April 8 – Social Sciences Supper Club – What’s Next for U.S. Immigration Reform and Border Enforcement?

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 – 5:30pm Special Reception & 6pm Talk & Dinner

RSVP Online by April 4 at alumni.ucsd.edu/supperclub

Supper-Club APR 8 2014 Invite (2)Supper-Club APR 8 2014 Invite (3)A comprehensive immigration reform bill backed by a bipartisan Senate majority and President Obama is currently causing tremendous controversy. This presentation will examine the political, demographic, and economic origins of immigration reform and the prospects for passage. Drawing on research conducted by UCSD students, we will discuss how current U.S. policies are affecting migration from Mexico to the United States.

With David FitzGerald, Co-Director of CCIS and the Gildred Chair in U.S.-Mexican Relations at UCSD

Supper Club events include a wine reception, full dinner and Faculty Club parking in addition to the lecture. $65 per person; $50 alumni price.

May 12-18: The Summer Course on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues

The Summer Course on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues is an internationally acclaimed seven-day, non-credit course for academic and field-based practitioners working in the area of forced migration. It serves as a hub for researchers, students, practitioners, service providers and policy makers to share information and ideas.  The Summer Course is housed within the Centre for Refugee Studies, York University. All participants who complete the full course receive a York University Centre for Refugee Studies Summer Course Certificate.

Dates: May 12-18, 2014
Location: York University, Toronto, Canada Course Fee: $1400 CAD +13%HST (until April 1, 2014)

2014 Summer Course topics will include:

  •  Forced displacement: International case studies
  • Legal approaches to refugee studies
  • UNHCR, the Convention and the international refugee regime
  • Humanitarian aid: a comparative perspective
  • Refugee resettlement policy
  • Urban refugees
  • Internally displaced populations
  • Age, gender and diversity mainstreaming in forced migration
  • Sexual minority claims
  • Environmentally-induced displacement
  • Externalization of asylum
  • Transitional justice
  • Detention practices

 

For more information, and to apply, please visit our website at http://crs.yorku.ca/summer/

Feb. 20 – March 4: Faculty Fellow Chats with Dr. Victoria Ojeda

 

FacultyFellowChatW14“Becoming A Public Health & International Migration Researcher”

Thursday, February 20

1PM in The Great Hall

 

“Current State of Deportation Research on the U.S.-Mexico Border”

Thursday, February 27

12PM in The Great Hall

 

“Lessons Learned in Research with Vulnerable Populations”

Tuesday, March 4

11AM in The Great Hall

Interreligious Reflections on Immigration Seminar: Nov. 22-25, 2014

 American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, November 22-25, 2014

Statement of Purpose: 

The overall purpose of this seminar is to promote interreligious and interdisciplinary dialogue and reflection on immigration, broadly conceived. Globalization and the ever-increasing movement of individuals and groups across multiple types of borders are fertile ground for theological and religious exploration. The issue of immigration and religion is especially timely. This seminar continues the work of scholars of diverse religious, cultural, ethnic, racial, and gender identities whose collaborations resulted in the publication of Strangers in this World: Multi-Religious Reflections on Immigration (Fortress Press, early 2015). This new seminar will work towards publication of a follow-up volume and coordinate with other related AAR program units to help address the growing interest and need for more religious reflections on immigration.

Call for Papers: 

The Interreligious Reflections on Immigration Seminar invites proposals for papers that address religion and immigration, broadly conceived. This is the first year of the Seminar whose goal is to produce a follow-up volume to Strangers in this World: Multi-Religious Reflections (Fortress Press, 2015). Scholars interested in contributing to the new volume of essays are encouraged to submit a proposal/abstract that addresses immigration and religion from any scholarly perspective—for example, philosophical, economic, political, theological, historical, and sociological. Selected proposals will be invited for further discussion at the seminar session at the San Diego AAR, 2014 meeting.

Leadership: 

Chairs: Alexander Y. Hwang, hwangalex@yahoo.com; Laura Alexander, lek2fb@virginia.edu

Steering Committee: Joseph Mas, Karma Lekshe Tsomo, Kristine Suna-Koro, Laura Tilghman

Papers may be submitted through the American Academy of Religion’s PAPERS website; please see http://www.aarweb.org/annual-meeting/call-for-papers.

 

Changing Population: Migration, Reproduction and Identity: June 3-5, 2014

University of Trento, June 3-5, 2014

Changing Population: Migration, Reproduction and Identity

The social sciences have long debated the use of racial, ethnic and national categories in analyzing processes of collective identity construction. Anthropology and Sociology have both contributed to uncovering the implicit essentialism underlying the racial and cultural definitions of difference conventionally used to identify, subdivide and classify human populations. At the same time, contemporary processes of social and cultural interconnection, fueled by intense global mobility, are challenging, bridging and overturning institutional boundaries of identity and belonging. National citizenship categories in particular have become increasingly limiting and constrictive in relation to the wide variety of reproductive practices individuals enact transnationally. Issues such as the family basis of migration, the fertility and birthrates of migrants and ethnic minorities, the rise in mixed marriages, the transnational spread of familial and kinship networks and the access to citizenship for “second-generations” are only the most visible signs of a deeply rooted change, which impacts the composition and shape of national populations and triggers new citizenship claims.

Faced with these processes, dominant demographic discourse has adopted ethno-racial classifications and slipped easily into a rhetoric of danger: the danger of invasion, extinction, poverty and cultural disintegration. Still lacking or underdeveloped is a primarily social analysis of the demographic developments at play that draws on socio-anthropological research in order to problematize the demographic construction of minorities, in opposition to national demography; and, at the same time, that explores how individuals and communities ensure their own biological, social and cultural continuity despite and across ethno-national boundaries.

This conference aims to establish a space for international and interdisciplinary dialogue on contemporary socio-demographic shifts. We propose to focus in particular on the biopolitics of reproduction put in motion by both national governments, as they distinguish between citizens and non-citizens, and migrants and their descendents, as they affirm, negotiate or refrain from constructing their own definitions of family, kinship, genealogy and belonging.

In this perspective, which primarily addresses the intersection of reproduction and identity in relation to migrants and multicultural contexts, we invite papers exploring the following issues:

- The analytical categories and classifications employed in research on population, namely ethnicity, race, nation, culture and group;

- Demographic politics and systems for defining national populations;

- Family reunification and the ethno-national bases of welfare systems;

- The marriage practices, reproductive behavior and social genealogies of migrants and their descendents;

- Family planning policies and fertility management among migrants and minorities;

- Notions of identity and continuity in transnational migration.

 

The conference is organised by the SMMS Research Unit (Migration Scenarios and Social Change), Department of Sociology and Social Research, University of Trento.

Confirmed keynote speakers include David Kertzer and Pnina Werbner.

Abstracts (300 words), containing a description of the main argument, the key question(s) driving the paper and the kind of evidence analysed, should be sent by 20 February 2014 to the following address: smms@soc.unitn.it. For further information please contact the conference coordinators, Francesca Decimo [francesca.decimo@unitn.it] Alessandra Gribaldo [alegribaldo@women.it] and Paolo Boccagni [paolo.boccagni@unitn.it].

Acceptance will be notified by 28th of February 2014. Full papers (5-8.000 words) are expected by 30th April 2014.

Migration Research Unit Student Conference 2014

Child & Youth Migrants: Global And Interdisciplinary Perspectives
University College London, 14 June 2014

Please submit applications with a title, 1 page abstract, and CV to: geog.migrationconference@ucl.ac.uk no later than 1 March 2014. Presentations will be about 20 minutes long. If you will require a visa to attend the conference, please consider submitting your application before the deadline to ensure you have enough time to apply for your visa.

For more information, please visit the conference website: http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/ucl-migration-conference

 

Click here for Flyer >>

Feb. 20 – Beginning Again: Refugees, San Diego and the Politics of Resettlement

IRC-Prospect collab draft 4You are invited to join the International Rescue Committee on February 20, 2014 at 7PM at The Great Hall. Come learn about the large refugee community here in San Diego County and how the International Rescue Committee is working to help them assimilate into American life through practical assistance.

Speakers will share their unique stories of their involvement with the IRC and how you can personally get involved.

Sambusas catered by RED

Challenge to the Secular State: The Christian Right in America -Thursday, Jan. 30th

The UCSD Department of Sociology Yankelovich Endowed Chair Speaker Series presents:

“Challenge to the Secular State: The Christian Right in America”

w/ Professor Christian Joppke

 Thursday, January 30, 2014

12:30-2:00pm

Institute of the Americas- Deutz room

with reception immediately following

Professor Christian Joppke

download (2)

University of Bern

Christian Joppke is a comparative political sociologist. His past and present research interests cover social movements and the state, citizenship and immigration, most recently religion and politics, especially Islam in Western societies. Professor Joppke holds a chair in sociology at the University of Bern, Switzerland.  He received a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1989. Previously he taught at the University of Southern California, European University Institute, University of British Columbia, International University Bremen, and American University of Paris. He has also held research fellowships at Georgetown University and the Russell Sage Foundation, New York. Among his recent books are Citizenship and Immigration (Cambridge: Polity, 2010), Veil: Mirror of Identity (Cambridge: Polity, 2009), and Selecting by Origin: Ethnic Migration in the Liberal State (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2005).

For Directions to the Institute of Americas see map.

For further information, please contact Katrina Richards at kkoopman@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-2779

 The Yankelovich Speaker Series is envisioned by Daniel Yankelovich, a Division of Social Sciences benefactor and sponsor of the Endowed Chair on Social Thought.

 

Call for Papers: 3rd Seminar of Studies on Brazilian Migration in Europe

The Seminar on the Studies of Brazilian Migration in Europe has had two previous editions. The first one was in Spain in 2010 and then in Portugal in 2012. It is a biennial event which will have its third edition at the Institute of Education – University of London. This 2014 edition has been brought to the UK via the work being developed by GEB, the Brazilian Migration to the UK Research Group.

The 3rd Seminar of Studies on Brazilian Migration in Europe invites proposals for presentations (oral and posters) in Portuguese, Spanish and English on any aspect of research on migration.

Topics may include:
Business, cultural practices, discrimination, diversity, education, family, gender, health, identity(ies), media, migration flows, political representation, religion, return, sexuality, social networks, urban space, among others.

Abstract should be no longer than 300 words maximum and can be in Portuguese, Spanish or English.

Format: Title, Name, Affiliation, Type of presentation (Oral or Poster), Topic contribution and Abstract (Times New Roman, font size 12, 1.5 Space)

Important Dates:

14th February 2014 – Abstract Submission Deadline
28th February 2014 – Results (will be informed via e-mail)

Please send your Abstract to: seminariobrasil2014@yahoo.co.uk

Please note that in order to have the abstract published and the presentation included in the programme, registrations must be made no later than 7th March 2014.

For further information please visit:

http://3seminariobrasileuropa2014.wordpress.com

PhD Partnership in Global Social Protection Transnational Studies Initiative – Harvard University

Starting in January 2014, TSI will host one or two PhD or post-doctoral students working on related topics who would like to partner with us on this intellectual journey. These individuals will work with Professors Levitt and Viterna on developing these ideas, participate in all TSI activities, and be welcome to take part in all open University seminars and public conferences. Please download the announcement for details.