June 4 – Martin Schain – Immigration Policy: A Transatlantic Perspective

CCIS Spring Seminar Series

Martin A. Schain, Professor of Politics, New York University
Wednesday, June 4, 12:00pm 
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building 
Conference Room 115, First Floor


Immigration Policy: A Transatlantic Perspective

Although the failures of American policy in dealing with undocumented  immigration and immigrants now residing in the United States have been politically front and center for most of the past decade, the comparative success of policies on legal entry and integration have generally gone unnoticed.

In Europe, with few exceptions, policy on immigration has been poorly defined and often contradictory. The gap between policy outputs and outcomes has been considerable and appears to have nurtured the breakthrough and growth of radical-right political parties. Therefore, the lessons to be learned from Europe are generally negative—what not to do and how not to do it. I will examine three aspects of immigration policy in Europe and the United States: entry policy, integration policy, and border enforcement.


Martin A. Schain is Professor of Politics at New York University.  He is the author of The Politics of Immigration in France, Britain and the United States: A Comparative Study (New York: Palgrave, 2008/2012); French Communism and Local Power (St. Martin’s, 1985); co-editor and author of Shadows Over Europe: The Development and Impact of the Extreme Right in Europe (Palgrave, 2002); The Politics of Immigration in Western Europe (Cass, 1994); and co-editor of Europe Without Borders: Remapping Territory, Citizenship, and Identity in a Transnational Age (Johns Hopkins, 2003).  He has also pub­lished numerous scholarly articles on politics and immigration in Europe and the United States, the politics of the extreme right in France, and immigration and the European Union.  He has taught in France, and lectured through­out Eu­rope.  Professor Schain is the founder and former director of the Center for European Studies at NYU, and former chair of the European Union Studies Association.  He is co-editor of the transatlantic scholarly journal, Comparative European Politics

May 28 – Rainer Bauböck – Territorial and Cultural Inclusion: Comparing Citizenship Policies in Europe

CCIS Spring Seminar

Rainer Bauböck, Professor of Social and Political Theory, European University Institute


Wednesday, May 28, 12:00pm 

Territorial and Cultural Inclusion: Comparing Citizenship Policies in Europe

Comparative analyses of citizenship laws have often suggested that these are shaped either by civic or ethnic conceptions of political community. Yet citizenship laws pursue many different purposes that cannot be captured by a civic-ethnic dichotomy. As Rainer Bauböck  and Maarten Vink  have shown in a 2013 paper, territorial and ethnocultural inclusion are better understood as independent dimensions that generate four different citizenship regimes: those that are either ethnoculturally or territorially inclusive, expansive regimes that combine both types of inclusion and isolationist ones that are restrictive on both. In a new paper (co-authored with Costica Dumbrava),  fuzzy set QCA methodology is used to examine the conditions under which states are likely to fall into one of these four categories.


Rainer BaubockRainer Bauböck holds a chair in social and political theory at the Department of Political and Social Sciences of the European University Institute. He is on leave from the Austrian Academy of Sciences. His research interests are in normative political theory and comparative research on democratic citizenship, European integration, migration, nationalism and minority rights. Together with Jo Shaw (University of Edinburgh) and Maarten Vink (University of Maastricht), he coordinates the European Union Democracy Observatory on Citizenship at http://eudo-citizenship.eu.

May 19 – Scott Blinder – A Public of Two Minds: Opposition to Immigration and Support for Extreme Right Parties – CCIS Spring Seminar

Scott Blinder, Director of the Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford

Monday, May 19, 12:00pm 
*Lunch will be provided

“A Public of Two Minds: Social Norms, Opposition to Immigration and Support for Extreme Right Parties” The politics of immigration in Europe presents a two-sided puzzle: with anti-immigration sentiments so strong and widespread, why do most anti-immigration parties fail? And, on the other side, why does anti-immigration sentiment persist despite broad acceptance of anti-prejudice norms?  Scott Blinder accouts for these tensions by developing a dual process model of political behavior. Negative socially-shared understandings of “immigrants” shape underlying attitudes, but at the same time internalized anti-prejudice norms provide sharp limits on how far these underlying attitudes can shape political behavior. Supporting evidence comes from original surveys conducted in Britain and Germany, with embedded survey experiments, as well as automated textual analysis of 58,000 articles in British newspapers that mention immigration.

Blinder-migobs Scott Blinder is currently Director of the University of Oxford’s Migration Observatory, a project of COMPAS (Centre on Migration, Policy and Society). In the fall he will take up a faculty position in the Department of Political Science at UMass-Amherst. Blinder’s research focuses mainly on attitudes toward immigration and integration, with a particular interest in how the social norm against prejudice shapes both positive and negative responses to national, ethnic, and religious differences. He also leads a project that monitors and analyzes media coverage of migration, and has conducted work explaining the gender gap in partisanship in the US. His work has appeared in leading academic journals in the US and UK and has been discussed in a wide variety of venues by NGOs, civil servants, and government ministers.

 

April 16 – Celia Falicov and Ellen Beck – Providing Culturally Responsive and Empowering Services for Latino Families – CCIS Spring Seminar

 

Celia Falicov, Clinical Professor, UCSD Family & Preventive Medicine & UCSD Psychiatry
Ellen Beck, Clinical Professor, UCSD Family & Preventive Medicine
Lunch will be provided

A variety of professionals such as health and mental health providers, teachers and lawyers will increasingly work with Latino immigrants of various generations. The commonly used, one-size fits all conceptual and practice approach is insufficient to provide effective services. The more recent “cultural competence” emphasis on ethnic characteristics is often formulaic and stereotyped.This discussion presents a strength-based framework that takes the complexities of cultural diversity and ecological stressors into account, with an emphasis on the impact of migration on core family relationships, such as parent-child and couples.

Celia Jaes Falicov, Ph.D. is a renowned family therapy author, teacher, and clinician, widely respected for her expertise on immigrant families and particularly Latino families. She is Clinical Professor, Department of Family & Preventive Medicine & Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego. She is Past President of the American Family Therapy Academy. Dr. Falicov, who grew up in Argentina, received a Ph.D. in Human Development, the University of Chicago. She has pioneered writings on family transitions, migration, culture and context in clinical practice and has received many professional awards for her distinguished contributions. Her books include Cultural Perspectives in Family Therapy; Family Transitions: Continuity and Change over the Life Cycle, and the widely praised Latino Families in Therapy (2nd Edition, 2014).
Dr. Ellen Beck is Director of Medical Student Education for the Division of Family Medicine at UCSD School of Medicine.  A family physician, she is Co-Founder and Director of the UCSD Student-Run Free Clinic Project,  Director of the national faculty development program, Addressing the Health Needs of the Underserved, as well as a  yearlong Fellowship in Underserved Health Care, the first in the nation.

Dr. Beck and her programs have won awards including the 2013 Kennedy Center/Steven Sondheim Inspirational Teacher Award, 2012 WebMD Magazine Health Hero Award, 2010 James Irvine Foundation California Leadership Award, 2010 KPBS Local Hero Diversity Award, 2008 LEAD San Diego Visionary Award for Diversity, Norman Cousins Award for a medical education program that fosters relationship-centered care, and Society of Teachers of Family Medicine national Innovation award. The free clinic project was featured in a PBS special on integrative medicine called The New Medicine.

 

Co-sponsored by 


For arrangements to accommodate a disability, contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at  deaf-hohrequest@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-9709 (TTY).

April 10 – Foreign Detachment: The Making and Unmaking of Cross-Border Ties – Research Seminar

Thursday, April 10th, 12:30pm
Social Science Building, Room 101

This event is jointly sponsored by the UCSD Sociology Department and CCIS.


rogerRoger Waldinger is a Distinguished Professor of Sociology at UCLA. He has worked on international migration throughout his career, writing on a broad set of topics, including immigrant entrepreneurship, labor markets, assimilation, the second generation, high-skilled immigration, immigration policy, and public opinion. The author of six books, most recently, How the Other Half Works: Immigration and the Social Organization of Labor (University of California Press, 2003), he is a 2008 Guggenheim Fellow; his research has been supported by grants from the Ford, Haines, Mellon, National Science, Sloan and Russell Sage Foundations.

April 2 – Who Favors Employment Discrimination Against Immigrants? – CCIS Spring Seminar

Wednesday, April 2, 12:00pm 
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building 
Conference Room 115, First Floor
 Reception will follow


Please join Abdeslam Marfouk for his presentation concerning European perceptions of immigration and employment rights.

Utilizing data from the European Values ​​Study (EVS), the seminar focuses on European attitudes towards immigrants, especially European preference for discrimination against immigrants in terms of access to jobs.

On average, 67 percent of European Union citizens agree with the statement that when jobs are scarce, employers should give priority to citizens over non-naturalized immigrants. The main objective of this talk is to answer to the following question: “Who favors discriminating against immigrants’ access to jobs?” and examine the relationship between the clichés against immigration and this discrimination.


Marfouk, Abdeslam

Dr. Abdeslam Marfouk is research fellow at the Institut Wallon de l´Evaluation, de la Prospective et de la Statistique (IWEPS) and Research Associate at the Department of Economic (DULBEA) of the Universite Libre de Bruxelles [ULB], Belgium. Currently, he is a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies
 (CCIS) of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). He has authored research reports, books chapters and articles in international journals addressing different issues in international migration.

March 3 – U.S. and Foreign STEM PhD’s: Jobs and Workforce (Mis)Matches – CCIS Seminar

CCIS Winter Seminar Series
U.S. and Foreign STEM PhD’s:
Job Preferences, Job Availability and Workforce (Mis)Matches

 


Please join Michael Roach & discussant Kim Barrett, Dean of Graduate Studies at UCSD for this illuminating seminar on immigration and the state of the STEM PhD workforce.Debates regarding immigration reform have highlighted the widening imbalance between the public and private sector STEM PhD workforce. Some argue that the growing number of STEM PhD’s has made it increasingly difficult for graduates to find desirable jobs, forcing them to pursue temporary postdoctoral positions or employment in the private sector in lieu of more preferred faculty careers.On the other hand, there is a rising chorus from both policy makers and firms over the need for a larger STEM PhD workforce in the private sector, with some looking toward immigration reform as an immediate means to satisfy the growing demand for highly skilled workers through the hiring of foreign-born doctorates.Despite the importance of STEM PhD’s to all sectors of the U.S. economy, there is surprisingly little empirical evidence on the drivers of STEM PhDs’ initial career choices. This talk will present new findings from micro panel survey data on the role of career preferences, ability, and labor market conditions in shaping the career choices of recent STEM PhD graduates. These data not only document the potential (mis)match between PhDs’ preferred careers and their actual career outcomes, but they also provide insights into which individuals may be more responsive to policies encouraging private sector employment.


michael_roachMichael Roach is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. His research investigates the research activities and career choices of science and engineering PhD’s, with a particular emphasis on the role of graduate students and faculty in the commercialization of university research and academic entrepreneurship. He also examines the impact of university research on firm innovation and firm patenting strategies.

 

kim_barretKim Barrett joined the faculty of UCSD School of Medicine in 1985, and rose to her current rank of Professor of Medicine in 1996. Her research interests center on the normal and abnormal biology of the intestinal epithelium and their relevance to a variety of digestive diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases, infectious diarrheal diseases, and peptic ulcer disease. She has received a number of honors for her research, including the Bowditch and Davenport Lectureships of the American Physiological Society, and being awarded the degree of Doctor of Medical Science, honoris causa, by Queens University Belfast. She is also the author or editor of several books and monographs and almost two hundred peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters and reviews. In 2006, she was appointed as Dean of Graduate Studies at UCSD.


*Please feel free to bring a lunch.

All CCIS research seminars are podcasted. Search “center for comparative immigration studies” on iTunes and listen to our seminars on the go!For arrangements to accommodate a disability, contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at deaf-hohrequest@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-9709 (TTY).

U.S. High Skilled Immigration: Problems, Misconceptions, and Solutions – Feb. 19

Ron Hira, Associate Professor of Public Policy, Rochester Institute of Technology

Join Ron Hira  & discussant Peter Gourevitch as they discuss reform of U.S. immigration policy, on the congressional agenda for the first time since 2007.While the most contentious elements of the policy debate surround the 11 million undocumented living in the U.S., the policy proposals for re-shaping high skilled immigration are also controversial. This talk will cover the perceived problems with current high skilled immigration policy. It will also explore common misconceptions that distort the public discussion. High skilled immigration is a source of vibrancy for the U.S., especially in technology and research sectors, so getting the policies correct is of great importance to the nation’s innovation system.Using new government data, obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, Dr. Hira will present a clearer picture about how high-skill guest worker visas, such as the H-1B, and legal permanent residence visas are actually used.

Ron Hira is Associate Professor and Acting Chair of the Department of Public Policy at Rochester Institute of Technology. He specializes in policy issues on technological innovation, offshoring, high-skill immigration, and the American engineering workforce. Ron is also a Research Associate with the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, DC.

He is co-author of the book, Outsourcing America (AMCOM, 2nd edition 2008), which was a finalist for best business book in the PMA’s Benjamin Franklin Awards. The Boston Globe called the work an “honest, disturbing look at outsourcing.” The Washington Post described the book as a “thorough and easy to grasp primer on the wrenching outsourcing debate.”In 2007, Ron served as a consultant to the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Science & Technology helping to organize a series of hearings on the Globalization of Innovation and Research & Development.

Peter A. Gourevitch is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at  UCSD’s School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, of which he is also the Founding Dean.
As a world-renowned expert on international relations and comparative politics, Gourevitch specializes in corporate governance systems in a globalizing world economy, comparing differences in the way countries structure companies and their relationship to shareholders.  His work includes a particular focus on national responses to pressures arising from international trade and economic globalization, trade disputes among countries, and international trade negotiations. Recently he has been working on corporate social responsibility and the relationship between NGO’s, regulation and international institutionsHis books include Politics in Hard Times: Comparative Responses to International Crises (Cornell, 1986) and  Political Power and Corporate Control : The New Global Politics of Corporate Control (Princeton, 2005). Other publications focus on U.S.-Japan relations after the Cold War and international economic relations.  From 1996 to 2001 he co-edited, with David Lake, International Organization, a leading scholarly journal on international relations.


*Please feel free to bring a lunch.

All CCIS research seminars are podcasted.  Search “center for comparative immigration studies” on iTunes and listen to our seminars on the go!

For arrangements to accommodate a disability, contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at  deaf-hohrequest@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-9709 (TTY).

 

CCIS Fall Seminar – American Values: Migrants, Money and Meaning

Seminar to be held on Wednesday, December 4th in ERC 115. Event begins at 12:00PM.

Author Meets Critics: Join David Pedersen, Beatriz Cortez and David Gutierrez as they discuss Mr. Pedersen’s book American Value: Migrants, Money and Meaning in El Salvador and the United States.

El Salvador has transformed dramatically over the past half-century. Historically reliant on cash crops like coffee and cotton, the country emerged from a civil war in 1992 to find much of its national wealth coming from money sent home by a massive emigrant workforce in the United States.  In American Value, David Pedersen examines this new way of life across two places: Intipucá in El Salvador and Washington, DC in the USA.  Drawing on Charles S. Pierce to craft a highly innovative semiotic of value, he critically explains how the apparent worthiness of migrants and their money is shaping a transnational moral world with implications well beyond El Salvador and the USA.

David PedersonDavid Pedersen

Associate Professor of Anthropology – UCSD

w/ Beatriz Cortez, Professor of Central American Studies – CSUN

& David Gutierrez, Professor of History – UCSD

The Price of Rights: Regulating International Labor Migration

Seminar to be held on Wednesday, October 23rd at 12:00 pm in ERC 115.

Many low-income countries and development organizations are calling for greater liberalization of labor immigration policies in high-income countries. At the same time, human rights organizations and migrant rights advocates demand more equal rights for migrant workers. Martin Ruhs’ The Price of Rights shows why you cannot always have both.

Martin Ruhs analyzes how high-income countries restrict the rights of migrant workers as part of their labor immigration policies and discusses the implications for global debates about regulating labor migration and protecting migrants. His book comprehensively looks at the tensions between human rights and citizenship rights, the agency and interests of migrants and states, and the determinants and ethics of labor immigration policy.

RuhsMartin Ruhs

Assistant Professor in Political Economy
Oxford University

Member, UK Migration Advisory Committee (MAC)