Feb 20: Sixth Annual UC International Migration Conference

The Sixth Annual UC International Migration Conference
“Immigration Policy at Varying Scales”

to be held at the University of California Riverside School of Public Policy
Friday, February 20, 2015

CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR THE SIXTH ANNUAL
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION CONFERENCE

Despite the lack of Congressional legislation on immigration policy, there have been significant policy developments on immigrant integration and immigration enforcement at the national, state, and local levels. Immigration policy has also been an important area of activity in other countries, and in the work of international organizations.
How are we to make sense of all this?
The Sixth Annual UC conference on international migration is pleased to welcome scholarship on immigration policy, at any level of analysis, on any topic, and from any social science discipline. The focus on policy is especially timely, as UC Riverside launches its new School of Public Policy. In addition to paper presentations, we plan to have a keynote speaker on immigration policy in California (to be announced).
Those interested in presenting should email ucmigrationconference@gmail.com with a title and abstract of 150-200 words. We will provide free accommodations and travel subsidies (up to 100%) for all presenters at the conference.Please note the following criteria and deadlines, and please share widely.
ELIGIBILITY: Ph.D. candidates and faculty members in the University of California who are paper authors or coauthors
DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS: December 31, 2014
NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCES: January 9, 2015

 

Fifth Annual University of California Conference on International Migration

Fifth Annual University of California Conference on International Migration:
Immigrant Integration in Comparative Perspective

January 31 – February 1, 2014

Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, UC San Diego

To be held at the Great Hall

Agenda

Co-sponsored by the  Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy (UC Irvine) & Program on International Migration (UCLA)

With the participation of the Gifford Center for Population Studies (UC Davis) and Division of Social Sciences (UC Santa Cruz)

REPORT NOW AVAILABLE: Understanding Change in Science & Engineering – July 12 & 13 Workshop

Building the Innovation Economy? The Challenges of Defining, Creating and Maintaining the STEM Workforce: 

For several years, policymakers in Washington, academic and other experts, and industry leaders have emphasized the importance of the so-called “STEM” fields—science, technology, engineering and math—for economic growth, national competitiveness and security, and job creation. Yet we still know little about how this crucial sector of the economy works, and in particular, why industry demands ever more foreign workers even as many US workers are leaving this vibrant sector, and how US workers keep their skill sets current in the face of continual change. Most broadly, we need to understand what STEM actually means. It is a term that is used widely, and even forms the basis of legislation, yet it resists a clear definition.

These are some major conclusions from a workshop held at the University of California-San Diego on July 12 and 13, 2013. The workshop, sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, brought together academic specialists from fields as diverse as economics, education, management, public policy, and sociology to meet with industry leaders representing biotech, finance, software, telecommunications, and tech journalism, for a results-oriented and wide-ranging discussion of these important issues. Several key conclusions, as well as related readings by workshop participants, are included.

Download Here: CCIS.BuildingTheInnovationEconomy

UC-wide Immigration Conference 2013

“We asked for workers and families came:” Children, youth and families in migration

Friday, February 22, 2013
9am to 8pm (including dinner and cultural event)
University of California, Los Angeles
(385 Charles E. Young Drive, 1242 Law Building, Los Angeles, California 90095)

This conference draws together UC-wide faculty and students who study children, youth and families in relation to migration issues, broadly defined. Collectively, we want to address such questions as: How do migration experiences shape the experiences of growing up and raising children? How do current immigration policies affect families? How are the children of immigrants faring in educational contexts? What identities are they forming? What are their daily lives and experiences, and aspirations for the future? What policies and practices best support the health and welfare of immigrant children, youth and families? How does the recognition of children’s claims to educational access and to various forms of lawful status (ranging from Deferred Action to U.S. citizenship), based on their ties or their birth in the United States, both reflect and affect fundamental notions of citizenship and belonging?

To RSVP, click here.

For more information, click here or contact Peter Catron at pcatron@ucla.edu.

* Jointly sponsored with UCLA


SCHEDULE (Rooms subject to change):

8:30-9:00 a.m. BREAKFAST AND REGISTRATION

Held in the hallway outside of Room 1347.

9:00-9:15 a.m. WELCOME

ROOM  1347.

Remarks by Marcelo Suarez-Orozco.

9:15-10:45 a.m.  PLENARY SESSION: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN IMMIGRATION LAW

ROOM  1347.

10:45-11:00 a.m. BREAK

Refreshments provided outside of Room 1347.

11:00-12:30 p.m. PLENARY SESSION: YOUTH, FAMILY, AND IMMIGRANT HEALTH

ROOM 1347.

12:30-1:30 p.m. LUNCH

Boxed lunches are located outside of Room 1347.

1:30-2:30 p.m. POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Poster presentations are located in the hallway outside of Room 1347.

2:30-3:45 p.m. BREAKOUT PANELS, SESSION A

ROOM 1347: IMMIGRANT PARENTS AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY

ROOM 1457: IMMIGRANT RIGHTS AND PUBLIC OPINION

ROOM 1420: HOUSEHOLD AND COMMUNITY DYNAMIC

ROOM 1430: MOBILIZATION AND EXPERIENCE OF BEING UNDOCUMENTED

3:45-4:00 p.m. BREAK

4:00-5:15 p.m. BREAKOUT PANELS, SESSION B

ROOM 1347: GENERATIONAL PATHWAYS

ROOM 1457: IDENTITY AND BELONGING

ROOM 1420: TRANSNATIONALISM AND FAMILIES

ROOM 1430: UNDOCUMENTED TENSIONS

ROOM 1347: EDUCATION OF LATINO IMMIGRANTS

6:00-8:30 p.m. Dinner (with keynote speaker and cultural event) 

The Politics of Race and Place Workshop

Keynote Speaker and Session 1: Local Context and Its Impact on Political behavior and Attitudes
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/audio/Session_1.mp3[/podcast]

Session 2: Policy Implications of Demographic Change
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/audio/Session_2.mp3[/podcast]

February 24, 2012

12:00-5:30pm

UCSD, The Weaver Center, Institute of Americas

12:00-12:10 Welcome and Introduction, Marisa Abrajano (UCSD) and R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

12:15-1:15 Lunch and Keynote Speaker, Michael J. Aguirre (Former San Diego City Attorney), “Putting Research Into Action”

Moderator: Steve Erie, UCSD

1:15-3:15 Session 1: Local Context and Its Impact on Political Behavior and Attitudes

1. Marisa Abrajano (UCSD) and R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

2. Zoltan Hajnal (UCSD), “Multi-Ethnic Context and Minority Policy Attitudes”

Discussant: Ron Schmidt (CSULB)

3. Janelle Wong (USC), “Immigration, Religion and Conservative Politics in Houston and L.A.”

Discussant: Mark Sawyer (UCLA)

4. Pei-te Lien (UCSB), ” Race, Place, Gender, and Minority Representation in Local Elective Offices”

Discussant: Leland Saito (USC)

3:15-3:30 Coffee Break

3:30-5:00 Session 2: Policy Implications of Demographic Change

5. Justin Levitt (Loyola Law School), Municipal Redistricting Outside the Box

Discussant: Thad Kousser (UCSD)

6. Lisa Garcia Bedolla (Cal), “Ethnorace and Place: Political Socialization among Immigrant Youth in Orange County”

Discussant: R. Michael Alvarez (Cal Tech)

7. Jane Junn (USC) and Vladimir Medenica (USC), “Attitudes on Immigration Policy in California: Party Identification and Local Context”

Discussant: Roderick Kiewiet (Cal Tech)

5:00-5:30   Closing Remarks

UC International Migration Conference 2012

Panel 1. Local Policy Responses
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/audio/Panel 1-Local Policy Responses.mp3[/podcast]

Panel 2. Unauthorized Migration
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/audio/Panel 2_Unauthorized Migration.mp3[/podcast]

Lunch Speaker
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Lunch_Speaker.mp3[/podcast]

Panel 3. Latino Politics
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/audio/Panel 3_Latino Politics.mp3[/podcast]

Panel 4. Refugees and Security
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/audio/Panel 4_Refugees and Secuirty.mp3[/podcast]

CCIS will host the Third Annual University of California Conference on International Migration: Politics and Governance on Friday, February 10, 2012.

The conference will take place in the Weaver Center of the Institute of the Americas – University of California, San Diego.  For directions, click here.

If you are interested in attending the conference, contact Ana Minvielle.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy, UC Irvine; UCLA Program on International Migration; and Gifford Center for Population Studies, UC Davis


SCHEDULE (Rooms subject to Change):

8:00-8:30am COFFEE AND WELCOME

David FitzGerald, UC San Diego

John Skrentny, UC San Diego

8:30-10:00am PANEL 1. Local Policy Responses

Karthick Ramakrishnan, UCR, “Polarized Change:  An Evidence-Based Theory of Subnational Immigration Regulation”

Jennifer Chacon, UCI, “Overcriminalizing Immigration”

Angela Garcia, UCSD, “Return to Sender? A Comparative Analysis of Immigrant Communities in ‘Attrition through Enforcement’ Destinations”

Discussant: Zoli Hajnal, UCSD

10:00- 10:30am BREAK

10:30am-12:30pm PANEL 2. Unauthorized Migration

Wayne Cornelius, UCSD, “Evaluating the Costs and Efficacy of U.S. Immigration Enforcement: A National Academy of Sciences Study”

Frank Bean, UCI, “Unauthorized Mexican Migration:  Effects on Second-Generation Educational Attainment”

Ruben Hernandez-Leon, UCLA, “The (Undocumented) Migration Industry as a Bastard Institution”

Discussant: Esther Castillo, UCI

12:30-1:30pm LUNCH

Speaker: Roberto Suro, USC, “After the Storm:  The immigration policy debate in the wake of the great recession”

1:30-3:00pm PANEL 3. Latino Politics

Cristina Mora, UCB, “Hispanic Panethnicity”

Rodney Hero, UCB, “Exploring the Strength of ‘American’ Identity among Latinos: Considering the Role of ‘Liberal’ Values, Ascriptive Factors, and Demographic Characteristics”

David Sears, UCLA, “Do national and ethnic identities collide?”

Susan Bibler Coutin, UCI, “Memory, Membership, and Rights:  Activism among Salvadoran Youth”

Discussant: Susan Brown, UCI

3:00-3:30pm BREAK

3:30-5:00pm PANEL 4. Refugees and Security

Phil Wolgin, Center for American Progress (formerly UCB), “Encouraging Defection while Discouraging Admissions: U.S. Policy toward Refugees in Asia’s Berlin, 1950-1965″

Kate Jastram, UCB, “Seeking Asylum, Suspected of War Crimes: Weighing Persecution by the Persecuted”

Robbie Totten, UCLA/CCIS, “Security Objectives and U.S. Refugee Policy”

Discussant: David Pedersen, UCSD

6:00pm DINNER & KEYNOTE ADDRESS (invited panelists and discussants only)

Edward Alden, Council on Foreign Relations, “Are U.S. Borders Finally Secure? Evidence and Implications for the Immigration Debate”

Ethnicity, Race, & Indigenous Peoples in Latin America & the Caribbean

On November 3-5, 2011, the University of California, San Diego will host the Second Conference on Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America and the Caribbean. The event is organized and sponsored by ERIP (LASA Section on Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples), CILAS-UCSD (Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies, University of California, San Diego), CLAS-SDSU (Center for Latin American Studies, San Diego State University), LACES (Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies, journal published by Taylor & Francis and housed at UCSD), Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies (University of California, San Diego), and CCIS (Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, University of California, San Diego).

As explained in the Call for Panels and Papers, the conference will cover topics related to all aspects of ethnicity, race relations, Indigenous peoples, Afro-descendants and other ethnic or racial groups in Latin America and the Caribbean. Participants will include a large number of professional scholars and graduate students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, as well as activists and practitioners from grassroots organizations and NGOs. The program will feature multiple thematic panels organized into parallel sessions, presentations by keynote speakers, and receptions and other events, beginning on Thursday November 3rd and continuing through Saturday November 5th.

The LASA Section on Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples (ERIP) and the journal Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies (LACES) have jointly established a Travel Grants fund to assist participants’ travel from Latin American and the Caribbean, on a competitive basis. They will also sponsor the ERIP-LACES Student Paper Award to recognize the best work submitted by graduate students at the conference.

The First ERIP conference, which took place in May 2008 at the University of California, San Diego, brought together more than 300 participants and attendees. Because of the high level of interest and the existence of space, time and budget constraints, we urge prospective participants to submit their Panel Proposal Forms and Individual Paper Proposal Forms as early as possible in order to improve their chances of securing a place in the program.  Early registration is also recommended to those interested in simply attending the conference.

ERIP Conference Organizing and Program Committee:
Shannon Speed, Chair ERIP
Leon Zamosc, Chief Editor LACES
David Mares, Director CILAS-UCSD
Ramona Perez, Director CLAS-SDSU

The Politics of Naturalization in Europe, Asia, and North America

Introduction and Panel 1. Europe
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/audio/PANEL_1.mp3[/podcast]

Panel 2. North America
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/PANEL_2.mp3[/podcast]

Panel 3. Asia
[podcast]http://ccis.ucsd.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/PANEL_3.mp3[/podcast]

Conference Report »

UC San Diego. May 20, 2011.

The Weaver Conference Center.

How do liberal states make immigrants into nationals? For some observers, a postnational future beckons in which universal rights of personhood strip national identity of its relevance for claiming the rights of citizenship. According to others, transnational migrants can pick and choose their affiliations to multiple polities. For still others, differences between liberal states are becoming obsolete either because official multiculturalism renders the idea of national core cultures illegitimate or the universalistic qualities of liberalism strips states of their national distinction. Even among scholars of nationality and citizenship, the issue of making national difference is often elided by a focus on those features of nationality law that are converging across liberal states.

To what extent is there a convergence in naturalization policies among liberal states that receive large numbers of immigrants? What explains the variation or convergence?

The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego, will host a conference to assess these questions on Friday, May 20, 2011. Funding is provided by a UCSD International, Comparative, and Area Studies (IIACAS) and Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) International Collaborative Research grant.

In order to RSVP for the event, please contact Ana Minvielle at aminvielle@ucsd.edu.

View Full Agenda »


“The Politics of Naturalization in Europe, Asia, and North America”

May 20, 2011 at CCIS

SCHEDULE (Rooms subject to change):


9:30-10am

COFFEE AND WELCOME

David FitzGerald, UC San Diego


10am-Noon

PANEL 1: EUROPE

Maarten Vink, Universiteit Maastricht, on national variation in the EU

Sara Wallace Goodman, UC Irvine, on citizenship tests in the EU

Alberto Martín-Pérez, University of Barcelona

Discussant: Jon Fox, University of Bristol


Noon-1pm

LUNCH


1-2:30pm

PANEL 2: NORTH AMERICA

Hiroshi Motomura, UCLA, on the U.S. case

Catherine Dauvergne, University of British Columbia, on the Canadian case

Discussant: Irene Bloemraad, UC Berkeley


2:30-3pm

BREAK


3-4:30pm

PANEL 3: ASIA

Kamal Sadiq, UC Irvine

John Skrentny and Gary Lee, UC San Diego

Discussant: Mara Loveman, University of Wisconsin

Immigration at the National and Local Level in Japan

May 6-7, 2011, Weaver Conference Center, UC San Diego

With support from CCIS and participation from co-director David FitzGerald, UC San Diego School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IR/PS) hosts a two-day conference featuring leading academics from Japan, Brazil, Australia, and the United States who will examine the impact of future economic growth and community relations in Japan and the United States.

Admission is free, but registration is required.  Click here to register.

For more information, visit the website or contact Lane Ogawa.


Friday, May 6, 2011

Welcome

9:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

Ulrike Schaede, UC San Diego and Kazuhisa Nishihara, Nagoya University

Introduction

9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Ulrike Schaede, UC San Diego and Lindsey Sasaki, New York University

Session 1 – What is Immigration and its Implication for Japan, the United States, and Europe?

10:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

– Yuri Okina, Japan Research Institute
“Japan’s challenge with economic growth and demographic situation”
– Teruyuki Komatsu, Nagoya Gakuin University
“Brief history of Japanese immigration abroad since Meiji period”
– Apichai Shipper, University of Southern California
“Japan’s immigration politics in comparative perspective”
– Tadamasa Murai, Nagoya City University
“Japan’s distinct immigration policy in comparison with the U.S.A. and EU”

Discussant
David Fitzgerald, UC San Diego and Nancy Gilson, UC San Diego

Session 2 – The Economic and Demographic Effects of Immigration in Japan and the United States

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

– Kyoji Fukao, Hitosubashi University
“The Economic Impact of Migration: Productivity Analysis for Japan and the US at the National and the Local Level”
– Junichi Goto, Keio University
“Aging, Migration, and Female Workers in Japan: The Impact on Future Economic Growth”

Discussant
Gordon Hanson, UC San Diego

Session 3 – The Education and Adaptation of Migrant Children in Japan and the United States

2:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

– June Gordon, UC Santa Cruz
“Transnational Migration: Identity and Schooling of Nikkei Youth.”
– Kaori Okano, La Trobe University
“Educating migrant children: multicultural policies and practices”
– Marcelo Suarez-Orosco, New York University
“LISA study of the Harvard Immigration Project”

Discussant
Christena Turner, UC San Diego and Eiko Ushida, UC San Diego

Saturday, May 7, 2011
Session 1 – The Discourse of Immigration Policy, Citizenship, Multiculturalism, and Nationalism at the National and Local Level

9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

– Masato Ninomiya, University of São Paulo
“Judicial Cooperation between Brazil and Japan concerning the presence of Brazilian workers in Japan”
– Hideki Tarumoto, Hokkaido University
“Transformation of citizenship institutions in the global migration era”
– Joseph Hankins, UC San Diego
“Multiculturalism in Japan”

Discussant
Megumi Naoi, UC San Diego

Session 2 – The Development of Community Building and Social Movements in Japan

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

– Kazuhisa Nishihara, Nagoya University
“Immigrants from Asia to Contemporary Japan: Focus on the case of Chinese agricultural trainees”
– Hwaji Shin, University of San Francisco
“Zainichi Koreans’ social movements and citizenship in Japan”

Discussant
Lindsey Sasaki, New York University

Session 3 – The Integration of Immigrant Workers in Japan

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

– Keiko Yamanaka, UC Berkeley
“The 2008-09 Economic Crisis, Massive Unemployment of Immigrant Workers, and Efforts to Assist Them in Central Japan”
– Hiroshi Yamaguchi, Nagoya University
“South Americans in Japanese Industrial Cities: Social Environment and the Model of Integration”

Discussant
Ulrike Schaede, UC San Diego

UC International Migration Conference 2011

February 26 – Second Annual UC Migration Conference hosted by the Gifford Center

The Gifford Center and UCSD’s Center for Comparative Immigration Studies (CCIS) will host the Second Annual University of California Migration Conference on February 26, 2011 at UC Davis. This multi-disciplinary conference will provide an opportunity for University of California faculty and advanced graduate students to share their current migration-related research. Click here for information about last year’s conference, held at UCSD. If you are a UC faculty member or advanced graduate student and are interested in attending, please contact Prof. David J. Kyle at djkyle@ucdavis.edu

View Full Agenda »