May 19 – Scott Blinder – A Public of Two Minds: Opposition to Immigration and Support for Extreme Right Parties – CCIS Spring Seminar

Scott Blinder, Director of the Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford

Monday, May 19, 12:00pm 
*Lunch will be provided

“A Public of Two Minds: Social Norms, Opposition to Immigration and Support for Extreme Right Parties” The politics of immigration in Europe presents a two-sided puzzle: with anti-immigration sentiments so strong and widespread, why do most anti-immigration parties fail? And, on the other side, why does anti-immigration sentiment persist despite broad acceptance of anti-prejudice norms?  Scott Blinder accouts for these tensions by developing a dual process model of political behavior. Negative socially-shared understandings of “immigrants” shape underlying attitudes, but at the same time internalized anti-prejudice norms provide sharp limits on how far these underlying attitudes can shape political behavior. Supporting evidence comes from original surveys conducted in Britain and Germany, with embedded survey experiments, as well as automated textual analysis of 58,000 articles in British newspapers that mention immigration.

Blinder-migobs Scott Blinder is currently Director of the University of Oxford’s Migration Observatory, a project of COMPAS (Centre on Migration, Policy and Society). In the fall he will take up a faculty position in the Department of Political Science at UMass-Amherst. Blinder’s research focuses mainly on attitudes toward immigration and integration, with a particular interest in how the social norm against prejudice shapes both positive and negative responses to national, ethnic, and religious differences. He also leads a project that monitors and analyzes media coverage of migration, and has conducted work explaining the gender gap in partisanship in the US. His work has appeared in leading academic journals in the US and UK and has been discussed in a wide variety of venues by NGOs, civil servants, and government ministers.

 

April 16 – Celia Falicov and Ellen Beck – Providing Culturally Responsive and Empowering Services for Latino Families – CCIS Spring Seminar

 

Celia Falicov, Clinical Professor, UCSD Family & Preventive Medicine & UCSD Psychiatry
Ellen Beck, Clinical Professor, UCSD Family & Preventive Medicine
Lunch will be provided

A variety of professionals such as health and mental health providers, teachers and lawyers will increasingly work with Latino immigrants of various generations. The commonly used, one-size fits all conceptual and practice approach is insufficient to provide effective services. The more recent “cultural competence” emphasis on ethnic characteristics is often formulaic and stereotyped.This discussion presents a strength-based framework that takes the complexities of cultural diversity and ecological stressors into account, with an emphasis on the impact of migration on core family relationships, such as parent-child and couples.

Celia Jaes Falicov, Ph.D. is a renowned family therapy author, teacher, and clinician, widely respected for her expertise on immigrant families and particularly Latino families. She is Clinical Professor, Department of Family & Preventive Medicine & Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego. She is Past President of the American Family Therapy Academy. Dr. Falicov, who grew up in Argentina, received a Ph.D. in Human Development, the University of Chicago. She has pioneered writings on family transitions, migration, culture and context in clinical practice and has received many professional awards for her distinguished contributions. Her books include Cultural Perspectives in Family Therapy; Family Transitions: Continuity and Change over the Life Cycle, and the widely praised Latino Families in Therapy (2nd Edition, 2014).
Dr. Ellen Beck is Director of Medical Student Education for the Division of Family Medicine at UCSD School of Medicine.  A family physician, she is Co-Founder and Director of the UCSD Student-Run Free Clinic Project,  Director of the national faculty development program, Addressing the Health Needs of the Underserved, as well as a  yearlong Fellowship in Underserved Health Care, the first in the nation.

Dr. Beck and her programs have won awards including the 2013 Kennedy Center/Steven Sondheim Inspirational Teacher Award, 2012 WebMD Magazine Health Hero Award, 2010 James Irvine Foundation California Leadership Award, 2010 KPBS Local Hero Diversity Award, 2008 LEAD San Diego Visionary Award for Diversity, Norman Cousins Award for a medical education program that fosters relationship-centered care, and Society of Teachers of Family Medicine national Innovation award. The free clinic project was featured in a PBS special on integrative medicine called The New Medicine.

 

Co-sponsored by 


For arrangements to accommodate a disability, contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at  deaf-hohrequest@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-9709 (TTY).

April 2 – Who Favors Employment Discrimination Against Immigrants? – CCIS Spring Seminar

Wednesday, April 2, 12:00pm 
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building 
Conference Room 115, First Floor
 Reception will follow


Please join Abdeslam Marfouk for his presentation concerning European perceptions of immigration and employment rights.

Utilizing data from the European Values ​​Study (EVS), the seminar focuses on European attitudes towards immigrants, especially European preference for discrimination against immigrants in terms of access to jobs.

On average, 67 percent of European Union citizens agree with the statement that when jobs are scarce, employers should give priority to citizens over non-naturalized immigrants. The main objective of this talk is to answer to the following question: “Who favors discriminating against immigrants’ access to jobs?” and examine the relationship between the clichés against immigration and this discrimination.


Marfouk, Abdeslam

Dr. Abdeslam Marfouk is research fellow at the Institut Wallon de l´Evaluation, de la Prospective et de la Statistique (IWEPS) and Research Associate at the Department of Economic (DULBEA) of the Universite Libre de Bruxelles [ULB], Belgium. Currently, he is a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies
 (CCIS) of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). He has authored research reports, books chapters and articles in international journals addressing different issues in international migration.

April 8 – Social Sciences Supper Club – What’s Next for U.S. Immigration Reform and Border Enforcement?

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 – 5:30pm Special Reception & 6pm Talk & Dinner

RSVP Online by April 4 at alumni.ucsd.edu/supperclub

Supper-Club APR 8 2014 Invite (2)Supper-Club APR 8 2014 Invite (3)A comprehensive immigration reform bill backed by a bipartisan Senate majority and President Obama is currently causing tremendous controversy. This presentation will examine the political, demographic, and economic origins of immigration reform and the prospects for passage. Drawing on research conducted by UCSD students, we will discuss how current U.S. policies are affecting migration from Mexico to the United States.

With David FitzGerald, Co-Director of CCIS and the Gildred Chair in U.S.-Mexican Relations at UCSD

Supper Club events include a wine reception, full dinner and Faculty Club parking in addition to the lecture. $65 per person; $50 alumni price.

Angela S. Garcia Publishes Article in the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

CCIS Graduate Student and PhD Candidate in Sociology Angela S. Garcia has published an article in the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies.

The paper, titled “Hidden in Plain Sight: How Unauthorized Migrants Strategically Assimilate in Restrictive Localities in California” (download), shows how the immediate legal contexts of receiving communities of unauthorized Mexican immigrants.

 

 

March 3 – U.S. and Foreign STEM PhD’s: Jobs and Workforce (Mis)Matches – CCIS Seminar

CCIS Winter Seminar Series
U.S. and Foreign STEM PhD’s:
Job Preferences, Job Availability and Workforce (Mis)Matches

 


Please join Michael Roach & discussant Kim Barrett, Dean of Graduate Studies at UCSD for this illuminating seminar on immigration and the state of the STEM PhD workforce.Debates regarding immigration reform have highlighted the widening imbalance between the public and private sector STEM PhD workforce. Some argue that the growing number of STEM PhD’s has made it increasingly difficult for graduates to find desirable jobs, forcing them to pursue temporary postdoctoral positions or employment in the private sector in lieu of more preferred faculty careers.On the other hand, there is a rising chorus from both policy makers and firms over the need for a larger STEM PhD workforce in the private sector, with some looking toward immigration reform as an immediate means to satisfy the growing demand for highly skilled workers through the hiring of foreign-born doctorates.Despite the importance of STEM PhD’s to all sectors of the U.S. economy, there is surprisingly little empirical evidence on the drivers of STEM PhDs’ initial career choices. This talk will present new findings from micro panel survey data on the role of career preferences, ability, and labor market conditions in shaping the career choices of recent STEM PhD graduates. These data not only document the potential (mis)match between PhDs’ preferred careers and their actual career outcomes, but they also provide insights into which individuals may be more responsive to policies encouraging private sector employment.


michael_roachMichael Roach is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. His research investigates the research activities and career choices of science and engineering PhD’s, with a particular emphasis on the role of graduate students and faculty in the commercialization of university research and academic entrepreneurship. He also examines the impact of university research on firm innovation and firm patenting strategies.

 

kim_barretKim Barrett joined the faculty of UCSD School of Medicine in 1985, and rose to her current rank of Professor of Medicine in 1996. Her research interests center on the normal and abnormal biology of the intestinal epithelium and their relevance to a variety of digestive diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases, infectious diarrheal diseases, and peptic ulcer disease. She has received a number of honors for her research, including the Bowditch and Davenport Lectureships of the American Physiological Society, and being awarded the degree of Doctor of Medical Science, honoris causa, by Queens University Belfast. She is also the author or editor of several books and monographs and almost two hundred peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters and reviews. In 2006, she was appointed as Dean of Graduate Studies at UCSD.


*Please feel free to bring a lunch.

All CCIS research seminars are podcasted. Search “center for comparative immigration studies” on iTunes and listen to our seminars on the go!For arrangements to accommodate a disability, contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at deaf-hohrequest@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-9709 (TTY).

Feb. 20 – March 4: Faculty Fellow Chats with Dr. Victoria Ojeda

 

FacultyFellowChatW14“Becoming A Public Health & International Migration Researcher”

Thursday, February 20

1PM in The Great Hall

 

“Current State of Deportation Research on the U.S.-Mexico Border”

Thursday, February 27

12PM in The Great Hall

 

“Lessons Learned in Research with Vulnerable Populations”

Tuesday, March 4

11AM in The Great Hall

Interreligious Reflections on Immigration Seminar: Nov. 22-25, 2014

 American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, November 22-25, 2014

Statement of Purpose: 

The overall purpose of this seminar is to promote interreligious and interdisciplinary dialogue and reflection on immigration, broadly conceived. Globalization and the ever-increasing movement of individuals and groups across multiple types of borders are fertile ground for theological and religious exploration. The issue of immigration and religion is especially timely. This seminar continues the work of scholars of diverse religious, cultural, ethnic, racial, and gender identities whose collaborations resulted in the publication of Strangers in this World: Multi-Religious Reflections on Immigration (Fortress Press, early 2015). This new seminar will work towards publication of a follow-up volume and coordinate with other related AAR program units to help address the growing interest and need for more religious reflections on immigration.

Call for Papers: 

The Interreligious Reflections on Immigration Seminar invites proposals for papers that address religion and immigration, broadly conceived. This is the first year of the Seminar whose goal is to produce a follow-up volume to Strangers in this World: Multi-Religious Reflections (Fortress Press, 2015). Scholars interested in contributing to the new volume of essays are encouraged to submit a proposal/abstract that addresses immigration and religion from any scholarly perspective—for example, philosophical, economic, political, theological, historical, and sociological. Selected proposals will be invited for further discussion at the seminar session at the San Diego AAR, 2014 meeting.

Leadership: 

Chairs: Alexander Y. Hwang, hwangalex@yahoo.com; Laura Alexander, lek2fb@virginia.edu

Steering Committee: Joseph Mas, Karma Lekshe Tsomo, Kristine Suna-Koro, Laura Tilghman

Papers may be submitted through the American Academy of Religion’s PAPERS website; please see http://www.aarweb.org/annual-meeting/call-for-papers.

 

Changing Population: Migration, Reproduction and Identity: June 3-5, 2014

University of Trento, June 3-5, 2014

Changing Population: Migration, Reproduction and Identity

The social sciences have long debated the use of racial, ethnic and national categories in analyzing processes of collective identity construction. Anthropology and Sociology have both contributed to uncovering the implicit essentialism underlying the racial and cultural definitions of difference conventionally used to identify, subdivide and classify human populations. At the same time, contemporary processes of social and cultural interconnection, fueled by intense global mobility, are challenging, bridging and overturning institutional boundaries of identity and belonging. National citizenship categories in particular have become increasingly limiting and constrictive in relation to the wide variety of reproductive practices individuals enact transnationally. Issues such as the family basis of migration, the fertility and birthrates of migrants and ethnic minorities, the rise in mixed marriages, the transnational spread of familial and kinship networks and the access to citizenship for “second-generations” are only the most visible signs of a deeply rooted change, which impacts the composition and shape of national populations and triggers new citizenship claims.

Faced with these processes, dominant demographic discourse has adopted ethno-racial classifications and slipped easily into a rhetoric of danger: the danger of invasion, extinction, poverty and cultural disintegration. Still lacking or underdeveloped is a primarily social analysis of the demographic developments at play that draws on socio-anthropological research in order to problematize the demographic construction of minorities, in opposition to national demography; and, at the same time, that explores how individuals and communities ensure their own biological, social and cultural continuity despite and across ethno-national boundaries.

This conference aims to establish a space for international and interdisciplinary dialogue on contemporary socio-demographic shifts. We propose to focus in particular on the biopolitics of reproduction put in motion by both national governments, as they distinguish between citizens and non-citizens, and migrants and their descendents, as they affirm, negotiate or refrain from constructing their own definitions of family, kinship, genealogy and belonging.

In this perspective, which primarily addresses the intersection of reproduction and identity in relation to migrants and multicultural contexts, we invite papers exploring the following issues:

- The analytical categories and classifications employed in research on population, namely ethnicity, race, nation, culture and group;

- Demographic politics and systems for defining national populations;

- Family reunification and the ethno-national bases of welfare systems;

- The marriage practices, reproductive behavior and social genealogies of migrants and their descendents;

- Family planning policies and fertility management among migrants and minorities;

- Notions of identity and continuity in transnational migration.

 

The conference is organised by the SMMS Research Unit (Migration Scenarios and Social Change), Department of Sociology and Social Research, University of Trento.

Confirmed keynote speakers include David Kertzer and Pnina Werbner.

Abstracts (300 words), containing a description of the main argument, the key question(s) driving the paper and the kind of evidence analysed, should be sent by 20 February 2014 to the following address: smms@soc.unitn.it. For further information please contact the conference coordinators, Francesca Decimo [francesca.decimo@unitn.it] Alessandra Gribaldo [alegribaldo@women.it] and Paolo Boccagni [paolo.boccagni@unitn.it].

Acceptance will be notified by 28th of February 2014. Full papers (5-8.000 words) are expected by 30th April 2014.

U.S. High Skilled Immigration: Problems, Misconceptions, and Solutions – Feb. 19

Ron Hira, Associate Professor of Public Policy, Rochester Institute of Technology

Join Ron Hira  & discussant Peter Gourevitch as they discuss reform of U.S. immigration policy, on the congressional agenda for the first time since 2007.While the most contentious elements of the policy debate surround the 11 million undocumented living in the U.S., the policy proposals for re-shaping high skilled immigration are also controversial. This talk will cover the perceived problems with current high skilled immigration policy. It will also explore common misconceptions that distort the public discussion. High skilled immigration is a source of vibrancy for the U.S., especially in technology and research sectors, so getting the policies correct is of great importance to the nation’s innovation system.Using new government data, obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, Dr. Hira will present a clearer picture about how high-skill guest worker visas, such as the H-1B, and legal permanent residence visas are actually used.

Ron Hira is Associate Professor and Acting Chair of the Department of Public Policy at Rochester Institute of Technology. He specializes in policy issues on technological innovation, offshoring, high-skill immigration, and the American engineering workforce. Ron is also a Research Associate with the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, DC.

He is co-author of the book, Outsourcing America (AMCOM, 2nd edition 2008), which was a finalist for best business book in the PMA’s Benjamin Franklin Awards. The Boston Globe called the work an “honest, disturbing look at outsourcing.” The Washington Post described the book as a “thorough and easy to grasp primer on the wrenching outsourcing debate.”In 2007, Ron served as a consultant to the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Science & Technology helping to organize a series of hearings on the Globalization of Innovation and Research & Development.

Peter A. Gourevitch is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at  UCSD’s School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, of which he is also the Founding Dean.
As a world-renowned expert on international relations and comparative politics, Gourevitch specializes in corporate governance systems in a globalizing world economy, comparing differences in the way countries structure companies and their relationship to shareholders.  His work includes a particular focus on national responses to pressures arising from international trade and economic globalization, trade disputes among countries, and international trade negotiations. Recently he has been working on corporate social responsibility and the relationship between NGO’s, regulation and international institutionsHis books include Politics in Hard Times: Comparative Responses to International Crises (Cornell, 1986) and  Political Power and Corporate Control : The New Global Politics of Corporate Control (Princeton, 2005). Other publications focus on U.S.-Japan relations after the Cold War and international economic relations.  From 1996 to 2001 he co-edited, with David Lake, International Organization, a leading scholarly journal on international relations.


*Please feel free to bring a lunch.

All CCIS research seminars are podcasted.  Search “center for comparative immigration studies” on iTunes and listen to our seminars on the go!

For arrangements to accommodate a disability, contact the Office for Students with Disabilities at  deaf-hohrequest@ucsd.edu or (858) 534-9709 (TTY).