Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal – Migration-Trust Networks: Social Cohesion in Mexican U.S.-Bound Emigration

 

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, June 5th in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm

In this research, Professor Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal uses ethnographic longitudinal data collected in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico as well as the U.S. to introduce the concept of Migration-Trust Networks (MTN) from a transnational perspective. The concept contributes to the existing social capital theories of international migration by defining the particularities that characterize the social networks of migration in which a large number of migrants from Mexico to the U.S. lack legal documentation. She specifies membership requirements to participate in a MTN for those who migrate from rural and urban places of origin. Religion, paisanaje, bounded solidarity, and enforceable trust are among the social mechanisms that influence the behavior of network participants to act collectively, trust one another, and offer mutual support in the challenges of migration. Assisting fellow migrants is expected of MTN members, while reciprocating the assistance is not. Instead, a form of risk pooling occurs in which migrants “return” favors by helping future migrants. The social structure of a MTN and the dependency on relationships of trust among its members allow for collective efficacy to form and serve as a safe haven for those who lack legal documents. Social expectations and social monitoring are maintained in the transnational context using modern technology such as cell phones and the internet. Flores-Yeffal provides a theoretical and empirical proposition of how and why the Migration-Trust Networks are able to expand by absorbing new members in a process she calls “the MTN effect.” She also argues that micro and macro social forces function simultaneously in the transnational context in order to develop, expand and/or transplant Migration-Trust Networks.

Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. She received her B.A. in Social Science from University of California Irvine, her M.A. in Demography and Ph.D. in Sociology from University of Pennsylvania. Her primary research interests include social capital, segregation, and transnational ties among Latin-American immigrants in the U.S., the role of modern technology in spreading anti-immigrant sentiment in the U.S., as well as the upward mobility of Latinos in the United States. Her research has been supported through her affiliation with the Mexican Migration Project and the Latin-American Migration Project at Princeton University, by the Mellon Foundation, “Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología” (CONACYT), and by the Mexican American and U.S. Latino Research Center at Texas A&M University. Her first book, entitled Migration-Trust Networks: social cohesion in Mexican-U.S. bound emigration, is being published by Texas A&M University Press. She is also currently writing her second book on international migration from El Salvador.

 

Michael Hiscox – The IMPALA Database Project

 

Seminar to be held on Thursday, May 31st in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

Governments adopt a variety of approaches to regulating immigration, and make adjustments to these policies frequently. But currently there exist no comprehensive, cross-nationally comparable data on immigration laws and policies and how they have changed over time. This is a major problem for ongoing research on the determinants and impacts of immigration policies. The project is aimed at addressing this problem by compiling and analyzing comparable data on immigration laws and policies in 26 major recipient countries from 1960 until the present, with annual updates to follow.  The project is examining major categories of immigration law and policy, covering the acquisition of citizenship, economic migration, family reunification, asylum and refugee protection, students, and policies relating to undocumented migration and border control. It will also collect data on policies relating to the integration of immigrants into the host country, including government programs providing assistance and language training. Regulations are coded for each country annually to generate comparable measures along key dimensions, including indexes of the restrictiveness of each country’s laws and policies relating to acquisition of citizenship, economic migration, treatment of asylum seekers and refugees, and border control, and measures of the extent to which regulations favor particular categories of immigrants based upon occupational skills, education, ethnicity, and gender.

Michael J. Hiscox is the Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs in the Department of Government in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. He is also a faculty associate at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the Harvard University Center for the Environment, and co-leader of the Harvard-MIT Private Governance Research Group. His research focuses on international trade, foreign investment, immigration, development, government accountability, and private sector initiatives and standards for addressing social and environmental issues in global supply chains.


Robbie Totten – Security and United States Immigration Policy

 

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, May 8th in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

What is the relationship between security and immigration to the U.S? How have security objectives factored into U.S. immigration policy? These questions are significant for the U.S. because the volume of international migration has been increasing in recent decades and many analysts argue that without sound policy planning immigration can for America serve as a source of conflict with foreign states, tax the ability of its domestic systems to assimilate diverse peoples without violence, and expose its citizens and immigrants to crime, contagious disease, and terrorism. This talk will address these questions and present the strategic logic for U.S. immigration policy by identifying three general categories of security objectives that American officials have attempted to reach with immigration from the colonial era to the present-day: (1) foreign relations, (2) material and military interests, and (3) domestic security (prevent crime, espionage, and terrorism; epidemics; and ethnic violence). The discussions of the categories will draw from International Relations (IR) and Security Studies theories, primary sources, and works by demographers and historians to specify the relationships amongst the security areas and immigration, identify policy instruments used by leaders to influence immigration for security, and present historical cases of U.S. immigration policies designed for security purposes. The talk will conclude with discussing its implications for immigration research and contemporary policy.

Robbie Totten is a doctoral candidate in the UCLA Department of Political Science and the pre-doctoral fellow here at the CCIS. He received his BA in Political Science from Duke University and he has published articles in the Journal of Interdisciplinary History and Diplomatic History. Totten’s dissertation is titled, “Security and United States Immigration Policy,” and his research interests include, demography and security, foreign relations and state migration policies, nontraditional security threats, geopolitics and international migration, refugee crises, and U.S. immigration policy history.


The 28th Meeting of the Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC)

The 28th Meeting of the Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC)

Friday, May 4th, 12:00 – 7:30pm

The Village at Torrey Pines, 15th Floor

Co-sponsored by: The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, Department of Political Science

________________________________________

MEETING AGENDA

12:00-12:15pm LUNCH AND INTRODUCTION

12:15-2:45pm PANEL 1

Allison Anoll, Stanford University, Dissipating Cuban Distinctiveness: A Study of the Increasing Homogeneity of Latino Political Participation Among Post-1980 Immigrant and U.S. Born Cubans

Zoltan Hajnal and Michael Rivera, UCSD, Attitudes Toward Latinos and the White Vote

Chris Haynes, University of California Riverside, Calling All Empathizers: How Empathy Moderates the Effect of Empathic Capacity on Immigration Policy Preferences

Brad Jones, UC Davis, Anchor Babies and Aliens: What’s in a Name?

Neil Visalvanich, UCSD, An Experimental Manipulation: Candidate Race, Information, and Vote Choice

2:45-3:00pm COFFEE BREAK

3:00-5:15pm PANEL 2

Melissa Michelson, Cal State University – East Bay, Nativity and Mobilization: Field Experiments in Immigrant Voter Mobilization

Sergio Garcia-Rios, University of Washington, From Defined to Refined: A Theory of Identity Formation among Latinos/as

Joel Fetzer and Michael Weisshar, Pepperdine University, Generic Prejudice and Public Attitudes toward Immigration in Argentina

Kristina Victor, UC Davis, The Ties that Bind: Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Ethnic Cues

Jane Lilly, UCSD Sociology, Identity and Protest: How the 2006 Immigration Protests Shaped Identity Among Latinos Living in the United States

Soomi Lee, University of La Verne, Racial Hetereogeneity and Medicaid Expenditure in the U.S. States: A Longitudinal Analysis

5:30-7:30pm RECEPTION

These events are open to all members of the UCSD community, as well as faculty and students from other universities and the general public. For further information, please contact Ana Minvielle at aminvielle@ucsd.edu or 858-822-4447.

Book Panel Discussion with Zoltan Hajnal, Paul Frymer and Michael Rivera

 

Discussion to be held on Friday, April 20th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

“Why Americans Don’t Join the Party” explores why so many Americans–in particular, Latinos and Asians–fail to develop ties to either major party, why African Americans feel locked into a particular party, and why some white Americans are shut out by ideologically polarized party competition. Through extensive analysis, the authors demonstrate that when the Democratic and Republican parties fail to raise political awareness, to engage deeply held political convictions, or to affirm primary group attachments, nonpartisanship becomes a rationally adaptive response. By developing a model of partisanship that explicitly considers America’s new racial diversity and evolving nonpartisanship, this book provides the Democratic and Republican parties and other political stakeholders with the means and motivation to more fully engage the diverse range of Americans who remain outside the partisan fray.

Zoltan Hajnal is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.  A scholar of racial and ethnic politics, urban politics, immigration, and political behavior, Dr. Hajnal is the author of Why Americans Don’t Join the Party: Race, Immigration, and the Failure of Political Parties to Engage the Electorate (Princeton 2011), America’s Uneven Democracy: Race, Turnout, and Representation in City Politics (Cambridge 2010) and Changing White Attitudes toward Black Political Leadership (Cambridge 2006) and has published in the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, and numerous other journals, edited volumes, and newspaper editorial pages. Before joining the faculty at UCSD, Dr. Hajnal was a research fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California and a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Brandeis University.  He has received numerous honors for his research and writing including the Best Book and Best Paper in Urban Politics Awards from the American Political Science Association.

Paul Frymer is Associate Professor of Politics at Princeton University.  He writes and teaches on topics in American politics, institutions, law, state theory, and American political development, particularly as they intersect with issues of democratic representation, race and civil rights, and labor and employment rights. In 2010, his book, Uneasy Alliances: Race and Party Competition was re-issued by Princeton University Press with an afterward on the significance of the Obama election. In 2008, Frymer published Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party, also with Princeton University Press.

Michael Rivera is a current graduate student in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.  Before moving to San Diego, he studied at the University of California, Davis where he received a B.A. in Political Science and Spanish. His current research interests include state immigration policy, American voter behavior and race/ethnic politics.

The Politics of Race and Place Workshop

Keynote Speaker and Session 1: Local Context and Its Impact on Political behavior and Attitudes
 

Session 2: Policy Implications of Demographic Change
 

February 24, 2012

12:00-5:30pm

UCSD, The Weaver Center, Institute of Americas

12:00-12:10 Welcome and Introduction, Marisa Abrajano (UCSD) and R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

12:15-1:15 Lunch and Keynote Speaker, Michael J. Aguirre (Former San Diego City Attorney), “Putting Research Into Action”

Moderator: Steve Erie, UCSD

1:15-3:15 Session 1: Local Context and Its Impact on Political Behavior and Attitudes

1. Marisa Abrajano (UCSD) and R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

2. Zoltan Hajnal (UCSD), “Multi-Ethnic Context and Minority Policy Attitudes”

Discussant: Ron Schmidt (CSULB)

3. Janelle Wong (USC), “Immigration, Religion and Conservative Politics in Houston and L.A.”

Discussant: Mark Sawyer (UCLA)

4. Pei-te Lien (UCSB), ” Race, Place, Gender, and Minority Representation in Local Elective Offices”

Discussant: Leland Saito (USC)

3:15-3:30 Coffee Break

3:30-5:00 Session 2: Policy Implications of Demographic Change

5. Justin Levitt (Loyola Law School), Municipal Redistricting Outside the Box

Discussant: Thad Kousser (UCSD)

6. Lisa Garcia Bedolla (Cal), “Ethnorace and Place: Political Socialization among Immigrant Youth in Orange County”

Discussant: R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

7. Jane Junn (USC) and Vladimir Medenica (USC), “Attitudes on Immigration Policy in California: Party Identification and Local Context”

Discussant: Roderick Kiewiet (Cal Tech)

5:00-5:30   Closing Remarks

Research Seminar with Patrick Ettinger & Kelly Lytle Hernandez

 

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, February 21st in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

“`Something there is that doesn’t love a wall’:  Late Nineteenth-Century Border Crossings and the Imperatives of American Border Control”

Federal laws restricting the entry of certain migrants into the United States, initially imposed in the late nineteenth century, unsurprisingly occasioned the first efforts to evade those restrictions.  Among other responses, smugglers and immigrants from around the globe began to make use of routes into the United States that crossed the Canadian and Mexican borders.  American officials responded by attempting to institute border-crossing regulations and border guards.  This, of course, meant determining what exactly an effective border would look like.  This talk considers the visions of proper border enforcement that developed among American immigration officials, policy makers, and the media in the decades before the creation of the U.S. Border Patrol in 1924.

Dr. Patrick Ettinger grew up in southern California and studied in the Great Books Program at the University of Notre Dame, graduating with a B.A. in 1986.  He earned his PhD in History from Indiana University in 2000, where his dissertation research focused on undocumented immigration and early border enforcement efforts on the Canadian and Mexican borders at the turn of the 20th century.  He has given various professional papers and published excerpts from his research in the Western Historical Quarterly. His book, Imaginary Lines:  Border Enforcement and the Origins of Undocumented Immigration, was published by the University of Texas Press in 2009 and named a finalist for the William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America.  Currently, he is Professor of History at Sacramento State University, where he regularly teaches courses in American immigration history, the history of the American West, and oral history.  He also serves as the director of his department’s Public History Master’s Program.

“Migra! A History of the US Border Patrol”

Migra! chronicles the untold history of the United States Border Patrol from its beginnings in 1924 as a small peripheral outfit to its emergence as a large professional police force. It is based upon a gold mine of lost and unseen records stored in garages, closets, an abandoned factory, and in U.S. and Mexican archives. Focusing on the daily challenges of policing the borderlands and bringing to light unexpected partners and forgotten dynamics, Migra! reveals how the U.S. Border Patrol translated the mandate for

Kelly Lytle Hernandez is associate professor in the UCLA Department of History and Associate Co-Director of the National Center for History in the Schools. Her research interests are in twentieth-century U.S. history with a concentration upon race, migration, and police and prison systems in the American West and U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Her new book, MIGRA! A History of the U.S. Border Patrol (University of California Press, 2010) is the first book to tell the story of how and why the U.S. Border Patrol concentrates its resources upon policing unsanctioned Mexican immigration despite the many possible targets and strategies of U.S. migration control. Her current research focuses upon exploring the social world of incarceration in Los Angeles between 1876 and 1965.

* Light refreshments will be provided