CCIS researchers present to congressional staffers and the Congressional Research Service

A group of researchers from CCIS recently traveled to Washington, DC to present the results of research carried out as part of the Mexican Migration Field Research Program. In a presentation sponsored by the offices of Representative Zoe Lofgren (D-California) and Representative Candice Miller (R-Michigan), CCIS researchers presented research dealing with topics including the impact of border enforcement measures and laws at the sub-national level that deal with immigration matters on the behavior of Mexican immigrants in the United States. The presentation to congressional staffers was followed by a roundtable discussion with members of the Congressional Research Service (CRS). In a wide-ranging discussion, CCIS staffers briefed CRS employees about some of the latest research on immigration.

Ethnicity, Race, & Indigenous Peoples in Latin America & the Caribbean

On November 3-5, 2011, the University of California, San Diego will host the Second Conference on Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America and the Caribbean. The event is organized and sponsored by ERIP (LASA Section on Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples), CILAS-UCSD (Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies, University of California, San Diego), CLAS-SDSU (Center for Latin American Studies, San Diego State University), LACES (Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies, journal published by Taylor & Francis and housed at UCSD), Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies (University of California, San Diego), and CCIS (Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, University of California, San Diego).

As explained in the Call for Panels and Papers, the conference will cover topics related to all aspects of ethnicity, race relations, Indigenous peoples, Afro-descendants and other ethnic or racial groups in Latin America and the Caribbean. Participants will include a large number of professional scholars and graduate students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, as well as activists and practitioners from grassroots organizations and NGOs. The program will feature multiple thematic panels organized into parallel sessions, presentations by keynote speakers, and receptions and other events, beginning on Thursday November 3rd and continuing through Saturday November 5th.

The LASA Section on Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples (ERIP) and the journal Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies (LACES) have jointly established a Travel Grants fund to assist participants’ travel from Latin American and the Caribbean, on a competitive basis. They will also sponsor the ERIP-LACES Student Paper Award to recognize the best work submitted by graduate students at the conference.

The First ERIP conference, which took place in May 2008 at the University of California, San Diego, brought together more than 300 participants and attendees. Because of the high level of interest and the existence of space, time and budget constraints, we urge prospective participants to submit their Panel Proposal Forms and Individual Paper Proposal Forms as early as possible in order to improve their chances of securing a place in the program.  Early registration is also recommended to those interested in simply attending the conference.

ERIP Conference Organizing and Program Committee:
Shannon Speed, Chair ERIP
Leon Zamosc, Chief Editor LACES
David Mares, Director CILAS-UCSD
Ramona Perez, Director CLAS-SDSU

Jeffrey Lesser – Brazilian Journeys: Contemporary Immigration and Emigration

 

Seminar to be held on Monday, October 10th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

Brazil, like the United States, often defines itself as a “nation of immigrants.”  Yet immigration has implications far beyond the direct experiences of newcomers.  The idea of immigration, often so different than the concrete reality of arrival, allowed Brazil’s elites (made up of landowners, politicians, intellectuals, and industrialists) to see a future that was different and better than the present one.

More than five million immigrants flowed into Brazil between 1872 and 1972 and the majority originated in Europe, especially Italy. Yet Brazil stands out for the high numbers of non-Europeans who also entered, notably from Japan and the Middle East.   Today Brazil’s largest city, São Paulo, is one of the largest Italian, Japanese, and Lebanese cities in the world.

This paper will explore the relationship between immigration and national identity both as an historical phenomenon and as a contemporary one by providing an overview of immigration to Brazil and then focusing on the contemporary movement of Brazilians to Japan.

Jeffrey Lesser is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor and Chair of the History Department at Emory University.  His research focuses on issues of ethnicity and national identity.

Lesser received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from Brown University and his Ph.D. from New York University.  He is the author of A Discontented Diaspora: Japanese-Brazilians and the Meanings of Ethnic Militancy, 1960-1980 (Durham: Duke University Press, 2007), winner of the Roberto Reis Prize (Honorable Mention) from the Brazilian Studies Association; Negotiating National Identity: Minorities, Immigrants and the Struggle for Ethnicity in Brazil (Duke University Press, 1999), winner of the Best Book Prize from the Brazil Section of the Latin American Studies Association, and Welcoming the Undesirables: Brazil and the Jewish Question (University of California Press, 1994) which won the Best Book Prize from New England Council on Latin American Studies. 

Lesser is has edited a number of volumes including Rethinking Jewish-Latin Americans (University of New Mexico Press, 2008; with Raanan Rein) Searching for Home Abroad: Japanese – Brazilians and Transnationalism (Duke University Press, 2003) and Arab and Jewish Immigrants in Latin America: Images and Realities (London: Frank Cass, 1998; with Ignacio Klich).

The Politics of Naturalization in Europe, Asia, and North America

Introduction and Panel 1. Europe
 

Panel 2. North America
 

Panel 3. Asia
 

Conference Report »

UC San Diego. May 20, 2011.

The Weaver Conference Center.

How do liberal states make immigrants into nationals? For some observers, a postnational future beckons in which universal rights of personhood strip national identity of its relevance for claiming the rights of citizenship. According to others, transnational migrants can pick and choose their affiliations to multiple polities. For still others, differences between liberal states are becoming obsolete either because official multiculturalism renders the idea of national core cultures illegitimate or the universalistic qualities of liberalism strips states of their national distinction. Even among scholars of nationality and citizenship, the issue of making national difference is often elided by a focus on those features of nationality law that are converging across liberal states.

To what extent is there a convergence in naturalization policies among liberal states that receive large numbers of immigrants? What explains the variation or convergence?

The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego, will host a conference to assess these questions on Friday, May 20, 2011. Funding is provided by a UCSD International, Comparative, and Area Studies (IIACAS) and Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) International Collaborative Research grant.

In order to RSVP for the event, please contact Ana Minvielle at aminvielle@ucsd.edu.

View Full Agenda »


“The Politics of Naturalization in Europe, Asia, and North America”

May 20, 2011 at CCIS

SCHEDULE (Rooms subject to change):


9:30-10am

COFFEE AND WELCOME

David FitzGerald, UC San Diego


10am-Noon

PANEL 1: EUROPE

Maarten Vink, Universiteit Maastricht, on national variation in the EU

Sara Wallace Goodman, UC Irvine, on citizenship tests in the EU

Alberto Martín-Pérez, University of Barcelona

Discussant: Jon Fox, University of Bristol


Noon-1pm

LUNCH


1-2:30pm

PANEL 2: NORTH AMERICA

Hiroshi Motomura, UCLA, on the U.S. case

Catherine Dauvergne, University of British Columbia, on the Canadian case

Discussant: Irene Bloemraad, UC Berkeley


2:30-3pm

BREAK


3-4:30pm

PANEL 3: ASIA

Kamal Sadiq, UC Irvine

John Skrentny and Gary Lee, UC San Diego

Discussant: Mara Loveman, University of Wisconsin

Ruben J. Garcia – Labor’s Approach to Immigration: How Does Law Matter?

 

Labor’s Approach to Immigration: How Does Law Matter?

Seminar to be held in ERC 115 at 2:00 pm.
While many U.S. and Canadian unions historically marginalized immigrant workers, by the early 1990s, key unions achieved success organizing immigrant workers and adopted more progressive immigration policies. North America’s major labor federations also made significant changes. The Canadian Labour Congress created a National Anti-Racism Task Force in 1994 to address, among other issues, the links between racism and Canadian immigration policies. In 2000, the AFL-CIO reversed its previous support for legislation that contributed to the discrimination and intimidation of immigrants. Then in 2003, a coalition of major U.S. unions, NGOs and community groups organized the Immigrant Workers Freedom Ride to call attention to the rights of immigrants.

This paper argues that shifts in union immigration policies emerge not only out of demographic changes that generate the need to organize immigrant workers, but also reflect larger changes wrought by processes of economic integration. It also suggests that unions’ adoption of less draconian immigration policies provide new political arenas for transnational labor collaboration. A 1997 campaign conducted by the Teamsters, UFW, and Mexican labor activists to defend the rights of migrant farmworkers who had left their community in Mexico to work in the Washington apple industry provides one example. Another example is advocacy in favor of labor rights for undocumented workers by the AFL-CIO and affiliated unions in court cases. We believe these and other examples will show that transnational links and amicus advocacy led official federation policy on immigration reform. These examples show how social change occurs in large, diffuse organizations.

Ruben J. Garcia is Professor of Law at California Western School of Law in San Diego, where he has taught since 2003. He has held visiting appointments at the University of California, Davis School of Law and at the University of California, San Diego. Professor Garcia received an A.B. from Stanford University, a J.D. from UCLA School of Law, and an LL.M. from the University of Wisconsin Law School.  His research and teaching focus on the ways that race, gender, immigration and globalization impact the law of work. Professor Garcia’s scholarly work has appeared in a number of publications, including the University of Chicago Legal Forum, Hastings Law Journal, Florida State Law Review, Florida Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Labor and Employment Law, the First Amendment Law Review, and the Journal of Gender, Race and Justice. He is currently finishing a book for New York University Press, titled Marginal Workers: How Legal Fault Lines Divide Workers and Leave Them Without Protection (2011).

Immigration at the National and Local Level in Japan

May 6-7, 2011, Weaver Conference Center, UC San Diego

With support from CCIS and participation from co-director David FitzGerald, UC San Diego School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IR/PS) hosts a two-day conference featuring leading academics from Japan, Brazil, Australia, and the United States who will examine the impact of future economic growth and community relations in Japan and the United States.

Admission is free, but registration is required.  Click here to register.

For more information, visit the website or contact Lane Ogawa.


Friday, May 6, 2011

Welcome

9:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

Ulrike Schaede, UC San Diego and Kazuhisa Nishihara, Nagoya University

Introduction

9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Ulrike Schaede, UC San Diego and Lindsey Sasaki, New York University

Session 1 – What is Immigration and its Implication for Japan, the United States, and Europe?

10:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

- Yuri Okina, Japan Research Institute
“Japan’s challenge with economic growth and demographic situation”
- Teruyuki Komatsu, Nagoya Gakuin University
“Brief history of Japanese immigration abroad since Meiji period”
- Apichai Shipper, University of Southern California
“Japan’s immigration politics in comparative perspective”
- Tadamasa Murai, Nagoya City University
“Japan’s distinct immigration policy in comparison with the U.S.A. and EU”

Discussant
David Fitzgerald, UC San Diego and Nancy Gilson, UC San Diego

Session 2 – The Economic and Demographic Effects of Immigration in Japan and the United States

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

- Kyoji Fukao, Hitosubashi University
“The Economic Impact of Migration: Productivity Analysis for Japan and the US at the National and the Local Level”
- Junichi Goto, Keio University
“Aging, Migration, and Female Workers in Japan: The Impact on Future Economic Growth”

Discussant
Gordon Hanson, UC San Diego

Session 3 – The Education and Adaptation of Migrant Children in Japan and the United States

2:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

- June Gordon, UC Santa Cruz
“Transnational Migration: Identity and Schooling of Nikkei Youth.”
- Kaori Okano, La Trobe University
“Educating migrant children: multicultural policies and practices”
- Marcelo Suarez-Orosco, New York University
“LISA study of the Harvard Immigration Project”

Discussant
Christena Turner, UC San Diego and Eiko Ushida, UC San Diego

Saturday, May 7, 2011
Session 1 – The Discourse of Immigration Policy, Citizenship, Multiculturalism, and Nationalism at the National and Local Level

9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

- Masato Ninomiya, University of São Paulo
“Judicial Cooperation between Brazil and Japan concerning the presence of Brazilian workers in Japan”
- Hideki Tarumoto, Hokkaido University
“Transformation of citizenship institutions in the global migration era”
- Joseph Hankins, UC San Diego
“Multiculturalism in Japan”

Discussant
Megumi Naoi, UC San Diego

Session 2 – The Development of Community Building and Social Movements in Japan

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

- Kazuhisa Nishihara, Nagoya University
“Immigrants from Asia to Contemporary Japan: Focus on the case of Chinese agricultural trainees”
- Hwaji Shin, University of San Francisco
“Zainichi Koreans’ social movements and citizenship in Japan”

Discussant
Lindsey Sasaki, New York University

Session 3 – The Integration of Immigrant Workers in Japan

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

- Keiko Yamanaka, UC Berkeley
“The 2008-09 Economic Crisis, Massive Unemployment of Immigrant Workers, and Efforts to Assist Them in Central Japan”
- Hiroshi Yamaguchi, Nagoya University
“South Americans in Japanese Industrial Cities: Social Environment and the Model of Integration”

Discussant
Ulrike Schaede, UC San Diego

John Skrentny and Gary Lee to present at “The Nation and Citizen in Transformation” conference at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, May 6-7.

John Skrentny and Gary Lee will present their paper, “Nationhood and Multiculturalism in Industrialized East Asia,” at a conference on “The Nation and Citizen in Transformation: Making and Unmaking of Transnationalism in East Asia.”  The conference will take place on May 6-7 at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

For details, click here.

Amada Armenta — Policing Immigrants or Immigration? The Implementation of 287(g) in Nashville

 

Seminar to be held in ERC 115 at 2:00 pm.
Amada Armenta will discuss her research on the implementation of the 287(g) program in Nashville, Tennessee. In April 2007, the Davidson County Sheriff’s Office began implementing the 287(g) program, which allows trained Sheriff’s deputies to screen all foreign born arrestees for immigration status and process them for removal. This particular paper focuses on how (or if) the adoption of the 287(g) program in Davidson County, affects the daily practices of city police officers whose arrests subject immigrants to screening in the jail, but who do not have immigration enforcement authority. Based on ride-alongs and interviews with Nashville police officers, Armenta’s research examines how field-level officers decide whether to arrest immigrants on misdemeanor violations to state law. Her findings show how officer behavior motivated by formal and de facto police department policies, create the perception that police are targeting immigrants for enforcement.

Amada Armenta is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at UCLA and a Predoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at UC San Diego. Her research has been supported by various organizations including the National Science Foundation, the American Society of Criminology, the American Sociological Association, the Social Science Research Council, and the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies. She has presented professional papers at numerous national conferences, and has been published in International Migration Review, Qualitative Sociology, and Work and Occupations. Her current research focuses on the politics and implementation of the 287(g) program in Nashville, Tennessee.

CCIS at the Midwest Political Science Association meeting

CCIS Director John Skrentny will be presenting “Obama and Immigration Reform: A Tough Sell for a Grand Bargain” at the meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association in Chicago, March 31-April 3, 2011. CCIS Research Claire Adida will be presenting “Gender and Generosity: Problems in Islamic Integration into France” at the same meeting.

Information about the conference »