Two Arrested in Attempt to Crash Border (NY Times)

new-york-times-logo…The federal agency in charge of patrolling the borders, Customs and Border Protection, has added 11,212 agents in the last three years. In a recent study, Wayne Cornelius, co-director of a center on migration at the University of California, San Diego, found that 28 percent of Mexican immigrants he surveyed in early 2009 had slipped into the United States through a border station, including 52 percent who were hidden inside a vehicle and 39 percent who used fraudulent documents.

“This is now a well-established mode of illegal entry,” Mr. Cornelius said, preferred by women and children and anyone else seeking to minimize the dangers of crossing.

But the study showed that smugglers charge significantly more for passage through a border station, Mr. Cornelius said, up to $5,000 per person compared with $3,000 for a crossing outside a station.

With more than 225 million crossings annually through Southwest border stations, Mr. Cornelius said, “close scrutiny of this massive flow is impossible…”  Read full article »

Billions for a US-Mexico border fence, but is it doing any good? (Christian Science Monitor)

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“…Wayne Cornelius, director emeritus of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California in San Diego, says he has conducted 4,000 interviews with illegal immigrants and potential migrants from Jalisco, Zacatecas, Oaxaca, and Yucatan in the past five years. His assessment:

‘The existing border fortifications do not keep undocumented migrants out of the US. Not even half are being apprehended on any given trip to the border, and of those who are apprehended, the success rate on the second or third try is upwards of 95 percent.’

‘There is no reason to believe that additional investments in the fence project – both physical fencing and the new “virtual fence” – will create an effective deterrent,’ he says…” Read full article »

Report: Fewer Mexicans entering U.S. (USA Today)

USAToday-logoPeople in Mexico are very aware that there’s an economic crisis in the U.S. and that there are far fewer jobs,” says David FitzGerald, associate director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California-San Diego.

In January, he interviewed people in the Mexican town of Tunkás. “Most people in the last year or so have put off their plans to migrate to the U.S.,” he says …  Read full article »

Thursday Immigration Blog Roundup (Daily Kos)

dkosLogo…New data, from a research team led by Wayne Cornelius, Director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San  Diego, indicates that the condition of the U.S. economy is more significant in explaining the recent decline in border apprehensions than any of the enforcement-only measures that have been implemented to date….Read full article »

Immigration decline (San Diego Union-Tribune)

SanDiegoUnionTribune…When a team of researchers from the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at UCSD interviewed more than 1,000 people from a small town in the Mexican state of YucatÁn, they found that about 25 percent fewer people are considering crossing this year, compared to a similar study they did three years ago. The researchers also found that 90 percent of those interviewed said it was getting harder to find gainful employment in the United States… Read full article »

County not go-to spot for Latinos in region (San Diego Union-Tribune)

SanDiegoUnionTribune…”Migrants these days go where the non-agricultural jobs are, and where their relatives have taken up residence,” said Wayne Cornelius, director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California San Diego. “San Diego’s employment base is not particularly attractive these days, especially when the effects of family networks are factored in…” Read full article »