Recession Hits Migrant Workers (KPBS)

kpbs_logo2_2“Here’s another sign the economic recession is global. Money sent home by Mexican migrants last year fell for the first time on record. Economist say its part of a global trend that could get worse.

As part of our series “Rough Water: Navigating San Diego’s Economy,” we’re joined by Wayne Cornelius. He’s director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at UC San Diego.”   Listen to the Interview »

Mexican soccer team: A question of nationality, pride (Chicago Tribune)

chicago_tribune_logo…David Keyes, a researcher at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California at San Diego, said more national teams, especially those in Europe, are wrestling with these questions as their countries receive more immigrants. Keyes, who writes the Culture of Soccer blog, said the debates mirror broader social questions about immigrants assimilating into their new homelands. Mexican soccer fans, he said, want to believe their team’s players bleed red, white and green, as they do.

You almost need an Immigration hearing to determine if a player really cares about his country,” Keyes said…  Read full article »

Samuel Huntington: researcher saw religion as source of conflict (San Diego Union-Tribune)

SanDiegoUnionTribune…That brought a spirited retort from Wayne Cornelius, director of the Center of Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California San Diego. Cornelius wrote in the May/June 2004 Foreign Policy magazine that Huntington’s thesis seemed bizarre. “Young Mexicans today are all too willing to shed their own cultural traditions and embrace U.S. values, such as consumerism,” Cornelius wrote… Read Full Article »

Illegal-immigrant workers driven down hard road (San Diego Union-Tribune)

SanDiegoUnionTribune

… “The vast majority of Mexican migrants who have been in the U.S. for more than a few years have nothing to return to in Mexico,” said Wayne Cornelius, director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California San Diego.

“There are no jobs in their hometowns, and most of their close relatives are already living with them here. Their economic and family bases have shifted to the U.S., so they are strongly inclined to ride out the current hard times.” …  Read full article »