Mexican Migration and the Economic Crisis Released

The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies announces the publication of the first fieldwork-based study of the impacts of the U.S. economic crisis on Mexican migration to the United States:

economic-crisis(distributed by Lynne Rienner Publishers)
Edited by Wayne A. Cornelius, David FitzGerald, Pedro Lewin, and Leah Muse-Orlinoff
2009, 276 pages, paperback

Based on 1,031 survey interviews and more than 500 hours of in-depth unstructured interviewing, on both sides of the border, this volume is the first fieldwork-based study of how the U.S. economic crisis that erupted in 2007 has affected flows of Mexican migrants to and from the United States. Focusing on Tunkás, a migrant-sending community in rural Yucatán that they first studied in 2006, and its satellite communities in southern California, the researchers find that it is the combination of poor job prospects in the United States with higher costs of migration (mainly, people-smugglers’ fees) that has discouraged new migration in recent years, among both legal and unauthorized migrants. They also find that neither the economic crisis nor workplace raids and other forms of interior enforcement are inducing large numbers of migrants already in the United States to go home. The researchers document the strategies that have been developed by migrants and their dependents in Mexico to cope with the economic crisis, how migrants navigate the contracting U.S. labor market, and how the economic crisis is affecting health, education, and community participation on both sides of the border. A ground-breaking chapter shows how a “youth culture of migration” develops in a migrant-sending community. This volume is the fifth in a series based on the research of the Mexican Migration Field Research and Training Program at the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, UC San Diego.

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