonio Trinidad, and Jenna Hennebry will present in a panel titled “Exporting Goods, exporting workers? A comparative study of labour migration and export processing zones in Mexico and Morocco”.

For more, click here.

The Politics of Naturalization in Europe, Asia, and North America

Introduction and Panel 1. Europe
 

Panel 2. North America
 

Panel 3. Asia
 

Conference Report »

UC San Diego. May 20, 2011.

The Weaver Conference Center.

How do liberal states make immigrants into nationals? For some observers, a postnational future beckons in which universal rights of personhood strip national identity of its relevance for claiming the rights of citizenship. According to others, transnational migrants can pick and choose their affiliations to multiple polities. For still others, differences between liberal states are becoming obsolete either because official multiculturalism renders the idea of national core cultures illegitimate or the universalistic qualities of liberalism strips states of their national distinction. Even among scholars of nationality and citizenship, the issue of making national difference is often elided by a focus on those features of nationality law that are converging across liberal states.

To what extent is there a convergence in naturalization policies among liberal states that receive large numbers of immigrants? What explains the variation or convergence?

The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego, will host a conference to assess these questions on Friday, May 20, 2011. Funding is provided by a UCSD International, Comparative, and Area Studies (IIACAS) and Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) International Collaborative Research grant.

In order to RSVP for the event, please contact Ana Minvielle at aminvielle@ucsd.edu.

View Full Agenda »


“The Politics of Naturalization in Europe, Asia, and North America”

May 20, 2011 at CCIS

SCHEDULE (Rooms subject to change):


9:30-10am

COFFEE AND WELCOME

David FitzGerald, UC San Diego


10am-Noon

PANEL 1: EUROPE

Maarten Vink, Universiteit Maastricht, on national variation in the EU

Sara Wallace Goodman, UC Irvine, on citizenship tests in the EU

Alberto Martín-Pérez, University of Barcelona

Discussant: Jon Fox, University of Bristol


Noon-1pm

LUNCH


1-2:30pm

PANEL 2: NORTH AMERICA

Hiroshi Motomura, UCLA, on the U.S. case

Catherine Dauvergne, University of British Columbia, on the Canadian case

Discussant: Irene Bloemraad, UC Berkeley


2:30-3pm

BREAK


3-4:30pm

PANEL 3: ASIA

Kamal Sadiq, UC Irvine

John Skrentny and Gary Lee, UC San Diego

Discussant: Mara Loveman, University of Wisconsin

John Skrentny — Does Race-Consciousness Affect Diversity

AALS

John Skrentny presents research at the panel “Does Race-Consciousness Affect Diversity?” at the Association of American Law Schools 2011 Annual Meeting in San Francisco.  Other panelists included Richard T. Ford (Stanford Law School), Ann Morning (Sociology, NYU), Angela I. Onwuachi-Willig (University of Iowa College of Law), Camille Gear Rich (University of Southern California Gould School of Law), and Tristin K. Green (moderator, University of San Francisco School of Law).

Assessing the “Secure Communities” Program and the Impact of 287(g) Agreements

Co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida

November 18 2010, 8:45 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

The conference will include two roundtables, the first offering a macro analysis of immigration-related enforcement policies at the national level, the second focused on the experiences of communities throughout the country, where 287 (g) agreements and the Secure Communities program have been implemented. Speakers will include: Maria Hinojosa, senior correspondent, NOW on PBS; David Venturella, executive director, Secure Communities, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement; Don Kerwin, Vice President for Programs, Migration Policy Institute; Jen Smyers, Associate for Immigration and Refugee Policy, Church World Service; Daniel Hernández Joseph, Director General, Protection of Mexicans Abroad, Foreign Relations Ministry (Mexico); Michele Waslin, Senior Policy Analyst, Immigration Policy Center; Chris Newman, National Day Labor Organizing Network; Marty Rosenbluth, North Carolina Immigrant Rights Project; Adelina Nichols, Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights; Leni González, Virginia Latino Advisory Board; and, Brian Stout, Federal Government Liaison, Arlington County (Virginia).

12:00-12:30 p.m.: Presentation on local-level immigration enforcement in Nashville, TN by Amada Armenta, doctoral candidate, Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, and a Pre-doctoral Fellow at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, University of California, San Diego.

A live Webcast will be available at the link below:

View Full Agenda »

FitzGerald featured twice at Social Science History Association’s Annual Conference

SocialScienceHistoryAssc CCIS Associate Director David FitzGerald will be featured twice at the Social Science History Association‘s annual conference.   On Saturday, November 14, FitzGerald’s newest book, A Nation of Emigrants: How Mexico Manages its Migration is being discussed in an Author Meets Critics session.  Later that afternoon, FitzGerald will present in the session titled Law and Policies for Migrants and Refugees”  with other scholars including David Cook Martin, Simon Wegge, and Craig Bailey.