March 11: Ethnic Dating and Mate Selection with Cynthia Feliciano & Kevin Lewis

CCIS Spring Seminar Series

Ethnic Dating & Mate Selection

Cynthia Feliciano, Associate Professor of Sociology & Chicano/Latino Studies, UC Irvine
Kevin Lewis, Assistant Professor of Sociology, UC San Diego

Wednesday, March 11, 12:00pm 
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building 
Conference Room 115, First Floor

Lunch will be provided

In this panel, Prof. Feliciano and Prof. Lewis present overviews of their work using data from online dating websites to examine racial and ethnic preferences in dating. Feliciano will discuss her research using data on stated racial preferences to examine what they reveal about racial hierarchies, the incorporation of Asians and Latinos into the U.S. racial structure, and the heterogeneity among Latinos and multiracial groups. In his presentation, Lewis will draw from data on user behaviors in order to disentangle competing theories of attraction, document how preferences vary at different stages of interaction, and understand the strategies pursued by site users from different backgrounds.The panelists will comment on each other’s work; discuss the challenges and opportunities presented by using this type of data for research; and use this conversation as a springboard for a broader dialogue with the audience.

Cynthia Feliciano is Associate Professor of Sociology and Chicano/Latino Studies at the University of California, Irvine. Her research investigates the development and consequences of group boundaries and inequalities based on race, ethnicity, class, and gender. This work primarily, but not exclusively, focuses on how descendants of Latin American and Asian immigrants are incorporated in the United States, a question at the center of prominent theoretical debates, and of great practical importance given current demographic trends.

She pursues these issues through two main strands of research: 1) determinants of educational inequality and 2) ethnic and racial boundary-making and relations. Professor Feliciano is the author of Unequal Origins: Immigrant Selection and the Education of the Second Generation (LFB Scholarly 2006), and numerous articles in journals including Social Problems, Social Forces, Sociology of Education, Demography, and Social Science Quarterly. She received her B.A. from Boston University and her Ph.D. from UCLA, and has been a fellow of the Ford Foundation, the University of California President’s Postdoctoral Program and the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation.

Kevin Lewis is Assistant Professor of Sociology at UC San Diego. He received his BA in sociology and philosophy (mathematics minor) from UC San Diego and his MA and PhD in sociology from Harvard University. His research focuses on the formation and evolution of social networks, and addresses three general questions. First, what underlying micro-mechanisms give rise to observed network patterns? Second, what is the role of culture, and especially of cultural tastes, in social network dynamics? Third, what are the implications of these processes for the genesis and reproduction of inequality?

To answer these questions, he has analyzed a number of large-scale network datasets—spanning topics from online dating to internet activism to college students’ behavior on Facebook—and his work has been published in the American Journal of Sociology, the Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesSociological Science, and Social Networks. Lewis is also a Faculty Associate at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society.


For arrangements to accommodate a disability, contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at  deafhohrequest@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-9709 (TTY).

Feb 23: Authors Meet Critics with David FitzGerald and Natalia Molina

Authors Meet Critics: Book Panel for Culling the Masses and How Race is Made in America

David FitzGerald, Associate Professor of Sociology, UCSD – Culling the Masses
Natalia Molina, Associate Professor of History and Urban Studies, UCSD – How Race is Made in America
Nayan Shah, Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity and History. USC – Discussant



Monday, February 23, 12:00pm
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building
Conference Room 115, First Floor

*Lunch will be provided


Culling the MassesThe Democratic Origins of Racist Immigration Policy in the Americas questions the widely held view that in the long run democracy and racism cannot coexist. David Scott FitzGerald and David Cook-Martín show that democracies were the first countries in the Americas to select immigrants by race, and undemocratic states the first to outlaw discrimination. Through analysis of legal records from twenty-two countries between 1790 and 2010, the authors present a history of the rise and fall of racial selection in the Western Hemisphere.

The conventional claim that racism and democracy are antithetical—because democracy depends on ideals of equality and fairness, which are incompatible with the notion of racial inferiority—cannot explain why liberal democracies were leaders in promoting racist policies and laggards in eliminating them. Ultimately, the authors argue, the changed racial geopolitics of World War II and the Cold War was necessary to convince North American countries to reform their immigration and citizenship laws.


How Race Is Made in AmericaImmigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. These years shaped the emergence of what Natalia Molina describes as animmigration regime, which defined the racial categories that continue to influence perceptions in the United States about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity.

Prof. Molina introduces and explains her central theory, racial scripts, which highlights the ways in which the lives of racialized groups are linked across time and space and thereby affect one another. How Race Is Made in America also shows that these racial scripts are easily adopted and adapted to apply to different racial groups.


David Scott FitzGerald is the Theodore E. Gildred Chair in U.S.-Mexican Relations, Associate Professor of Sociology, and Co-Director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego. He is co-author of Culling the Masses: The Democratic Roots of Racist Immigration Policy in the Americas (Harvard University Press, 2014); author of A Nation of Emigrants: How Mexico Manages its Migration (University of California Press, 2009), and co-editor of six books on Mexico-U.S. migration.
FitzGerald’s work on the politics of international migration, transnationalism, and research methodology has been published in journals such as the American Journal of Sociology, International Migration Review, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Qualitative Sociology, New York University Law Review, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, and Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. His current project examines asylum policies in comparative perspective.

Natalia Associate is Professor of History and Urban Studies and Associate Vice Chancellor for Faculty Diversity and Equity at the University of California, San Diego. Her first book, Fit to be Citizens? Public Health and Race in Los Angeles, 1879-1939, explored the ways in which race is constructed relationally and regionally. In that work, which garnered the Noris and Carol Hundley book prize of the PCB-American Historical Association, she argues that race must be understood comparatively in order to see how the laws, practices, and attitudes directed at one racial group affected others. Fit to Be Citizens?demonstrates how both science and public health shaped the meaning of race in the early twentieth century.
Professor Molina  previously served as the Associate Dean for Arts and Humanities and before that as the Director for University of California Education Abroad Program in Granada, Córdoba, and Cádiz, Spain.

Nayan Shah is Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at University of Southern California. He previously worked as a professor of history at University of California, San Diego and State University of New York Binghamton. Prof. Shah’s research and teaching focuses on the struggles over state authority in relation to the politics of race and gender. His research is most well known for its reconceptualization of how racial meanings are constituted through the articulations of gender and sexuality in state politics and culture. Prof. Shah’s first book, Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown, examined the history of San Francisco Chinatown through the prism of public health and policy. It won the Association of Asian American Studies History Book Prize in 2002.
In Stranger Intimacy: Contesting Race, Sexuality, and the Law in the North American West, Prof. Shah explored the contestations over the meanings of state power and citizenship through the social relationships that arose among South Asian migrants in northwestern United States and Canada in the twentieth century. He currently serves as editor for the GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies.

 

Feb 12: Recognizing Refugees from the Hemispheric Drug War with Everard Meade

Children of Impunity and Ignominy: Recognizing Refugees from the Hemispheric Drug War

Thursday, January 22, 12:10pm 
California Western School of Law
Room 2F

Everard MeadeDr. Everard Meade is the Director of the Trans-Border Institute (TBI) at the University of San Diego. Dr. Meade received a PhD in History from the University of Chicago and is a published scholar with extensive experience teaching courses on the history of Mexico, U.S. relations with Latin America and human rights.

He was co-founder of the Eleanor Roosevelt College Human Rights Minor Program at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Meade’s most recent research focuses on individuals and families who have fled violence in Mexico and Central America. For the past fifteen years, Dr. Meade has also served as advisor, activist, expert witness and grant writer raising funds for the Chicago-based National Immigrant Justice Center.

This presentation is a part of the Seeking Asylum in North America speaker series, co-sponsored by the California Western School of Law, the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies and the Scholars Strategy Network.

Feb 9: The Latinos of Asia with Anthony Ocampo – CCIS Seminar

Anthony C. Ocampo. Assistant Professor of Sociology, Cal Poly Pomona

Monday, February 9, 12:00pm

Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building

Conference Room 115, First Floor

 

The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race

Mass migration from Latin America and Asia is dramatically changing the racial landscape of our nation. In California, Latinos and Asians already collectively constitute the majority in large metropolitan areas, a demographic shift that is reshaping the way children of immigrants are racially incorporated into American society. To date, race scholars treat Latinos and Asians as two distinct panethnic categories. In this presentation, Professor Ocampo examines how Filipino Americans, the largest Asian group in the state, disrupt this conventional divide and negotiate their racial identity within an emerging Latino-Asian racial spectrum.

Drawing on interviews and survey data of Filipino Americans in Southern California, Professor Ocampo demonstrates how multiethnic contexts interact with historical factors to influence Filipino racial formation. I argue that the cultural residuals of Spanish and U.S. colonialism affect how Filipinos racially position themselves vis-à-vis Latinos and Asians, the two fastest growing panethnic groups in the country. These findings have implications for better understanding how the racialization process is evolving as the United States moves beyond a black-white racial paradigm.

Anthony OcampoDr. Anthony Ocampo is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona. His award-winning research and teaching focuses on the experiences of minority groups in the United States. He has published research on the cultural and educational experiences of Latinos, Asian Americans, and LGBT people in the U.S. in Ethnic and Racial Studies, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Latino Studies, and Journal of Asian American Studies. He is currently working on two books on immigration, which are under contract with Stanford University Press and NYU Press.

Jan 22: What Makes a Political Refugee ‘Political’? with James Hathaway – IICAS Seminar

James C . Hathaway, Director of the Program in Refugee and Asylum Law, University of Michigan

Thursday, January 22, 4:00pm

Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building

Conference Room 115, First Floor

 

What Makes a Political Refugee ‘Political’?

James HathawayJames C. Hathaway, the James E. and Sarah A. Degan Professor of Law at the University of Michigan, is a leading authority on international refugee law whose work is regularly cited by the most senior courts of the common law world. He is the founding director of Michigan Law’s Program in Refugee and Asylum Law, Distinguished Visiting Professor of International Refugee Law at the University of Amsterdam, and Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne.

Professor Hathaway’s publications include The Law of Refugee Status (2014), with Michelle Foster; Transnational Law: Cases and Materials (2013), with Mathias Reimann, Timothy Dickinson, and Joel Samuels; Human Rights and Refugee Law (2013); The Rights of Refugees Under International Law (2005); Reconceiving International Refugee Law (1997); and more than 80 journal articles. He is founding patron and senior adviser to Asylum Access, a nonprofit organization committed to delivering innovative legal aid to refugees in the global South, and counsel on international protection to the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants.

This presentation is a part of the Seeking Asylum in North America speaker series, co-sponsored by the California Western School of Law, the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies and the Scholars Strategy Network.

 

Nov 12 – Migrant Engagement in Mexican Hometown Politics w/ Lauren Duquette-Rury & Abigail Andrews

A Panel with:
Lauren Duquette-Rury, Assistant Professor of Sociology, UCLA
Abigail Andrews, Assistant Professor of Sociology, UCSD 

Wednesday, November 12, 12:00pm
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building 
Conference Room 115, First Floor

“Voice and Exit: Remittances and Local Participatory Governance in Mexico” with Lauren Duquette-Rury

Contemporary debates on the relationship between migration and development focus extensively on how migrant remittances affect the economies of sending countries. Yet, remittancesalso produce political consequences in migrants’ hometowns, but have received less attention in scholarly accounts. This presentation focuses on the ways in which exit from the polity and the acquisition of remittances abroad create political opportunities for migrant groups to exercise voice in the coproduction of public services in their hometowns.

First, the presentation presents a theory to explain the conditions under which coproduction affects the quality of local democracy. Second, using three comparative case studies based on fieldwork in Mexico, the presentation process-traces central causal mechanisms over time to reveal the impact of coproduction on participation and state-society relations. Research suggests that when transnational coproduction embeds local citizens, migrants and local government officials into the process, coproduction produces more participatory governance. However, given weak local-state capacity and migrants’ constricted social bases in their hometown communities, equitable participatory governance is often challenging to achieve through transnational coproduction.

“Remaking ‘Home’: The Cross-Border Politics of Rural Mexican Transformation” with Abigail Andrews

In the contemporary global political economy, migrant labor has become increasingly central to the survival of poor communities, requiring ever more individuals, families, and villages to live spatially extended lives. In the process, the meaning of “place” in migrant hometowns is being remade. In this talk, Professor Andrews use two in-depth case studies of Mexican migrant communities to examine the relationships between migrant sending and receiving sites. She suggests that migrant transnationalism is not limited to remittances (of money or ideas) but instead entails a “deep politics,” in which people’s understandings of “home” get remade.

Mexican hometowns’ particular experiences in US cities and economic niches, she suggests, transform members’ understandings of the meaning of “development.” As members compare between hometown and destination, they begin to redefine the idea of a better life. In turn, sending communities undertake new struggles for resources, rights, and recognition, in which their understandings of life in the California shape their engagement with the Mexican state. While these cross-border politics may echo US ideas, she shows, they may also reject first-world attitudes and exclusions, pushing, instead, to protect alternative ways of life.

 

 Professor Duquette-Rury received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2011. She has been published in Studies in Comparative International Development, Latin American Research Review and Migraciones Internacionales. She has  worked as an economic analyst for the Economic Research Service at the USDA and Nathan Associates, an economic consulting firm in Washington, D.C.. Most recently, she was a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation and the National Academies, the Tinker Foundation and the University of Chicago.

While the primary focus of  her research agenda investigates the impact of migration on sending countries, she is equally interested in the other side of the migratory circuit: destination countries. She has explored this in working papers concerning immigration and its effects on political membership, citizenship and ethnic organization.
AbigailAndrewsPhotoAbigail Andrews is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and a faculty member in the Urban Studies and Planning Program at the University of California, San Diego. She studies the politics of migration, development, and gender, and the interrelationships between Mexico and the United States.

Her research uses in-depth, comparative ethnography to understand cross-border Mexican migrant communities, with particular attention to gender transformations. She has also published articles on power dynamics within transnational social movements, and she is working on a book project that uses gender theory as the foundation for a critical sociology. She can be reached at alandrews@ucsd.edu.

June 4 – Martin Schain – Immigration Policy: A Transatlantic Perspective

CCIS Spring Seminar Series

Martin A. Schain, Professor of Politics, New York University
Wednesday, June 4, 12:00pm 
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building 
Conference Room 115, First Floor


Immigration Policy: A Transatlantic Perspective

Although the failures of American policy in dealing with undocumented  immigration and immigrants now residing in the United States have been politically front and center for most of the past decade, the comparative success of policies on legal entry and integration have generally gone unnoticed.

In Europe, with few exceptions, policy on immigration has been poorly defined and often contradictory. The gap between policy outputs and outcomes has been considerable and appears to have nurtured the breakthrough and growth of radical-right political parties. Therefore, the lessons to be learned from Europe are generally negative—what not to do and how not to do it. I will examine three aspects of immigration policy in Europe and the United States: entry policy, integration policy, and border enforcement.


Martin A. Schain is Professor of Politics at New York University.  He is the author of The Politics of Immigration in France, Britain and the United States: A Comparative Study (New York: Palgrave, 2008/2012); French Communism and Local Power (St. Martin’s, 1985); co-editor and author of Shadows Over Europe: The Development and Impact of the Extreme Right in Europe (Palgrave, 2002); The Politics of Immigration in Western Europe (Cass, 1994); and co-editor of Europe Without Borders: Remapping Territory, Citizenship, and Identity in a Transnational Age (Johns Hopkins, 2003).  He has also pub­lished numerous scholarly articles on politics and immigration in Europe and the United States, the politics of the extreme right in France, and immigration and the European Union.  He has taught in France, and lectured through­out Eu­rope.  Professor Schain is the founder and former director of the Center for European Studies at NYU, and former chair of the European Union Studies Association.  He is co-editor of the transatlantic scholarly journal, Comparative European Politics

May 28 – Rainer Bauböck – Territorial and Cultural Inclusion: Comparing Citizenship Policies in Europe

CCIS Spring Seminar

Rainer Bauböck, Professor of Social and Political Theory, European University Institute


Wednesday, May 28, 12:00pm 

Territorial and Cultural Inclusion: Comparing Citizenship Policies in Europe

Comparative analyses of citizenship laws have often suggested that these are shaped either by civic or ethnic conceptions of political community. Yet citizenship laws pursue many different purposes that cannot be captured by a civic-ethnic dichotomy. As Rainer Bauböck  and Maarten Vink  have shown in a 2013 paper, territorial and ethnocultural inclusion are better understood as independent dimensions that generate four different citizenship regimes: those that are either ethnoculturally or territorially inclusive, expansive regimes that combine both types of inclusion and isolationist ones that are restrictive on both. In a new paper (co-authored with Costica Dumbrava),  fuzzy set QCA methodology is used to examine the conditions under which states are likely to fall into one of these four categories.


Rainer BaubockRainer Bauböck holds a chair in social and political theory at the Department of Political and Social Sciences of the European University Institute. He is on leave from the Austrian Academy of Sciences. His research interests are in normative political theory and comparative research on democratic citizenship, European integration, migration, nationalism and minority rights. Together with Jo Shaw (University of Edinburgh) and Maarten Vink (University of Maastricht), he coordinates the European Union Democracy Observatory on Citizenship at http://eudo-citizenship.eu.

May 19 – Scott Blinder – A Public of Two Minds: Opposition to Immigration and Support for Extreme Right Parties – CCIS Spring Seminar

Scott Blinder, Director of the Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford

Monday, May 19, 12:00pm 
*Lunch will be provided

“A Public of Two Minds: Social Norms, Opposition to Immigration and Support for Extreme Right Parties” The politics of immigration in Europe presents a two-sided puzzle: with anti-immigration sentiments so strong and widespread, why do most anti-immigration parties fail? And, on the other side, why does anti-immigration sentiment persist despite broad acceptance of anti-prejudice norms?  Scott Blinder accouts for these tensions by developing a dual process model of political behavior. Negative socially-shared understandings of “immigrants” shape underlying attitudes, but at the same time internalized anti-prejudice norms provide sharp limits on how far these underlying attitudes can shape political behavior. Supporting evidence comes from original surveys conducted in Britain and Germany, with embedded survey experiments, as well as automated textual analysis of 58,000 articles in British newspapers that mention immigration.

Blinder-migobs Scott Blinder is currently Director of the University of Oxford’s Migration Observatory, a project of COMPAS (Centre on Migration, Policy and Society). In the fall he will take up a faculty position in the Department of Political Science at UMass-Amherst. Blinder’s research focuses mainly on attitudes toward immigration and integration, with a particular interest in how the social norm against prejudice shapes both positive and negative responses to national, ethnic, and religious differences. He also leads a project that monitors and analyzes media coverage of migration, and has conducted work explaining the gender gap in partisanship in the US. His work has appeared in leading academic journals in the US and UK and has been discussed in a wide variety of venues by NGOs, civil servants, and government ministers.

 

April 16 – Celia Falicov and Ellen Beck – Providing Culturally Responsive and Empowering Services for Latino Families – CCIS Spring Seminar

 

Celia Falicov, Clinical Professor, UCSD Family & Preventive Medicine & UCSD Psychiatry
Ellen Beck, Clinical Professor, UCSD Family & Preventive Medicine
Lunch will be provided

A variety of professionals such as health and mental health providers, teachers and lawyers will increasingly work with Latino immigrants of various generations. The commonly used, one-size fits all conceptual and practice approach is insufficient to provide effective services. The more recent “cultural competence” emphasis on ethnic characteristics is often formulaic and stereotyped.This discussion presents a strength-based framework that takes the complexities of cultural diversity and ecological stressors into account, with an emphasis on the impact of migration on core family relationships, such as parent-child and couples.

Celia Jaes Falicov, Ph.D. is a renowned family therapy author, teacher, and clinician, widely respected for her expertise on immigrant families and particularly Latino families. She is Clinical Professor, Department of Family & Preventive Medicine & Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego. She is Past President of the American Family Therapy Academy. Dr. Falicov, who grew up in Argentina, received a Ph.D. in Human Development, the University of Chicago. She has pioneered writings on family transitions, migration, culture and context in clinical practice and has received many professional awards for her distinguished contributions. Her books include Cultural Perspectives in Family Therapy; Family Transitions: Continuity and Change over the Life Cycle, and the widely praised Latino Families in Therapy (2nd Edition, 2014).
Dr. Ellen Beck is Director of Medical Student Education for the Division of Family Medicine at UCSD School of Medicine.  A family physician, she is Co-Founder and Director of the UCSD Student-Run Free Clinic Project,  Director of the national faculty development program, Addressing the Health Needs of the Underserved, as well as a  yearlong Fellowship in Underserved Health Care, the first in the nation.

Dr. Beck and her programs have won awards including the 2013 Kennedy Center/Steven Sondheim Inspirational Teacher Award, 2012 WebMD Magazine Health Hero Award, 2010 James Irvine Foundation California Leadership Award, 2010 KPBS Local Hero Diversity Award, 2008 LEAD San Diego Visionary Award for Diversity, Norman Cousins Award for a medical education program that fosters relationship-centered care, and Society of Teachers of Family Medicine national Innovation award. The free clinic project was featured in a PBS special on integrative medicine called The New Medicine.

 

Co-sponsored by 


For arrangements to accommodate a disability, contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at  deafhohrequest@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-9709 (TTY).