UC-wide Immigration Conference 2013

“We asked for workers and families came:” Children, youth and families in migration

Friday, February 22, 2013
9am to 8pm (including dinner and cultural event)
University of California, Los Angeles
(385 Charles E. Young Drive, 1242 Law Building, Los Angeles, California 90095)

This conference draws together UC-wide faculty and students who study children, youth and families in relation to migration issues, broadly defined. Collectively, we want to address such questions as: How do migration experiences shape the experiences of growing up and raising children? How do current immigration policies affect families? How are the children of immigrants faring in educational contexts? What identities are they forming? What are their daily lives and experiences, and aspirations for the future? What policies and practices best support the health and welfare of immigrant children, youth and families? How does the recognition of children’s claims to educational access and to various forms of lawful status (ranging from Deferred Action to U.S. citizenship), based on their ties or their birth in the United States, both reflect and affect fundamental notions of citizenship and belonging?

To RSVP, click here.

For more information, click here or contact Peter Catron at pcatron@ucla.edu.

* Jointly sponsored with UCLA


SCHEDULE (Rooms subject to change):

8:30-9:00 a.m. BREAKFAST AND REGISTRATION

Held in the hallway outside of Room 1347.

9:00-9:15 a.m. WELCOME

ROOM  1347.

Remarks by Marcelo Suarez-Orozco.

9:15-10:45 a.m.  PLENARY SESSION: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN IMMIGRATION LAW

ROOM  1347.

10:45-11:00 a.m. BREAK

Refreshments provided outside of Room 1347.

11:00-12:30 p.m. PLENARY SESSION: YOUTH, FAMILY, AND IMMIGRANT HEALTH

ROOM 1347.

12:30-1:30 p.m. LUNCH

Boxed lunches are located outside of Room 1347.

1:30-2:30 p.m. POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Poster presentations are located in the hallway outside of Room 1347.

2:30-3:45 p.m. BREAKOUT PANELS, SESSION A

ROOM 1347: IMMIGRANT PARENTS AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY

ROOM 1457: IMMIGRANT RIGHTS AND PUBLIC OPINION

ROOM 1420: HOUSEHOLD AND COMMUNITY DYNAMIC

ROOM 1430: MOBILIZATION AND EXPERIENCE OF BEING UNDOCUMENTED

3:45-4:00 p.m. BREAK

4:00-5:15 p.m. BREAKOUT PANELS, SESSION B

ROOM 1347: GENERATIONAL PATHWAYS

ROOM 1457: IDENTITY AND BELONGING

ROOM 1420: TRANSNATIONALISM AND FAMILIES

ROOM 1430: UNDOCUMENTED TENSIONS

ROOM 1347: EDUCATION OF LATINO IMMIGRANTS

6:00-8:30 p.m. Dinner (with keynote speaker and cultural event) 

Veronica Terriquez – The Political Socialization of Youth from Immigrant Families and the Role of Community-Based Organizations

Thursday, January 31
12:30pm-2:00pm
Social Sciences Building 101

Veronica Terriquez (USC) will present, “The Political Socialization of Youth from Immigrant Families and the Role of Community-Based Organizations”.

Abstract: Advancing the literature on immigrant incorporation, youth civic engagement, and voluntary associations, this mixed-methods study examines the political socialization of youth from immigrant families. I contend that the barriers to immigrant parents’ political engagement limit their children’s political participation, unless children gain significant political exposure from community-based organizations (CBOs) or other non-family sources. Drawing on survey data from a representative sample of California’s youth population, my analysis demonstrate strong support for the top-down model of political socialization in which political behaviors, or lack thereof, are transmitted from immigrant parents to their U.S.-raised children. However, this is not the case for my unique survey sample of youth who participated in politically oriented CBOs. My analysis of follow-up in depth interviews with survey respondents indicates that while most youth do not seek to politicize their immigrant parents, CBO youth members actively orient their immigrant parents to U.S. politics. In describing the efforts of CBO youth members to educate their foreign-born parents about politics and encourage their participation, I demonstrate trickle-up effects in the political socialization of immigrant families. I argue that future research on politically oriented civic associations should consider the impact of individual-level organizational membership on family-level patterns of political engagement.

*Jointly sponsored with UCSD Department of Sociology

Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar – The Political Economies of Immigration Law

[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Mariano-Cuellar.mp3[/podcast]

Seminar to be held on Monday, January 28th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

A largely dysfunctional American immigration system is only poorly explained by simple depictions of the political economy of lawmaking in this area, blaming functional economic policy-setting, longstanding public attitudes, explicit presidential discretion, or general gridlock. Instead, the structure of immigration law emerges from intersecting effects of three separate political economies – statutory compromises rooted in the political economy of lawmaking, organizational practices reflecting the political economy of implementation, and public reactions implicating the responses of policy elites and the larger public to each other. Together, these factors help constitute an immigration status quo of continuing legal controversies as well as powerful obstacles to change: (1) Particularly since 1986, American immigration statutes have created a legal arrangement essentially built to fail, giving authorities regulatory responsibilities that were all but impossible to achieve under existing law. (2) Implementation has been characterized by organizational fragmentation, with policy changes involving one agency producing externalities not owned by that agency, alongside limited presidential power to change enforcement or implementation. At the same time, (3) the interplay of unrealistic statutory goals, enforcement patterns, and public attitudes engenders a polarizing implementation dynamic, where agencies’ incapacity to enforce existing law tends to spur polarized responses producing legislation that exacerbates agency difficulties in meeting public expectations, without giving interested parties enough of a reason to support an alternative.

The resulting cycle favors expansion in the provision of border enforcement resources, a development supported or at least tolerated by most political actors yet failing to address the core institutional dysfunction in the system, while locking in most other features of the status quo. Beyond what these developments tell us about immigration law, they also reveal much about (a) how statutory entrenchment in the United States is affected by political cycles capable of eroding the legitimacy of public agencies, and (b) how powerful nation-states control, in limited but nonetheless significant ways, the transnational flows affecting their well-being and security.

Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar works at the intersection of law, public policy, and political science.  A member of the Stanford Law School faculty since 2001, he is currently Professor and Deane F. Johnson Faculty Scholar at Stanford Law School, Professor (by courtesy) of Political Science, and the Co-Director of Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation.  His research and teaching focus on administrative law, executive power, and how organizations implement regulatory responsibilities involving public health and safety, migration, and international security in a changing world.  In July 2010, the President appointed him to the Council of the Administrative Conference of the United States, an independent agency charged with improving the efficiency and fairness of federal regulatory programs.  He also serves on the Department of Education’s National Commission on Educational Equity and Excellence, and the Department of State’s Advisory Sub-Committee on Economic Sanctions.

From early 2009 through the summer of 2010, he served as Special Assistant to the President for Justice and Regulatory Policy at the White House.  In this capacity, he led the Domestic Policy Council’s work on criminal justice and drug policy, public health and food safety, regulatory reform, borders and immigration, civil rights, and rural and agricultural policy.  Among other issues, Cuéllar worked on stricter food safety standards, the FDA’s regulatory science initiative, expanding support for local law enforcement and community-based crime prevention, strengthening border coordination and immigrant integration, and the Quadrennial Homeland Security Review.  Before working at the White House, he co-chaired the Obama-Biden Transition’s Immigration Policy Working Group.  During the second term of the Clinton Administration, he worked at the U.S. Department of the Treasury as Senior Advisor to the Under Secretary for Enforcement, where he focused on countering financial crime, improving border coordination, and enhancing anti-corruption measures.  He is on the Board of Directors of the Constitution Project, a non-profit think-tank that builds bipartisan consensus on significant constitutional issues.  He clerked for Chief Judge Mary M. Schroeder of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Chris Haynes – Empathy & Immigration Policy Preferences: The Interactive Pathway for Permissive Change

[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Research-Seminar_Chris-Haynes.mp3[/podcast]

Seminar to be held on Monday, November 26th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm

Social psychology research has shown that priming both emotion-giving and perspective-taking empathy can increase positive attitudes towards other groups.  Yet, political scientists have yet to explore the attitudinal implications of this emotional construct in a political context.  However, in a previous pilot study of students,  Chris Haynes finds evidence that empathy can have a permissive effect on people’s immigration policy preferences.  Here, he builds on these insights by presenting the results of two experiments, one laboratory and one online M-Turk, which evaluate the following expectations:  First, he argues that while empathy is multidimensional, empathic effects on immigration policy preferences depend largely on the presence of both emotion-giving and perspective-taking empathy.  Second,  he asserts that these effects will be moderated by the permissive effects of dispositional empathy.    In the first laboratory study of temp agency supplied participants from California, he finds that dispositional empathy moderates permissive change as expected.   In the second national M-Turk study, he finds support for his interactive understanding of empathy in addition to dispositional empathy as a moderator.  He then discusses the implications of these findings.

Chris Haynes is a PhD candidate in Political Science from the University of California, Riverside and CCIS Pre-Doctoral Fellow.  His NSF-funded dissertation examines the effects of empathy in the context of immigration policy preferences.  More broadly, his research includes a book manuscript on the framing effects on public opinion on immigration, working papers on Asian-American co-ethnic linked fate, the implications of ethnic media consumption on the political knowledge of Latinos, Asian-Americans, and African-Americans, and work with the second iteration of the National Asian American Survey.

 

Post-Election Roundtable Discussion: Ethnic Politics and the Politics of Immigration Reform

[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Post-Election_Discussion.mp3[/podcast]

Tuesday, November 13th in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm

A Roundtable Discussion on the 2012 Presidential Elections: Ethnic Politics and the Politics of  Immigration Reform

Panelists
1. Marisa Abrajano, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, UCSD

2. Efren Perez, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Vanderbilt University

3. Tom Wong, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, UCSD

Book Discussion with Stephanie Limoncelli

[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Stephanie_Limoncelli.mp3[/podcast]

Book discussion to be held on Monday, October 22nd in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm

The Politics of Trafficking: The First International Movement to Combat the Sexual Exploitation of Women

Sex trafficking is not a recent phenomenon. Over 100 years ago, the first international traffic in women for prostitution emerged, prompting a worldwide effort to combat it. The Politics of Trafficking provides a unique look at the history of that first anti-trafficking movement, illuminating the role gender, sexuality, and national interests play in international politics.

Initially conceived as a global humanitarian effort to protect women from sexual exploitation, the movement’s feminist-inspired vision failed to achieve its universal goal and gradually gave way to nationalist concerns over “undesirable” migrants and state control over women themselves. Addressing an issue that is still of great concern today, this book sheds light on the ability of international non-governmental organizations to challenge state power, the motivations for state involvement in humanitarian issues pertaining to women, and the importance of gender and sexuality to state officials engaged in nation building.

Stephanie A. Limoncelli is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Loyola Marymount University and a former Research Associate at the International Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal – Migration-Trust Networks: Social Cohesion in Mexican U.S.-Bound Emigration

[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/DW_C00701.mp3[/podcast]

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, June 5th in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm

In this research, Professor Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal uses ethnographic longitudinal data collected in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico as well as the U.S. to introduce the concept of Migration-Trust Networks (MTN) from a transnational perspective. The concept contributes to the existing social capital theories of international migration by defining the particularities that characterize the social networks of migration in which a large number of migrants from Mexico to the U.S. lack legal documentation. She specifies membership requirements to participate in a MTN for those who migrate from rural and urban places of origin. Religion, paisanaje, bounded solidarity, and enforceable trust are among the social mechanisms that influence the behavior of network participants to act collectively, trust one another, and offer mutual support in the challenges of migration. Assisting fellow migrants is expected of MTN members, while reciprocating the assistance is not. Instead, a form of risk pooling occurs in which migrants “return” favors by helping future migrants. The social structure of a MTN and the dependency on relationships of trust among its members allow for collective efficacy to form and serve as a safe haven for those who lack legal documents. Social expectations and social monitoring are maintained in the transnational context using modern technology such as cell phones and the internet. Flores-Yeffal provides a theoretical and empirical proposition of how and why the Migration-Trust Networks are able to expand by absorbing new members in a process she calls “the MTN effect.” She also argues that micro and macro social forces function simultaneously in the transnational context in order to develop, expand and/or transplant Migration-Trust Networks.

Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. She received her B.A. in Social Science from University of California Irvine, her M.A. in Demography and Ph.D. in Sociology from University of Pennsylvania. Her primary research interests include social capital, segregation, and transnational ties among Latin-American immigrants in the U.S., the role of modern technology in spreading anti-immigrant sentiment in the U.S., as well as the upward mobility of Latinos in the United States. Her research has been supported through her affiliation with the Mexican Migration Project and the Latin-American Migration Project at Princeton University, by the Mellon Foundation, “Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología” (CONACYT), and by the Mexican American and U.S. Latino Research Center at Texas A&M University. Her first book, entitled Migration-Trust Networks: social cohesion in Mexican-U.S. bound emigration, is being published by Texas A&M University Press. She is also currently writing her second book on international migration from El Salvador.

 

Michael Hiscox – The IMPALA Database Project

[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Michael-Hiscox1.mp3[/podcast]

Seminar to be held on Thursday, May 31st in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

Governments adopt a variety of approaches to regulating immigration, and make adjustments to these policies frequently. But currently there exist no comprehensive, cross-nationally comparable data on immigration laws and policies and how they have changed over time. This is a major problem for ongoing research on the determinants and impacts of immigration policies. The project is aimed at addressing this problem by compiling and analyzing comparable data on immigration laws and policies in 26 major recipient countries from 1960 until the present, with annual updates to follow.  The project is examining major categories of immigration law and policy, covering the acquisition of citizenship, economic migration, family reunification, asylum and refugee protection, students, and policies relating to undocumented migration and border control. It will also collect data on policies relating to the integration of immigrants into the host country, including government programs providing assistance and language training. Regulations are coded for each country annually to generate comparable measures along key dimensions, including indexes of the restrictiveness of each country’s laws and policies relating to acquisition of citizenship, economic migration, treatment of asylum seekers and refugees, and border control, and measures of the extent to which regulations favor particular categories of immigrants based upon occupational skills, education, ethnicity, and gender.

Michael J. Hiscox is the Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs in the Department of Government in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. He is also a faculty associate at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the Harvard University Center for the Environment, and co-leader of the Harvard-MIT Private Governance Research Group. His research focuses on international trade, foreign investment, immigration, development, government accountability, and private sector initiatives and standards for addressing social and environmental issues in global supply chains.


Robbie Totten – Security and United States Immigration Policy

[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Robbie_Totten.mp3[/podcast]

Seminar to be held on Tuesday, May 8th in ERC 115 at 12:30 pm.

What is the relationship between security and immigration to the U.S? How have security objectives factored into U.S. immigration policy? These questions are significant for the U.S. because the volume of international migration has been increasing in recent decades and many analysts argue that without sound policy planning immigration can for America serve as a source of conflict with foreign states, tax the ability of its domestic systems to assimilate diverse peoples without violence, and expose its citizens and immigrants to crime, contagious disease, and terrorism. This talk will address these questions and present the strategic logic for U.S. immigration policy by identifying three general categories of security objectives that American officials have attempted to reach with immigration from the colonial era to the present-day: (1) foreign relations, (2) material and military interests, and (3) domestic security (prevent crime, espionage, and terrorism; epidemics; and ethnic violence). The discussions of the categories will draw from International Relations (IR) and Security Studies theories, primary sources, and works by demographers and historians to specify the relationships amongst the security areas and immigration, identify policy instruments used by leaders to influence immigration for security, and present historical cases of U.S. immigration policies designed for security purposes. The talk will conclude with discussing its implications for immigration research and contemporary policy.

Robbie Totten is a doctoral candidate in the UCLA Department of Political Science and the pre-doctoral fellow here at the CCIS. He received his BA in Political Science from Duke University and he has published articles in the Journal of Interdisciplinary History and Diplomatic History. Totten’s dissertation is titled, “Security and United States Immigration Policy,” and his research interests include, demography and security, foreign relations and state migration policies, nontraditional security threats, geopolitics and international migration, refugee crises, and U.S. immigration policy history.