Is Immigration Necessary? Work, Growth, and the Future in the US and Japan

Introduction and Panel 1. What role do low-­skilled migrants play in the Japanese and American labor markets?
 

Panel 2. What role do high-­skilled migrants play in the Japanese and American labor markets?
 

Panel 3. Similarities, Differences, & comparative perspectives on low-­ & high-­skilled migration
 

Panel 4. Alternatives to migration? Education, mechanization, wages, the role of women
 

Panel 5. The Politics of migration in Japan, Asia and the US
 

Panel 6. The US and Japan’s Immigration Dilemmas in Comparative Perspective
 

UC San Diego.  The Weaver Center. September 10th & 11th, 2010. 10:00am-5:00pm
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This event is sponsored by the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies and the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership with generous support from the Center for Research on Immigration, Population, and Public Policy at UC Irvine;  the Institute for International, Comparative, and Area Studies at UC San Diego; and the Center for Pacific Economies at the school of International and Pacific Studies at UC San Diego.

Papers and presentations from the COEMH Research Training Workshop, May 13-14, 2010

First Annual Research Training Workshop
May 13-14, 2010, UC San Diego

The COEMH’s first annual, interdisciplinary Research Training Workshop served as a showcase for research being undertaken by graduate students and recent postdoctoral scholars throughout the UC system relating to migration and health. UC faculty members served as discussants, providing expert feedback on the students’ work and commenting on its relevance to their own research. All ten UC campuses and eight academic disciplines were represented among the presenters and discussants. A selection of papers presented at the workshop will be published electronically as COEMH Working Papers and edited for publication as a special issue of a peer-reviewed journal. A prize for the best paper will also be awarded.

Workshop Organizing Committee: Wayne Cornelius (UCSD), Coordinator; Frank Bean (UCI), Claire Brindis (UCSF), Robin DeLugan (UC Merced)

Papers Presented

Session 1: Child Health and Family Dynamics

Luz Becerra (UCD) — Presentation | Paper

Naomi Schapiro (UCSF) — Presentation | Paper

Rosa Maria Sternberg (UCSF) — Presentation | Paper

Kristin Yarris (UCLA) — Presentation | Paper

Session 2: Immigrant Incorporation and Generational Well-being

Rennie Lee (UCLA) — Presentation | Paper

Carolyn Zambrano (UCI) — Presentation | Paper

Georgiana Bostean (UCI) — Presentation | Paper

Ayman Tailakh (UCLA) — Presentation | Paper

Keynote Address

Jay Silverman (Harvard School of Public Health), “Sex Trafficking: A Dark and Neglected Corner of Gender-­based Violence and HIV Risk” — Presentation

Session 3: Occupational and Environmental Health

Chelsea Eastman (UCD) — Presentation | Paper

Shira Goldenberg (UCSD) — Presentation | Paper

Angela Robertson (UCSD)

Barbara Baquero (UCSD) — Paper

Keynote

Sylvia Guendelman (UCB), “Birth Outcomes of Mexican immigrant Mothers: Advantages in the Midst of inequalities?” — Presentation

Session 4: Women’s and Reproductive Health

Gloria Giraldo (UCLA) — Presentation | Paper

Alexandra Minnis (UCB) — Presentation | Paper

Maryada Vallet (UCLA) — Presentation | Paper

Katie Kessler, Liliana Quezada & Shira Goldenberg (UCSD) — Presentation | Paper

Faculty Discussant: Claire Brindis (UCSF) — Presentation

Session 5: Health Care and Immigration Policy

Cassie Hartzog (UCD) — Presentation | Paper

Helen Marrow (UCB) — Presentation | Paper

Rebecca Hester (UCSC/UI) — Presentation | Paper

Jennifer Miller-­‐Thayer (UCR) — Presentation | Paper

Center of Expertise on Migration and Health — First Annual Research Training Workshop

Download PDF of conference agenda »

May 13-14, 2010, Weaver Conference Center, UC San Diego

The UC Center of Expertise on Migration and Health (COEMH), Is a component of the UC-wide Global Health Institute). The COEMH is a ten-campus, interdisciplinary program whose mission is to improve health and eliminate health disparities of international migrants, refugees, and internally displaced people around the world (see http://www.ucghi.universityofcalifornia.edu/coes/migration-and-health/index.aspx for further information).

The COEMH’s first annual, interdisciplinary Research Training Workshop will serve as a showcase for research being undertaken by graduate students and recent postdoctoral scholars throughout the UC system relating to migration and health. UC faculty members will serve as discussants, providing expert feedback on the students’ work and commenting on its relevance to their own research. Additional mentoring will be provided through one-on-one meetings between participating students and faculty members.

A selection of papers presented at the workshop will be published electronically as COEMH Working Papers and edited for publication as a special issue of a peer- ‐reviewed journal. A prize for the best paper will also be awarded.

Workshop Organizing Committee: Wayne Cornelius (UCSD), Coordinator; Frank Bean (UCI), Claire Brindis (UCSF), Robin DeLugan (UC Merced)

Agenda and Participants

Thursday, May 13

8:30 am
Welcome and Introductions

8:35 am
Session 1: Child Health and Family Dynamics

Luz Becerra (UCD)

Naomi Schapiro (UCSF)

Rosa Maria Sternberg (UCSF)

Kristin Yarris (UCLA)

Faculty Discussant: Sylvia Guendelman (UCB)

10:15 am
Coffee break

10:30 am
Session 2: Immigrant Incorporation and Generational Well-being

Rennie Lee (UCLA)

Carolyn Zambrano (UCIGeorgiana Bostean (UCI)

Ayman Tailakh (UCLA)

Faculty Discussant: Frank Bean (UCI)

12:15 pm
Lunch and Keynote Address

Jay Silverman (Harvard School of Public Health), “Sex Trafficking: A Dark and Neglected Corner of Gender-based Violence and HIV Risk”

1:45 pm
Session 3: Occupational and Environmental Health

Chelsea Eastman (UCD)

Shira Goldenberg (UCSD)

Angela Robertson (UCSD)

Barbara Baquero (UCSD)

Faculty Discussant: Marc Schenker (UCD)

5:30 pm
Dinner and Keynote Address

Sylvia Guendelman (UCB),

“Birth Outcomes of Mexican immigrant Mothers: Advantages in the Midst of inequalities?”

Friday, May 14

8:45 am
Session 4: Women’s and Reproductive Health

Gloria Giraldo (UCLA)

Alexandra Minnis (UCB)

Maryada Vallet (UCLA)

Liliana Quezada & Katie Kessler (UCSD)

Faculty Discussant: Claire Brindis (UCSF)

10:30 am
Coffee break

10:45 am
Session 5: Health Care and Immigration Policy

Cassie Herzog (UCD)

Helen Marrow (UCB)

Rebecca Hester (UCSC/UI)

Jennifer Miller-Thayer (UCR)

Faculty Discussants: Wayne Cornelius (UCSD), Steffanie Strathdee (UCSD)

12:15 pm
Lunch and adjournment

1:00-3:00 pm
Meeting of COEMH Steering Committee


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Population, Integration and Law: Implications for Immigration Policy

Population, Integration and Law: Implications for Immigration Policy

Monday-Tuesday, March 29-30, 2010

Catamaran Resort, San Diego, California

With the support of the German Marshall Fund TEAMS, UCB European Union Center of Excellence, UCSD Center for Comparative Immigration Studies

The purpose of this seminar is to explore the implications of population, economics, and integration impacts on immigration policies in the US and EU.

Monday, March 29, 2010

8:30am Welcome and Introductions

Philip Martin and Kay Hailbronner

8:45 Recent immigration patterns and their implications for policy

Jeff Passel, Pew Hispanic Center and David Coleman, Oxford

Comments: Michael Teitelbaum

10:30 Economic Impacts of Migration

Giovanni Peri, UCD, Pia Orrenius, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas

Hans Dietrich von Loffelholz, BAMF, Nuernberg

Katherine Richardson, SJSU

1pm Integration Patterns: Implications for Policy

John Skrentny and Gary Lee, UCSD

Friedrich Heckmann, Uni Bamberg, efms

Comments: David Kyle, UCD, Jeff Pennington, UCB

2:30 US immigration reform proposals

Philip Martin and Kevin Johnson, UC-Davis

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

8:15 New Modes of Migration Management? Return Agreements, Circular Migration and Partnerships

Implications of EU’s Lisbon Treaty, Kay Hailbronner, Uni Konstanz

Putting Country-Specific Immigration Arrangements in U.S. Historical Perspective, Hiroshi Motomura, UCLA

Transational Migration Management, Daniel Thym, Humboldt University Resettlement of Refugees in Europe, Achilles Skordas, University of Bristol

EU Approaches to Protection in the Region, Julia Schieber, University of Konstanz

The GFMD and Migration and Development, Irena Omelaniuk, GFMD Task Force

Circular Migration and Integration: Squaring the Circle, Christiane Kuptsch, ILO

10:45 The Role of Public International and Comparative Law in the Development of Migration Law

Recent Developments in the Swiss Law on Aliens, Daniel Thürer, University of Zürich

Supranational Representation under German Constitutional Law: a Paradigm Shift with Incalculable Consequences, Marcel Kau, University of Konstanz

Russian Migration Policy, Sergei Ryazantsev, Russian Academy of Sciences

The Impact of International and Comparative Law on the Immigration Regime of the United States, Jim Nafziger, Willamette University

12:30 Conclusions and Next Steps, Kay Hailbronner and Philip Martin

University of California International Migration Conference

Introduction and Panel 1. Ethnicity and the Politics of Immigration
 

Panel 2. Assimilation and Transnationalism
 

Panel 3. Immigration and the Welfare State
 

Panel 4. Immigration Law and Control
 


On March 12, 2010, CCIS will host a University of California-wide conference on international migration. Panels are listed below.

If you are interested in attending the conference, please contact Ana Minvielle, aminvielle@ucsd.edu.

The conference will be held in the Deutz Conference Room of the Institute of the Americas. For directions, please visit the IOA website.

Sponsored by CCIS, The Gifford Center for Population Studies at UC Davis, the Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy at UC Irvine, and UCLA Migration Study Group

Introduction (8:30 – 8:45 AM)

  • David FitzGerald and John Skrentny, CCIS, UCSD

Panel 1. Ethnicity and the Politics of Immigration (8:45 – 10:30 AM)

  • Immigration and the Political Transformation of White America: How Local Immigrant Context Shapes White Policy Views and Partisanship. Marisa Abrajano, Political Science, UCSD
  • Beyond the Ballot: Immigration Collective Action in Traditional and New Destinations in the U.S. Dina Okamoto, Sociology, UC Davis
  • Immigration Reforms and Immigrant/Ethnic Community Politics: Immigrant Generation and Latino Policy Preferences on Immigration Reform. Louis DeSipio, Political Science, UC Irvine
  • “In A Race All Their Own”: The Quest to Make Mexicans Ineligible for U.S. Citizenship. Natalia Molina, Ethnic Studies, UCSD
  • Chair and Discussant: Zoltan Hajnal, Political Science, UCSD

Break (10:30 – 11:00 AM)

Panel 2. Assimilation and Transnationalism (11:00 AM-12:45 PM)

  • Inheriting the homeland?: Intergenerational transmission of cross-border ties in migrant families. Thomas Soehl, Sociology, UCLA
  • A Rhizomatic Diaspora: Transnational Passage and the Sense of Place among Koreans in Latin America. Kyeyoung Park, Anthropology, UCLA
  • Between “Europe” and “Africa”: Building the “New” Ukraine on the Shoulders of Migrant Women. Cinzia Solari, Sociology, UC Berkeley
  • Chair and Discussant: Erin Hamilton, Sociology, UC Davis

Panel 3. Immigration and the Welfare State (1:45-3:30 PM)

  • Children of Immigrants in U.S. Schools: Today’s English Learners, Tomorrow’s Workforce. April Linton, Sociology, UC San Diego
  • Immigration and the Welfare State: Diversity, Public Assistance and Immigrant Incorporation. Frank Bean, Sociology, UC Irvine
  • A New Nativism or an American Tradition? Federal Citizenship and Legal Status Restrictions for Medicaid and Welfare. Cybelle Fox, Sociology, UC Berkeley
  • Chair and Discussant: Micah Gell-Redman, Political Science, UCSD

Break (3:30-4:00 PM)

Panel 4. Immigration Law and Control (4:00-5:45 PM)

  • Race and Immigration Law in the Americas, 1850-2000. David FitzGerald, Sociology, UCSD
  • A Global Documentary Regime? Regulating Mobility from the Developing World. Kamal Sadiq, Political Science, UC Irvine
  • A Diversion of Attention?: Immigration Courts and the Adjudication of Fourth and Fifth Amendment Rights. Jennifer M. Chacón, Law, UC Irvine
  • Chair and Discussant: David Kyle, Sociology, UC Davis

Note: This event is not sponsored by the Institute of the Americas

Race, Immigration and the Law of the Workplace: 21st Century Challenges

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The objective of this conference, which will take place on February 26 and 27, 2010 at Princeton, is to bring together scholars engaging in the intersections of law, immigration, race and the workplace. Mass immigration has had a huge impact on labor, on citizenship, on understandings of race and ethnicity, and on American politics. The law has been evolving as well. We will bring together a group of social scientists and legal scholars in these areas to create a dialog among those whose interests intersect but for professional reasons rarely interact. This conference is co-sponsored by the Princeton University Program in Law and Public Affairs, where it will be held.

Immigration and the new dynamics of employment discrimination

  • Jennifer Gordon, Fordham Law School
  • Robin Lenhardt, Fordham Law School
  • Jennifer Lee, UC Irvine Sociology
  • Tomás Jiménez, Stanford University, Sociology
  • Deborah Malamud, NYU Law School

Immigration and the challenge to labor unions

  • Dorian Warren, Columbia University, Political Science
  • Ruben Garcia, California-Western Law School
  • Ruth Milkman, Hunter College, City University of New York, Sociology
  • Janice Fine, Rutgers School of Management

Immigration and the meaning of citizenship

  • Cristina Rodriguez, NYU Law School
  • Linda Bosniak, Rutgers Law School
  • Mae Ngai, Columbia University, History
  • Desmond King, Oxford University, Politics

Policy prospects in the age of Obama

  • Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt History
  • Jennifer Hochschild, Harvard University, Government
  • Michael Jones-Correa, Princeton, Center for the Study of Democratic Politics
  • Glenn Loury, Brown University, Economics
  • Mark Sawyer, UCLA, Political Science

Migration Across the Disciplines: A Symposium on How the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities Study Population Movements

migration-across-disciplinesThis conference was made possible through the generous support of the Dean of Arts and Humanities, the Dean of Social Sciences, California Cultures in Comparative Perspective, the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies (CCIS), and the following departments: Anthropology; Ethnic Studies; History; Literature, and Visual Arts.

Migration Across the Disciplines Agenda »

State and Local Immigration Policy in the U.S.: An Interdisciplinary Workshop

hazelton

A conference bringing together social scientists and legal scholars to document and explain the rising incidence of immigration policy activism among state and local governments in the United States.

State and Local Immigration Policy in the U.S.: An Interdisciplinary Workshop Agenda »

State and Local Immigration Policy in the U.S.: An Interdisciplinary Workshop Report »