Tomás Jiménez – What’s Really Behind Diversity’s Effect on Social Capital? Evidence from a Super-diverse Context

Seminar to be held on Wednesday, April 17th in ERC 115 at 12:00 pm.

Tomás Jiménez is an assistant professor of sociology at Stanford University. He is also a Fellow at the Center for Social Cohesion. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity.  He is currently working on three projects. The first examines how host-society individuals (US-born of US-born parents) participate in the assimilation process by drawing on in-depth interviews with host-society individuals and observations in three distinct sub-regions in the Silicon Valley: East Palo Alto, Cupertino, and Berryessa. A second project (with Stanford PhD Candidate, Lorena Castro) looks at how immigration becomes part of American national identity by studying a sample of high school US history textbooks from 1930-2005. A third project (with social psychologist John Dovidio (Yale), political scientist Deborah Schildkraut (Tufts), and social psychologist Yuen Ho (UCLA), uses lab experiments, survey data, and in-depth interviews to to understand how contextual factors shape the sense of belonging and related intergroup attitudes, behaviors, and support for immigration policies among immigrants and host-society members in the United States.  Professor Jiménez has taught at the University of California, San Diego. He has also been an Irvine Fellow at the New America Foundation. Before that, he was the American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of Rep. Michael Honda (CA-15). He holds a B.S. in sociology from Santa Clara University and A.M.and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Harvard University.