John Skrentny and Gary Lee to present at “The Nation and Citizen in Transformation” conference at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, May 6-7.

John Skrentny and Gary Lee will present their paper, “Nationhood and Multiculturalism in Industrialized East Asia,” at a conference on “The Nation and Citizen in Transformation: Making and Unmaking of Transnationalism in East Asia.”  The conference will take place on May 6-7 at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

For details, click here.

Amada Armenta — Policing Immigrants or Immigration? The Implementation of 287(g) in Nashville

 

Seminar to be held in ERC 115 at 2:00 pm.
Amada Armenta will discuss her research on the implementation of the 287(g) program in Nashville, Tennessee. In April 2007, the Davidson County Sheriff’s Office began implementing the 287(g) program, which allows trained Sheriff’s deputies to screen all foreign born arrestees for immigration status and process them for removal. This particular paper focuses on how (or if) the adoption of the 287(g) program in Davidson County, affects the daily practices of city police officers whose arrests subject immigrants to screening in the jail, but who do not have immigration enforcement authority. Based on ride-alongs and interviews with Nashville police officers, Armenta’s research examines how field-level officers decide whether to arrest immigrants on misdemeanor violations to state law. Her findings show how officer behavior motivated by formal and de facto police department policies, create the perception that police are targeting immigrants for enforcement.

Amada Armenta is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at UCLA and a Predoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at UC San Diego. Her research has been supported by various organizations including the National Science Foundation, the American Society of Criminology, the American Sociological Association, the Social Science Research Council, and the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies. She has presented professional papers at numerous national conferences, and has been published in International Migration Review, Qualitative Sociology, and Work and Occupations. Her current research focuses on the politics and implementation of the 287(g) program in Nashville, Tennessee.

CCIS at the Midwest Political Science Association meeting

CCIS Director John Skrentny will be presenting “Obama and Immigration Reform: A Tough Sell for a Grand Bargain” at the meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association in Chicago, March 31-April 3, 2011. CCIS Research Claire Adida will be presenting “Gender and Generosity: Problems in Islamic Integration into France” at the same meeting.

Information about the conference »

Randall Hansen – States, Migration, and International Cooperation: Can there be a global migration regime?

 

States, Migration, and International Cooperation: Can there be a global migration regime?

Seminar to be held in ERC 115 at 2:00 pm.

Within the migration literature and policy circles, there is a enthusiasm for the international governance of migration. At their most ambitious, scholars hope to see the emergence of a global migration governance regime that would do for voluntary migration what the UNHCR has done for forced migration. Drawing on a three-year research project, Hanson’s paper critically examines global migration governance and explores the extent to which there can be any international cooperation of migration.

The paper begins with the assumption that cooperation in the area of migration is not natural; indeed, it is exceptionally difficult. States are rational, not altruistic (that is, they are motivated by that which benefits them and their electorates), and they are jealous guardians of power. It then makes three arguments. First, migration is not, as some argue, a public good (a good whose benefits are non-excludable), and therefore not an area in which there is a natural incentive to cooperate. Second, where cooperation occurs it is likely to be bilateral if it is formal, regional if it is informal, and rarely if ever global. The greatest scope for international cooperation is, therefore, to be found in informal, regional cooperation over migration Third, in terms of institutionalization, more is less: international cooperation will achieve more in substantive policy terms when it is informal, non-binding, and relatively closed to public scrutiny.

Randall Hansen is a Full Professor and Canada Research Chair in Immigration & Governance in the department of political science at the University of Toronto. His work covers immigration and citizenship and political history. He is author of  Citizenship and Immigration in Post-War Britain (OUP, 2000), Towards a European Nationality (w. P. Weil, Palgrave, 2001), Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. and Europe (w. P. Weil, Berghahn, 2002), Immigration and asylum from 1900 to the present [w. M. Gibney, ABC-CLIO, 2005]. His website is www.randallhansen.ca

UC International Migration Conference 2011

February 26 – Second Annual UC Migration Conference hosted by the Gifford Center

The Gifford Center and UCSD’s Center for Comparative Immigration Studies (CCIS) will host the Second Annual University of California Migration Conference on February 26, 2011 at UC Davis. This multi-disciplinary conference will provide an opportunity for University of California faculty and advanced graduate students to share their current migration-related research. Click here for information about last year’s conference, held at UCSD. If you are a UC faculty member or advanced graduate student and are interested in attending, please contact Prof. David J. Kyle at djkyle@ucdavis.edu

View Full Agenda »

Jennifer Hochschild — Genomic Science, Ancestry, and Racial Construction: New Complexity in the American Racial Order

 

Genomic Science, Ancestry, and Racial Construction: New Complexity in the American Racial Order

Seminar to be held in ERC 115 at 2:00 pm.

Jennifer L. Hochschild is Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government at Harvard University, with a joint appointment in the Department of African and African American Studies and a lectureship in the Harvard Kennedy School. She taught at Princeton University before moving to Harvard in 2000. Hochschild recently co-edited (with John Mollenkopf) Bringing Outsiders In: Transatlantic Perspectives on Immigrant Political Incorporation (Cornell University Press, 2009), and recently co-authored (with Brenna Powell), “Racial Reorganization and the United States Census 1850-1930: Mulattoes, Half-Breeds, Mixed Parentage, Hindoos, and the Mexican Race” (Studies in American Political Development 2008). Current book projects include Transforming the American Racial Order: Immigration, Multiracialism, DNA, and Cohort Change (co-authored) and Facts in Politics: What Do Citizens Know and What Difference Does It Make? Hochschild was founding editor of Perspectives on Politics, vice-chair of the Board of Trustees of Russell Sage Foundation, and program co-chair for the annual convention of the American Political Science Association. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Patrick Simon — Beyond assimilation: The Second Generation in France

Beyond assimilation: The Second Generation in France

 

Seminar to be held in ERC 115 at 2:00 pm.
After being one of the most renowned “assimilationnist’s country” in the world, France has recently been engaged in quick changes in its framing of incorporation of “immigrants”. Indeed, not only the concepts and theories used to portray the processes behind the “remaking of the French mainstream” have dramatically changed but the categories of those targeted by these processes have also been renewed. Access of “new second generations” (i.e. those born from the waves of immigration of the 1950s and 1960s) to the job market and their visibility in social, political and cultural life have challenged the “French model of integration”.

This presentation will confront the normative model of integration, the so-called republican model, to the prospects of the second generation. I will argue that the salience of race and ethnicity for minority members in contemporary France is challenging the expectations of a convergence in norms, values and practices at the second generation. A specific attention will be given to the role played by religion (Islam) and political participation. Data come from a new survey Trajectories and Origins: a survey on population diversity in France, which is the largest survey ever done in France on immigrants and second generation. Promoted by INED and the French National Statistical Institute (INSEE), the survey gathered information via a long questionnaire administered in face-to-face interviews to 22 000 respondents from 5 specific sub-samples: Immigrants (8300), descendents of Immigrants (8200), Overseas French (700), descendents of Overseas French (700) and “mainstream population” (3900). The questionnaire covers wide-ranging areas of social experience (education, employment, housing, family formation, language, religion, transnational ties, political participation and citizenship…) and focuses on experiences of discrimination and identity. Findings on religion, political participation, employment, neighborhoods and discrimination will be presented to support the thesis of an ongoing process of racialization of the French society and the rise of ethnic and racial minorities.

Patrick Simon is Director of research at INED (Institut National d’Etudes Demographiques –National demographic institute) (F) and is fellow researcher at the Center of European Studies (CEE) at Sciences Po. He is currently Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation in NYC and Fullbright Fellow. Train as socio-demographer at EHESS (Doctoral degree circa 1994), he has studied social and ethnic segregation in French cities, antidiscrimination policies and the integration of ethnic minorities in European countries. He has participated to several European projects, such as URBEX (The spatial dimensions of Urban Social Exclusion and Integration) and EMILIE (A European Approach to Multicultural Citizenship. Legal Political and Educational Challenges). He is coordinating the RTN TIES funded by Marie Curie funds. He is chairing the scientific panel “Integration of immigrants” at the IUSSP (International Union for the Scientific Studies of Population) and has been appointed as a member of the Scientific Board of the Fundamental Rights Agency of the European Commission in Vienna.

Patrick Weil — Comparative Citizenship Laws: Recent Transformations

 

Seminar to be held in ERC 115 at 2:00 pm.

Abstract for Professor Weil’s talk coming soon!

Patrick Weil is a Visiting Professor of Law and Robina Foundation International Fellow at Yale Law School and a senior research fellow at the French National Research Center in the University of Paris, Pantheon-Sorbonne.  Professor Weil’s work focuses on comparative immigration, citizenship, and Church States law and policy.  His most recent publications are How to be French?  A Nationality in the Making since 1789, from Duke University Press, “Why the French Laïcité is Liberal, Cardozo Law Review, June 2009, Vol. 30, Number 6, 2699-2714 and (with Son-Thierry Ly), “The Anti-racist Origins of the American Immigration Quota System.” Social Research, Volume 77, Number 1 (Spring 2010) pp.45-79.

Dr. Weil has worked extensively with the French government including participation in a 2003 French Presidential Commission on secularism, established by Jacques Chirac, and preparation of a report on immigration and nationality policy reform for Prime Minister Lionel Jospin in 1997 which led to the implementation of new immigration laws adopted the following year.  Dr. Weil also holds an appointment as Professor at the Paris School of Economics.